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SLCCC - Best Practices 2008
          Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute - Missouri School of Journalism




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SLCCC - Best Practices 2008
Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute - Missouri School of Journalism



ExECUTIVE SUMMARY
T...
SLCCC - Best Practices 2008
Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute - Missouri School of Journalism



INTRODUCTION

Sirca...
SLCCC - Best Practices 2008
Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute - Missouri School of Journalism



It was also determi...
SLCCC - Best Practices 2008
Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute - Missouri School of Journalism



existing three and ...
SLCCC - Best Practices 2008
Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute - Missouri School of Journalism



PERIMETER GLASS WAL...
SLCCC - Best Practices 2008
Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute - Missouri School of Journalism



CLOSING

Despite th...
SLCCC - Best Practices 2008
    Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute - Missouri School of Journalism




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St. Louis Council of Construction Consumers - Best Practices Submission for the Journalism School

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Award Winning Journalism School Project at the University of Misssouri-Columbia.
Award write-up with photos from the beginning of construction to occupancy.

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St. Louis Council of Construction Consumers - Best Practices Submission for the Journalism School

  1. 1. SLCCC - Best Practices 2008 Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute - Missouri School of Journalism DONALD W. REYNOLDS JOURNALISM INSTITUTE University of Missouri - Columbia St. Louis Council Construction Consumers Award Submission October 24, 2008 SLCCC BEST PRACTICES AWARDS 2008
  2. 2. SLCCC - Best Practices 2008 Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute - Missouri School of Journalism ExECUTIVE SUMMARY The new $19.0M Donald W. Reynolds School of Journalism at the University of Missouri – Columbia involved three interconnected buildings including interior renovation of Walter Williams Hall, a 1930’s era building, the complete renovation of the original 1890’s era Sociology Building and the construction of a new, modern “Link” building. The Sociology building included a new poured in-place concrete frame “building within a building”. It was found that the 120 year-old Sociology building had crumbling masonry walls and foundations. Many constructability issues were created due to the condition of the Sociology building including interior and exterior temporary bracing and structural reinforcing of the 120 year-old building shell. The temporary bracing also created many conflicts with new construction work. Other challenges included custom construction of new roof steel and “drifting” steel frames thru the existing wooden roof structure. Unique features of the “building within a building” concept included horizontal wind braces from the old building shell to the new concrete frame and interior glass walls around the perimeter of the new structure. Other project features included matching the original stained glass windows, a structural glass walkway and a new TV studio. Despite the severe unforeseen conditions jeopardizing the project’s survival, the Sircal/ Kozeny-Wagner team presented creative and responsible solutions to very challenging engineering conditions that resulted in salvaging the project, not to mention one of the landmark historical centerpiece buildings to the University of Missouri Columbia Campus.
  3. 3. SLCCC - Best Practices 2008 Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute - Missouri School of Journalism INTRODUCTION Sircal/Kozeny-Wagner a Joint Venture was selected, by competitive bidding, as the General Contractor for the new $19.0M Donald W. Reynolds School of Journalism at the University of Missouri – Columbia. (Photo 1.) The project involved three interconnected buildings including interior renovation of Walter Williams Hall, (Photo 2.) a 1930’s era building, the complete renovation of the original 1890’s era Sociology Building (Photo 3.) and the construction of a new, modern “Link” building. The Sociology building included a new poured in-place concrete frame “building within a building”. More details about the “building within a building” concept will be provided below. BEST PRACTICES This Best Practices submission will focus mainly on the constructability practices and methods used for the renovation of the 1890’s Sociology Building. (Photo 3.) However, many other Best Practices were utilized including materials