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Conclusion of the West London Zone Steering Group

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Presentation of the findings of the West London Zone's Steering Group (Dec 2014 - May 2015) and proposals for operationalisation of WLZ.

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Conclusion of the West London Zone Steering Group

  1. 1. Concluding Steering Group Meeting 21st May 2015 1
  2. 2. Agenda 2 • Welcome – Danny Kruger, Chief Executive • Concluding report on work-streams – Louisa Mitchell, Managing Director • Theory of change and partnership management – Danny Kruger, Chief Executive • Data – Rosario Piazza, Research and Policy Officer; Emily Barran, Project Officer • Community engagement – Maud Weber-Brown, Consultant • Making it happen – Louisa Mitchell, Managing Director • Operational structure, what it means to be a partner, White City operations 2015/16 and future roll out – Louisa Mitchell, Managing Director • Finance – Nigel Ball, Director of Social Investment; Caroline Sence, Development Manager • Working together: your feedback on our proposals – Danny Kruger, Chief Executive
  3. 3. Concluding report on work-streams Louisa Mitchell, Managing Director 3 Welcome Concluding report on work-streams Making it happen Working together: your feedback on our proposals
  4. 4. Status update 4 • Introductory Steering Group meeting in December 2014 • Online questionnaire to volunteer participation in work-streams • All attendees agreed to participate in 6-month Steering Group process • Different process for each work-stream: – Theory of change – Partnership management – Data – Community engagement – Finance (collective impact bond) • Most of the work-streams complete and informing operational design/assembly • Proposals on operations today for your collective feedback
  5. 5. Our collaborators 5 Arch Apprentices Ark Swift Primary School Avenues Youth Project Big Local - White City Brent CVS Bridging the Gap: Funpact Burlington Danes Academy BWB Impact CentreForum Creative Futures Dalgarno Trust Demos Early Intervention Foundation Epic CIC Family Friends Floreat Genesis Housing Association Hammersmith & Fulham BCU Hammersmith & Fulham Council Hammersmith United Charities Harrow Club Imperial College London IPPR John Lyon’s Charity Kensington & Chelsea Council Kensington & Chelsea Foundation King Solomon Academy London Early Years Foundation London Sports Trust Masbro Centre Neighbourhood Mums & Dads One Westminster Only Connect Paddington Development Trust Peadbody Housing Trust Phoenix High School Place2Be Policy Exchange QPR Trust Randolph Beresford Early Years Centre Reform Resurgo RSA Rugby Portobello Trust Save the Children Sobus St Francis Community Church St Michael's & St George's Church St Stephen’s Primary School TBAP Multi Academy Trust The Avenues Youth Project The ClementJames Centre The Prince’s Trust The Stowe Centre The Winch The Young Foundation Thomas Coram Research Unit Triborough Children's Services Vanessa Nursery School & Cathnor Park Children's Centre Vital Regeneration West London Alliance West London Collaborative West London Citizens Westminster Academy Westminster City Council Westway Trust White City Adventure Playground White City Community Centre White City Enterprise YouthNet
  6. 6. Theory of change Danny Kruger, Chief Executive 6
  7. 7. Vision 7 I value myself I am able to design a life I value I have meaningful relationships I participate in the community around me I have the right conditions and support to manage my circumstances I do not value myself I am unable to design a life I value I lack meaningful or beneficial relationships I do not or cannot participate in the community around me I do not have the right conditions and support to manage my circumstances Suffering harm On the edge Struggling Surviving Progressing Shared goal: every child lands in adulthood safe, happy and healthy Flourishing Source: Participle, Life Programme
  8. 8. A child’s journey to adulthood 8 Three students who attended Hammersmith schools from 2007-2012, with expected attainment gateways 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 1 2 3 4 5 6 Student A Student B Student C Gateways Student C (orange) needed WLZ support to go through the critical attainment hoops on the road to ‘flourishing’ Studentachievements(%ofprogressmade) Early Years (EYFS) Key Stage 1 Key Stage 2 Key Stage 3 Key Stage 4 Key Stage 5 EYFS Gateway: Good level of development KS1 Gateway: Level 1C or above KS2 Gateway: Level 3C or above KS4 Gateway: A-C GCSE KS5 Gateway: 53 GCSE average point KS3 Gateway: Level 4C or above
  9. 9. Theory of change: child/young person HYPOTHESIS To flourish a child needs a positive community of agencies* around them, which help them develop their strengths and address their needs. Children and young people also benefit from a wider social culture which embraces learning, work and family life. ACTIVITY Analyse: understand the complex and intertwined needs of each child, and prove what programmes work best. OUTCOMESEXPERIENCE DESTINATION A flourishing adult with a safe, healthy and happy life. Broker: ensure delivery of tailored cradle-to-career support for each child. * Agencies: formal institutions and informal social groups with which children and young people interact, including: family, friends, education and training providers, leisure services, and support services. Sufficient support to develop strengths and address needs. Key indicators show child or young person is passing developmental milestones including academic attainment levels. 9 The child or young person has high self- regard and self- management, is more pro-social among peers and more integrated with the wider community. Align: ensure that provision complements the support provided by other (including statutory) agencies. Bespoke support i.e. a tailored range of programmes held together by long-term trusting relationships. Coherent support i.e. agencies share common values, goals and information.
  10. 10. Theory of change: community HYPOTHESIS ACTIVITY OUTCOMESEXPERIENCE DESTINATION * Agencies: formal institutions and informal social groups which children and young people interact with, including: family, friends, education and training providers, leisure services, and support services. A society in which communities and agencies* know each other and share common values and goals is best able to help children flourish. If West London has a bigger, better connected and sustainably funded social sector, a culture which embraces learning and work family life will develop across the community. A community which supports children and young people to flourish and land in adulthood safe, healthy and happy. Family: parents are engaged with child development, offer stable home environment, are empowered to take control of own lives. Neighbourhood: a safe environment enables young people to aspire to be role models in their community. Systems: agencies reach children that need support, with co-ordinated, sustainable delivery model. Identify agencies which can best support a child to develop their capabilities. Ensure coherence between agencies through: shared values long-term relationships effective objective-setting data management collective impact assessment. Connect and scale the social sector. Social and statutory sectors are aligned over long-term support. Agencies are adequately resourced. Agencies are better informed, supported and financed, allowing them to focus on what they do best: supporting children and young people. Connected community develops around co-ordinated agencies and delivery of support. 10 Support them financially.
  11. 11. A flourishing child 11 Learning & development Health & wellbeing Community participation Healthy & active; high self-esteem; no substance misuse 18 11 4 Economic participation (work or enterprise), training/ education Engaged with community (e.g. volunteering); accessing services as required Positive relationships; role model at home and in community Relationships & behaviour 25 Age
  12. 12. Collective Impact model 12 1. Individuals Move children and young people as close to consistently flourishing as possible by developing their capabilities 2.Communities Social sector-led partnership rooted in the neighbourhood, mobilising local social assets 3. Systems Lobby for change in the political and economic environment 4. Culture Work over the long term with individuals, communities and systems to achieve a tipping point where the culture naturally embraces learning, work and family life Foundational activity Collective impact* Long-term ambition *5 conditions of Collective Impact: common agenda, shared measurement, mutually reinforcing activities continuous communication, backbone support
  13. 13. Partnership management Danny Kruger, Chief Executive 13
  14. 14. Management structure 14 • Board of Trustees – Legal and fiduciary responsibility – Currently three board members, to be expanded (appointments by members consisting of participants in Reference Board and Delivery Board) • Reference Board – A consultative body representing the community WLZ serves, composed of parents and young people – Target approx. 100 people within 2 years – Quarterly meetings chaired by a resident on a 12 month term • Delivery Board – Strategic influence and delivery responsibility – To comprise stakeholders with a role in delivery of work, e.g. delivery partners, funders, colleagues from statutory agencies, local business people – Focused on White City in year one, future sub-groups by neighbourhood – 12 month terms, appointed by Trustees on recommendations of Executive Team • Advisory Board – Independent expertise on an ad hoc basis • Working Groups – Established to examine a specific issue/interest for a time-limited period, supported by Executive Team • Executive Team – The ‘backbone’ team responsible for day-to-day management – Legally accountable to Trustees, also reports regularly to Delivery and Reference Boards on strategy
  15. 15. Data Emily Barran, Project Officer Rosario Piazza, Policy & Research Officer 15
  16. 16. Our findings 16 Data Collection Org 1 Org 2 Org 3 Org 4 Org 5 Org 6 Org 7 Org 8 What data do you collect? Personal Demographic Attendance Academic Behavioural How is it collected? Referral/application form Register Intake/mid-way/exit assessment Questionnaire/survey Case files Who provides it? Frontline worker Parent Beneficiary Teacher Admin staff Why is the data collected? Case management Internal evaluation External evaluation Funder/contract requirements When is the data collected? Intake Exit Academic timetable Through programme delivery Post-engagement Evaluation What analysis is performed internally? Impact on academic performance Behavioural trends Comparison analysis of cohort Programme evaluation External evaluation? Systems How is the data stored? Bespoke system Off-the-shelf CRM/database Statutory system Excel Paper Data sharing Do you share data with any other organisations? Aggregated Individual Informal Informal Informal