management, team building, quality management, change management and zero accident techniques. Through the course of the project the construction team field verified every critical dimension and devised ingenious methods to overcome hidden conditions, design challenges and problematic existing conditions. FOUNDATIONS Initially the project team set out to investigate the depth and thickness of the existing fieldstone foundation (Photo 4.) of the 120 year-old Sociology Building. Hand excavations were made at various locations and it was found that the foundation varied in depth up to 4’ around the perimeter of the building. This required custom fabrication of all drilled pier reinforcing cages (Photo 5.) and ‘haunch” beam steel. (Photo 6.) The drilled piers and haunch beams were required to stabilize and reinforce the building foundation before additional work could proceed. After installation of the drilled piers, the haunch beams were hand excavated (Photo 7.) and custom formed for each location. (Photo 9.) The initial investigation and attention to existing conditions allowed the drilled pier and haunch beam construction (Photo 8.) to proceed smoothly eliminating costly change orders and potential delays. ROOF STEEL During investigation of the foundations, the project team also acknowledged the importance of existing dimensions for the fabrication of new roof support steel. (Photo 10.) The project superintendent, project engineer and steel shop drawing detailer spent many days investigating the existing roof structure and existing conditions while taking accurate dimensions for fabrication of the new roof support steel. It was ultimately determined that each new steel support must be custom fabricated due to the 120 year-old existing conditions.
  4. 4. SLCCC - Best Practices 2008 Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute - Missouri School of Journalism It was also determined that even accurate existing dimensions and custom fabrication would not insure proper fit of some steel members. Miscellaneous angles and structural tee (WT) joist hanger sections (Photo 11.) were shipped loose and field welded in place as existing conditions dictated. STEEL ERECTION The bid documents indicated that the existing roof was to remain in place and did not address access for installation of new steel. The project team and the erection contractor developed a plan to cut “slot” openings (Photo 12.) through the existing roof to “drift” the new steel into place. (Photo 13.) Intense preplanning for fabrication and erection of the new roof steel kept erection on schedule and costly change orders due to a minimum. (Photos 14, 15, 16,17, 18.) ExISTING MASONRY WALLS In preparation to set the new roof steel, existing masonry bearing walls were uncovered and inspected by the project team. It was found that many of the existing bricks were crumbling and too weak to support the roof loads. It was also found that the original field-mixed mortar had deteriorated and had virtually no strength. Bricks could be removed by hand from existing structural walls. (Photo 19.) The 1890’s building structural integrity was unstable and put at risk the project’s ultimate success. Due to the historical importance of the 1890’s structure, Sircal/Kozeny-Wagner was challenged to develop solution to save the structure. Through creative and responsible engineering solutions, the building was saved and project vision was realized. CUSTOM BUILDING BRACES The project team engineered custom bracing to support the crumbling masonry building. Custom bracing included 4x4 buck frames (Photo 20.) to hold windows square, interior bracing to support walls and hold building corners square (Photos 21, 22, 23, 24,25.) and extensive exterior bracing (Photo 26.) to carry wind and potential seismic loads while an engineered “fix” was developed to save this historic 120 year-old building. (This temporary bracing would remain in place for more than a year creating many more complications, while the “fix” was completed and new structural elements were able to carry wind and seismic loads.) MASONRY REINFORCING A new project team member was added, Masonry Solutions International to engineer the “fix” for the crumbling 120 year-old walls. The on-site project team facilitated the new design by removing areas of existing brick for engineering investigations and performing in-place strength tests of the existing walls and foundations (Photo 26a.). Plans and specifications (Photos 27, 28, 29, 30.) were developed that required new horizontal and “stitched” reinforcing for the existing exterior walls. “Stitched” reinforcing was added to the walls by drilling holes at 30-degree angles, (Photo 31.) in two directions, through the
  5. 5. SLCCC - Best Practices 2008 Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute - Missouri School of Journalism existing three and four wythe thick brick walls. The project team also experimented with drills, drill bits, drill supports and drill braces (Photo 32.) to determine the most efficient methods to drill more than 50,000 reinforcing holes through the crumbling brick walls and foundations. (Photo 33.) As the holes were drilled and reinforcing bars installed, (Photos 34, 35.) a structural grout slurry mix (Photos 36, 36a.) was pumped into all wall cavities, through the stone foundations and at all new reinforcing locations. BASEMENT LEVEL CONSTRUCTION After the building was structurally reinforced and certified by the engineer, the team undercut the existing basement slab by approximately 8’ as part of the new “building within a building” concept. (Photos 37, 38, 39, 40, 41.) A new poured in place 3-story concrete frame would be constructed inside the old 2-story 1890’s building shell. Extreme care was taken throughout construction to protect the temporary bracing (Photo 42, 43.) and to not disturb the existing field stone foundations. CONFLICTS WITH TEMPORARY BRACING The temporary bracing was to remain in place (Photos 44,45,46.) until the new concrete slabs and columns could carry the exterior wind loads and potential seismic loads. The existing foundation bearing elevation would now be approximately 4’ above the new basement floor slab. (Photos 47, 48.) Low headroom drill rigs (Photos 49, 50, 51.) were utilized to complete the interior drilled piers while maintaining the temporary building braces in place. The project team also devised a plan to maintain the exterior temporary bracing while the new “Link” building floor slabs were constructed. (Photos 52, 53, 54.) With the help of the structural engineer, exterior braces were located so that they would pass through the new elevated slabs (Photos 55, 56.) in locations that would not compromise the integrity of the new structure. After completion of the new concrete “Link” structure the braces were removed and several small deck pours were made to fill in the temporary openings in the new pan slabs. This constructability technique allowed new construction to continue despite the interference of the exterior temporary bracing supporting the Sociology building. SEPARATION OF NEW & OLD STRUCTURAL LOADS Several other aspects of the “building within a building” concept required close attention to constructability. The floor slab elevations of the new three-story structure did not line up with the floor slab locations of the old two-story building. (Photo 57.) The new three-story structure was held approximately 2’ away from the old exterior walls. (Photo 58.) New floor slab loads would be carried by the new concrete structure. Floor slab loads were not to be imposed on the existing exterior Sociology walls even after installation of the structural reinforcing designed by Masonry Solutions.
  6. 6. SLCCC - Best Practices 2008 Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute - Missouri School of Journalism PERIMETER GLASS WALLS The differing floor slab elevations required close attention to layout and dimensions for wind bracing of the exterior walls and many other building components. The existing exterior windows also did not line up with the new floor slab elevations. Glass walls were installed as architectural “fall protection” due to the 2’ gap around the new floor slabs and the potential hazard of existing window locations. (Photos 59, 60.) The perimeter glass walls also allowed natural sunlight to fill the new classrooms and offices through the old exterior windows. HISTORIC WINDOW REPLACEMENT Close attention to constructability was also required to match the historic 1890 window profiles (Photo 61.) and original stained glass window patterns. (Photo 62.) Multiple field meetings were held along with many iterations of shop drawings for modern aluminum window profiles to “match” the historic, hand-made window profiles. The team also searched for and found the original stained glass manufacturing company to replace several stained glass windows. (Photo 62.) The University and the Historical Society were very pleased with all the new replacement windows, since the window profile and stained glass” match” were nearly perfect. DIFFERING FLOOR SLAB ELEVATIONS Another constructability concern was the (10) different floor slab elevations in (3) separate buildings, Walter Williams Hall, the Sociology building and the new “Link” building, that comprise the new Journalism School. The three separate buildings connect to the adjacent buildings thru various ramps and stairs. (Photos 63, 64, 65.) One of these ramps included an opaque glass walkway (Photo 66.) with clear glass sidewalls below a glass skylight, creating a dramatic architectural feature connecting the new “Link” building to the Sociology building. (Photo 67.) STRUCTURAL GLASS WALKWAY The project scheduled required the