  17. 17. Data management and measurement 17 Planning Collection Sharing Processing Aggregating Measurement Reporting Reflection Partners and backbone agree timings and data points to be collected Partners collect agreed personal, demographic and indicator data from children and young people at beginning and end of programme (or at regular intervals) Partners send data to backbone Backbone checks data Backbone adds data to master record spreadsheet Backbone runs analysis on the aggregated data to track progress towards collective outcomes and evaluation Backbone produces data visualisation dashboards and shares findings with partners, community & funders Partners and backbone review results and share feedback on the process
  18. 18. Name: Arman Berwari Gender: Male DoB: 20/02/2006 Age: 9 Ethnicity: Kurdish First Language: Kurdish Religion: Sunni Islam Address: Flat 2, Newall Court, Heathstan Road, Shepherd's Bush W12 0SQ School: Wormholt Park Statutory Provision: FSM, School Clothing, School Transport and SEN provision (Action) Father: Unknown Mother: Ajwan Berwari (born in 1987), moved to England in 2005 Siblings profile: One older sister, Lalereng (age 11, born 17/04/2004) EAL, FSM, no SEN provision Economic Participation: Low Socio-Economic participation (NS-SeC) Early Home Learning Environment: Was recorded as Low-Intensity EHLE Household Composition: Overcrowded - 1 bedroom council flat, 3 residents IDACI: 3,589 IMD: 3,064 Employment Index: 4,862 Income Deprivation: 2,231 IMDs Top Rank: 32,482 Individual child dashboard (Fictional for illustration purposes only) Source: School data, School census, Housing Register, Census and IMD DEMOGRAPHICS
  19. 19. Individual child dashboard (Summary snapshot of some indicators, fictional for illustration purposes only) ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE LEARNING & DEVELOPMENT EYFS Profile: Was recorded as : ‘Not yet reaching level of development (emerging) Phonics Test: 22/40 KS1: Achieved Level 2 in English, did not achieve Level 2 in Writing and Maths KS2: Currently working towards Level 3 Source: School data DEVELOPMENTAL MILESTONES Executive Functioning: 0 20 40 60 80 100 Inhibition Shift Emotional Control Behavioural Regulation Index Initiation Working memory Planning/Organization Organization of Materials Self-Monitoring Metacognition Index Global Executive Composite Speech & Language, Numeracy & Literacy: HEALTH CHECKLIST HEALTH & WELLBEING Nutrition: Yes No Bottle-fed  EY Breakfast-Club  GREEN: in average range; ORANGE: at risk Immunisation: Due (child's age) Completed? 2, 3, 4 & 36 months  2, 4 & 12 months  2 & 3 months  3 & 12 months  2, 3 & 4 years  1 & 3 years  RELATIONSHIPS & BEHAVIOUR EMOTIONAL WELLBEING School attendance: 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Autumn Spring Summer Engagement with learning: 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Autumn Spring Summer Weight: Height Weight Birth 18/19.4 6.5/7.3 Age 2: 28.7/29.2 19.8/20.4 Age 5: 40/39.5 34/34 Year 11: 53/52.5 62/62 Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Speech & Language Numeracy & Literacy Expected Level 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Emotional Symptoms Conduct Problems Hyperactivity/Inattention Peer Relationship Problems Prosocial Behaviour SDQ score COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION Engagement with sport: Teacher’s feedback: Some reports of lack of attention and engagement with learning. Counselling and professional support may be required to support prosocial behaviour and age appropriate emotional development. Source: EYFS Profile/School data Source: External social sector provider Source: External social sector provider Source: External social sector provider Physical Activity: After school football club by external provider Source: Children's Centre, Local GP and Department of Health Source: School data Source: Teacher’s quantitative assessment Source: External social sector provider Source: School arts programme Engagement with arts: 0% 50% 100% Autumn Winter Spring Summer Attendance Progression Resilience 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Autumn Winter Spring Summer Attendance Engagement Progression Parental feedback: Mother reports working hard to read together every evening but struggling to engage. Enthused by positive engagement with sport and upwards trend in progression.
  20. 20. Cohort analytics (Fictional for illustration purposes only) Name Age Ethnicity EAL FSM SEN KS1 KS2 School Attendance School Engagement Arman Berwari 9 Kurdish    Rima Anderson 14 White and Asian    Kulane Ibráhim 13 Black African    Clare Johnson 11 White    0 1 2 3 Reading Writing English Maths Science KS1 KS1 Expected Level 0 1 2 3 Reading Writing English Maths Science KS1 KS1 Expected Level 0 1 2 3 Reading Writing English Maths Science KS1 KS1 Expected Level 0 1 2 3 4 Reading Writing English Maths Science KS1 KS1 Expected Level 0 1 2 3 4 Reading Writing English Maths Science KS2 KS2 Expected Level 0 1 2 3 4 Reading Writing English Maths Science KS2 KS2 Expected Level 0 1 2 3 4 Reading Writing English Maths Science KS2 KS2 Expected Level 0 1 2 3 4 Reading Writing English Maths Science KS2 KS2 Expected Level 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Autumn Spring Summer 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Autumn Spring Summer 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Autumn Spring Summer 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Autumn Spring Summer 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Autumn Spring Summer 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Autumn Spring Summer 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Autumn Spring Summer 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Autumn Spring Summer Source: School data 77% 49% 70% 76% 80% 23% 51% 30% 24% 20% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Reading Writing English Maths Science KS1 Level 2 or + KS1 Level 1 or - Percentage of students who failed and achieved at KS1 64% 60% 62% 77% 77% 36% 40% 38% 23% 23% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Reading Writing English Maths Science KS2 Level 4 or + KS2 Level 3 or - Percentage of students who failed and achieved at KS2 22% 27% 24% 15% 3% 23% 25% 21% 13% 4% 0% 10% 20% 30% EAL FSM Action Action Plus Statement of Need KS1 Level 1 or - KS2 Level 3 or - Percentage of students who failed at KS1 and KS2 by characteristics
  21. 21. Community Engagement Maud Weber-Brown, Consultant 21
  22. 22. Summary findings • The collective will to work together as a community will define the effectiveness of WLZ • Community Engagement is the most important element of this, but the hardest to consistently identify or quantify • The desire to see sustainable change for a generation of children is a big ambition. The temptation to separate the intangible from the more obviously measurable must be resisted • WLZ will need to be highly strategic in its community relationships and clearly targeted in its community operations • Strategically WLZ will: – Develop relationships according to shared values and common goals. This will be with all its partners via the Delivery Board, the Reference Board and the day-to-day process of acting as a backbone organisation • Operationally WLZ will: – Provide care and maintenance of the network, supporting its partners’ delivery – Shoulder the burden of some of the challenging aspects of its partners’ work – Employ best-practice Zone Brokers to connect families, the social sector and statutory support • In summary, all this will be possible because WLZ is led by the social sector 22
  23. 23. Zone Brokers 23 Phase 1: Community Link Workers Siam Antoinette • Interviewing young people and families • Researching how services are used • Determining provision of support, gaps and duplication • Identifying social sector programmes • Developing WLZ network • Understanding local social assets and community dynamics Rahel Goenner • The Zone Brokers are WLZ’s frontline workers – not delivering, but connecting and facilitating • Broker between children’s centres, schools, health centres and other statutory agencies, youth clubs and social sector providers • Organising referrals, programme delivery, collection and transferral of data • Working closely with Social Inclusion Managers and Head Teachers • Physically based between WLZ office and children’s centres, schools etc. • Aim to become long-term mentors and adult role models to children and families, trusted leaders Phase 2: Zone Brokers