structural glass walkway to be constructed first, with framing and finishes completed later in the project. Protective measures and great care were taken while installing metal stud framing, MEP rough-ins, painting, ceilings and decorative wood panels above this walkway. Scores of workmen crossed this walkway every day, over many months, during the construction of the J-School project. Only one damaged glass panel was replaced due to extreme care and protection during the construction process. “TYPICAL” CONSTRUCTABILITY ISSUES The Journalism School entailed many other “typical” constructability issues including, limited access for deliveries, limited lay down area, tower crane placement, utility trenches below walkways (Photo 68.) and maintaining student access and sidewalks on the busy Mizzou campus. (Photo 69.) To further challenge the project team, the Journalism School was also constructed during the wettest period on record, winter/spring 2008.
  7. 7. SLCCC - Best Practices 2008 Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute - Missouri School of Journalism CLOSING Despite the severe unforeseen conditions jeopardizing the project’s survival, the Sircal/ Kozeny-Wagner team presented creative and responsible solutions to very challenging engineering conditions that resulted in salvaging the project, not to mention one of the landmark historical centerpiece buildings to the University of Missouri Columbia Campus. Best Practices recommends that the constructor become involved early in the planning process to recognize and solved constructability and many other issues prior to start of construction. Although, this was not the case here. We believe that this project demonstrates that a professional construction team adds tremendous value no matter what stage they become involved in a complex addition/renovation project. The new Donald W. Reynolds School of Journalism was successfully completed and ready for the first day of class in August 2008. The Journalism School includes a new library (Photos 70, 71.), computer labs (Photo 72.), a café (Photo 73.), an auditorium with raised seating (Photo 74.), a TV studio (Photos 75, 76.), along with new facility offices and many new classrooms. (Photos 77. & 78. show the exterior of the completed “Link” and Sociology buildings).
  8. 8. SLCCC - Best Practices 2008 Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute - Missouri School of Journalism Photo 1 Photo 2 Photo 3 Photo 4 Photo 5 Photo 6
  9. 9. SLCCC - Best Practices 2008 Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute - Missouri School of Journalism Photo 7 Photo 8 Photo 9 Photo 10 Loose Angles Field Welded WT Photo 11 Photo 12
  10. 10. SLCCC - Best Practices 2008 Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute - Missouri School of Journalism Photo 13 Photo 14 Photo 15 Photo 16 Photo 17 Photo 18
  11. 11. SLCCC - Best Practices 2008 Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute - Missouri School of Journalism Photo 19 Photo 20 Photo 21 Photo 22 Photo 23 Photo 24
  12. 12. SLCCC - Best Practices 2008 Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute - Missouri School of Journalism Photo 25 Photo 26 Photo 26A Photo 27 Photo 28 Photo 29
  13. 13. SLCCC - Best Practices 2008 Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute - Missouri School of Journalism Photo 30 Photo 31 Photo 32 Photo 33 Photo 34 Photo 35
  14. 14. SLCCC - Best Practices 2008 Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute - Missouri School of Journalism Photo 36 Photo 36 A Photo 37 Photo 38 Photo 39 Photo 40
  15. 15. SLCCC - Best Practices 2008 Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute - Missouri School of Journalism Photo 41 Photo 42 Photo 43 Photo 44 Photo 45 Photo 46
  16. 16. SLCCC - Best Practices 2008 Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute - Missouri School of Journalism Photo 47 Photo 48 Photo 49 Photo 50 Photo 51 Photo 52
  17. 17. SLCCC - Best Practices 2008 Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute - Missouri School of Journalism Photo 53 Photo 54 Photo 55 Photo 56 Photo 57 Photo 58
  18. 18. SLCCC - Best Practices 2008 Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute - Missouri School of Journalism Photo 59 Photo 60 Photo 61 Photo 62 Photo 63 Photo 64
  19. 19. SLCCC - Best Practices 2008 Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute - Missouri School of Journalism Photo 65 Photo 66 Photo 67 Photo 68 Photo 69 Photo 70
  20. 20. SLCCC - Best Practices 2008 Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute - Missouri School of Journalism Photo 71 Photo 72 Photo 73 Photo 74 Photo 75 Photo 76
  21. 21. SLCCC - Best Practices 2008 Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute - Missouri School of Journalism Photo 77 Photo 78

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