  24. 24. Making it happen Louisa Mitchell, Managing Director 24 Welcome Concluding report on work-streams Making it happen Working together: your feedback on our proposals
  25. 25. What it means to be a partner 25 Network partners • Delivers support as part of tailored package to individual children • Exchanges referrals through WLZ – including strengths and needs analysis of children • Shares data to enable collective measurement • Benefits from transparency, working to outcomes, impact assessment • May be supported with philanthropy or social investment to scale-up and work towards long term financial sustainability Delivery partners (data/finance) • Non-selective, voluntary, open-to-all (e.g. CVSs, residents associations, charities, businesses, public agencies) • Working towards shared vision of community • Connecting and participating in the network (e.g. events, newsletters, information on services, opportunities for shared referrals/services) • Mobilising local social assets for community benefit • Collaborative not competitive Network partners
  26. 26. Partnership in practice 26 Engage partners Broker to schools Share referrals Co-ordinate delivery Process data Track collective outcomes Raise finance Engage partners Broker to schools Share referrals Co-ordinate delivery Process data Track collective outcomes Earn payment- by-results
  27. 27. Partnership exploration 27 Summary of critical questions (as part of more extensive exploration framework) Activities What are the partner/programme activities (core and non-core)? •Do they meet needs identified by WLZ or work towards one or more of the outcomes? •What is the theory of change? Vision? Values? Long-term aims? Resources and capacity Who is in the team and do they have relevant expertise in delivery and in management? What is the current size and reach of the organisation. Does it have the relevant human and other resources (e.g. qualified staff, equipment, premises, materials)? Is the organisation in the Zone geography and if not, does it have the potential to deliver into the area? Does the organisation have the capacity to deliver as a WLZ partner and if not, do the current structure and resources allow the organisation to comfortably increase capacity? Data collection/ outcomes tracking Does the organisation collect data that contributes to indicators and outcomes measurement? How does it collect such data and process it? If it does not, is it willing and able to collect such data with initial guidance? If it does not, how does it currently assess the impact of its programmes? What systems does it use? Is the organisation willing and able to share both qualitative and quantitative data? •Is the organisation able to ask for consent from children & families? Will Does the organisation and its management team have the will for engaging with collective impact? •Can the organisation support WLZ’s vision for children and young people? •Does the organisation see benefits in collaborating with WLZ and other partners? Stakeholders Who are the key stakeholders in the organisation? Finances What is the current financial model and status regarding cash flow adequacy/balance sheet solvency? How cost efficient is the operating and delivery model (comparable to other programmes)?
  28. 28. Home learning Attachment / engagement Health & wellbeing Speech, language & communication Network delivery model – Year 1 28 0-4 years old Support contracted for this age stage Support continued in this age stage Note: These diagrams represent the type of child specific support WLZ expects to co-ordinate in the first year of operations, with the aim of addressing other needs affecting the child, such as domestic abuse, housing and parent economic participation, in later years.
  29. 29. Health & wellbeing Speech, language & communication Mental health Transition (parent/child) School attendance & engagement Numeracy & literacy Network delivery model – Year 1 29 4-11 years old Support contracted for this age stage Support continued in this age stage Note: These diagrams represent the type of child specific support WLZ expects to co-ordinate in the first year of operations, with the aim of addressing other needs affecting the child, such as domestic abuse, housing and parent economic participation, in later years.
  30. 30. Health & wellbeing Mental health Transition (parent / child) School attendance & engagement Drug & alcohol support Healthy relationships Employability / Enterprise skills Network delivery model – Year 1 30 11-18 years old Support contracted for this age stage Support continued in this age stage Note: These diagrams represent the type of child specific support WLZ expects to co-ordinate in the first year of operations, with the aim of addressing other needs affecting the child, such as domestic abuse, housing and parent economic participation, in later years.
  31. 31. Health & wellbeing Mental health Drug & alcohol support Healthy relationships Training / higher education Economic participation Community activity Network delivery model – Year 1 31 18-25 years old Support contracted for this age stage Support continued in this age stage Note: These diagrams represent the type of child specific support WLZ expects to co-ordinate in the first year of operations, with the aim of addressing other needs affecting the child, such as domestic abuse, housing and parent economic participation, in later years.
  32. 32. Timetable and critical path 32 • Assembly activities – Partner exploration – Data/outcomes commitments – Working agreements (including financing arrangements) – Preparation and co-ordination with anchor children’s centre, schools and youth centre – Building and facilitating the network partners Dec 2014 – May Design June – Sept Assembly Sept – Dec 2015 Initiation CIB outcomes, network & financial modelling CIB network governance & management systems Prep for launch of CIB in 2016 Collective Impact Bond:
  33. 33. Rollout plan 33 Year 1: 2015/16 Year 2: 2016/17 Year 3: 2017/18 Year 4: 2018/19 Indicates an ‘anchor organisation’, e.g. school or health centre
  34. 34. Target children and young people 34 Incare Abletoaccess significantstatutory support Somestatutorysupport butstillinneedandat riskofexclusion Consistentlyinbottom20-30%at schooloratriskofexclusion Borderlineperformanceat school,butwellbeingor otherneeds Meetingattainment atschool&noother needs Flourishing, significant supportin place High High Low Low Impact of WLZ Level of need Greatest impact for WLZ With thanks and apologies to Leap Confronting Conflict
  35. 35. 375 800 1,250 2,150 3,350 4,500 650 1,500 2,750 4,500 5,500 7,750 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 14,000 2015/16 2016/17 2017/18 2018/19 2019/20 2020/21 2021/22 Number of children and young people AcademicYear Estimated roll out 35 Delivery range is the expected number of children who are directly engaging with a tailored package of support Network range is the estimated wider number of children who benefit from classroom, community and general network effect (including some data sharing and cohort analytics) Notes on roll-out estimates: Based on aim to support 20-30% of children in the Zone, according to target children as per previous slide. Does not yet take into account differences in population needs at difference schools/centres. Is based on neighbourhood by neighbourhood approach and adding schools/centres as the operational anchors each year. Numbers of participating children in each year represent total number of children accessing WLZ support each year, and do not represent unique children across years. Year 1: approx. 120 children supported by delivery, up to around 350 impacted in the network
  36. 36. £0 £1,000,000 £2,000,000 £3,000,000 £4,000,000 £5,000,000 £6,000,000 £7,000,000 2015/16 2016/17 2017/18 2018/19 2019/20 2020/21 2021/22 Financial Year Backbone Collaboration Delivery Estimated expenditure 36 Annual estimates of expenditure Year 1: Backbone: £375,000 Collaboration: £50,000 Delivery: £150,000 Year 7: Backbone: £580,000 Collaboration: £350,000 Delivery: £6,250,000 Notes on expenditure estimates: Based on roll-out numbers of children/anchors by neighbourhood and based on estimated cost of tailored support per child per annum (calculated using a range of programmes for which we know approximate costs and aligned with current spend per child using pupil premium). Social investment and philanthropy Philanthropy • Backbone: core costs to support the infrastructure work of the WLZ Executive Team • Collaboration: disbursements to partners to support collaboration and/or contract readiness costs • Delivery: funding to enable multi-streamed interventions to be delivered to scale
  37. 37. Finance Caroline Sence, Development Manager Nigel Ball, Director of Social Investment 37
  38. 38. Fund raising strategy 38 Blended finance model: Backbone costs (core) ← Philanthropy Collaboration costs ← Philanthropy Delivery (scale-up) ← Philanthropy & social investment Philanthropy: Individuals • Living in West London • Interested in improving outcomes in their local community • Keen to be involved in transforming lives at scale and changing systems • See value in making a contribution to infrastructure (inc. data systems) and collaboration Corporates • With interests in West London • Can see the benefit of an improved local community • See the impact of supporting a start-up building on an evidence based approach Trusts and foundations • New approaches to systems change and social investment readiness /access • Strategies for addressing multiple disadvantages for children and young people
  39. 39. Collective Impact Bond 39 Status • Design and feasibility phase recently initiated with development funding awarded by Cabinet Office/Big Lottery Commissioning Better Outcomes Fund, advised by BWB Impact • Expecting to raise approximately £8 million over a 6-8 year tenure starting in 2016 Features • Multiple providers: collective, social sector-led model, using commissioning and spot purchasing to facilitate fluid, multi-stream delivery around the child and to enable small and medium sized charities, offering excellent services in West London, to scale up in the Zone. • Multiple outcomes: addresses multiple needs in a dynamic, data-driven structure that delivers outcomes along the life of a child. • Multiple buyers: statutory outcome buyers topped up by CBOF, and corporate and philanthropic outcome buyers. • Social capital: a locality-based model, in an area defined by need, not municipal boundaries, and directly seeking to engage families, young people and volunteers in the delivery of support. • Private wealth: mobilises West London’s considerable private financial capital to contribute to improved outcomes in their local community.
  40. 40. Working together: your feedback on our proposals Danny Kruger, Chief Executive 40 Welcome Concluding report on work-streams Making it happen Working together: your feedback on our proposals
  41. 41. WLZ Glossary of terms 41 The Zone: 3 square miles around the Harrow Road corridor covering 4 local authorities: north Hammersmith and Fulham, north Kensington and Chelsea, north Westminster and south Brent. Collective Impact: the effort of multiple players – communities themselves, service providers, policy makers, public and private funders – to coordinate their approaches around a shared goal, to address at scale a hard to shift issue in a defined community. Collective impact initiatives have five characteristics: •A Common Agenda is a shared vision for change, including a common understanding of the problem and a joint approach to solving it through agreed upon actions. •Shared Measurement is collecting data and measuring results consistently across all participants to ensure activities remain aligned, decisions are data-driven, and participants hold each other accountable. •Mutually Reinforcing Activities are actions taken by stakeholders that are both differentiated and coordinated through a plan of action. •Continuous Communication is consistent and open across the many players in order to build trust, assure mutual objectives, and appreciate common motivation. •The Backbone Organization coordinates and manages the day-to-day operations and implementation of work, including stakeholder engagement, communications, data collection and analysis, and other responsibilities. Collective Impact Bond is WLZ’s social impact bond featuring multiple providers, commissioners and outcomes. Network partner: a partner active in the Zone with similar objectives to the collective, whose agenda is aligned with WLZ. Engages in open and frequent communication, shares information, but is not in a contractual relationship with WLZ. Delivery partner: a partner directly supporting children in the Zone, committed to shared measurement, receiving support from the backbone (financial and/or in-kind) and contracted with WLZ. Social assets: The individuals, organisations, buildings and relationships which make up the community. These may be formal (e.g. residents associations) or informal (faith communities); tangible (community buildings) or intangible (support network). Output: the activity undertaken by or with a beneficiary when they take part in a programme. For example, the output of a sports programme could be the number of sports coaching sessions attended by the beneficiary, the progression in capability and the resilience in performance. Outcome: the result for the beneficiary of a particular programme or activity. For example, the intended positive outcome of a sports programme would be improved health for the beneficiary. Indicators: used to track the initiative’s progress towards outcome and impact goals using both existing or new data sources and methodologies. Steering group: the entity providing guidance and oversight to the Collective Impact initiative, with organic membership representing the wide range of stakeholders with the ability to influence the issues. Theory of change: a process to identify what preconditions (programmes, decisions, relationships etc) are necessary to bring about our long-term goal, that every child lands safe, happy and healthy in adulthood. Community engagement: working with residents and organisations by listening, collaborating, empowering and informing them as partners in designing and achieving the goals of the Collective Impact initiative. Community engagement can range from a more passive, informational outreach approach to a more proactive approach involving citizens in decision-making.

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