Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
MIND  OF APLANNER     Wendy Sung | @wendysungasong
BackgroundMy GOAL was to explore the psychographics of Account Planners in hopes of arriving at “insights”, and—more impor...
Secondary and Primary Preliminary Research I started off by reading Heather LeFevre’s   Annual Survey reports, but the on...
Participant Overview Because this was not intended to be a BIG survey,        the grand total of participants was         ...
Age                    11                    10                     9    # Respondents                     8              ...
Years of Planning Experience                     4                     3     # Respondents                     2          ...
Job Title                                                    Current Job Title                                            ...
Company                                                                                     Valid    Cumulative• Most repr...
MotivationsNow to the interesting stuff…
What motivates you the most in your job as               a Planner?                                             #1    Peop...
OK, not too surprising, I suppose. However, upon close inspection, there are some interesting  observations:  #1: Problem...
Problem solvingThat graph was based on this data                                                          #               ...
Also,#2: Competition is most motivating (>3 rating) for Millennials and Boomers                                        Com...
Competition; winning businesses                                                                                           ...
Attitudes     Based on the aforementioned pre-surveyinterviews, I devised a list of theorized “insights” to             te...
Most of the statements tested were             perceived to be “true”              11 out of 15 statements had ≥50% Agree...
Challenge                                                                                                                 ...
Discovery                                                                                                                 ...
Perspective                                                                                                               ...
Ad work                                                                                                                   ...
Self-expression                                                                                                           ...
Brand Associations        What brand(s) and—if applicable—agencies come to mind from reading the statement?              ...
Conclusions and Future Research         So…what does it all mean?               Am I done yet?      Will the world be a be...
So what?Planners do it mainly cause they’re:    •Curious    •Hungry for challenges                                        ...
There will probably be a Part 2… Areas for further research   Why is it that problem solving is more enticing for older ...
AppendixTo view raw data from survey results, access appendix here.(Tables were too large to display clearly in a slide de...
Thanks for reading!If you have any questions or comments about these findings, feel free to                             co...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Mind of a Planner (Survey Results)

4,720 views

Published on

I interviewed 6 planners and surveyed 27 professionals in advertising to explore the psychographics of Account Planners.

This is what I found.

Published in: Business

Mind of a Planner (Survey Results)

  1. 1. MIND OF APLANNER Wendy Sung | @wendysungasong
  2. 2. BackgroundMy GOAL was to explore the psychographics of Account Planners in hopes of arriving at “insights”, and—more importantly—those that I could relate to.I know that Planners are human too. Their personalities may not be defined by their profession, but what I do know is that they LOVE their jobs enough to not be doing it just for the money. There must be something in Planning that appeals to them, and something in them that is, in turn, attracted to it. It is this elusive persona that Planning attracts that I’m interested in exploring through this research.
  3. 3. Secondary and Primary Preliminary Research I started off by reading Heather LeFevre’s Annual Survey reports, but the only psychographic insight I could find was that Planners were motivated by challenge. I also read many blogs and watched many interviews from JuniorStrategy, PSFK, and Redscout  Next, I interviewed 6 planners in New York City, Durham, and St. Louis (their companies are shown at the left) to explore their motivations and to find common characteristics that I could relate to. The survey that I later distributed electronically was based on the findings from those interviews.
  4. 4. Participant Overview Because this was not intended to be a BIG survey, the grand total of participants was 27.The following is a breakdown of their demographics.
  5. 5. Age 11 10 9 # Respondents 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 18-24 25-32 33-47 48-66 >87 Age Group Cumulative• Most were Gen Xers and Frequency Percent Percent Valid 18-24 2 7.4 11.1Millenials 25-32 10 37.0 48.1 •between ages 25-47 33-47 10 37.0 85.2 48-66 4 14.8 100.0 (74%, n=20) >87 Total 1 27 3.7 100.0 3.7
  6. 6. Years of Planning Experience 4 3 # Respondents 2 1 0 0 1 1.5 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 50th %tile # Years Percen Valid Cumulative Frequency t Percent Percent Valid 0 1 3.7 3.7 3.7• Diverse; averaging 8 years 1 1.5 4 1 14.8 3.7 14.8 3.7 18.5 22.2 •Range: 0-25 years 2 3 2 2 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.4 29.6 37.0 •Average: 7.87 years 4 5 1 2 3.7 7.4 3.7 7.4 40.7 48.1 •Mode: 1 years 6 9 1 3 3.7 11.1 3.7 11.1 51.9 63.0 •Median (50th percentile): 6 years 10 11 1 1 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.7 66.7 70.4 12 2 7.4 7.4 77.8 14 1 3.7 3.7 81.5 15 2 7.4 7.4 88.9 16 1 3.7 3.7 92.6 20 1 3.7 3.7 96.3 25 1 3.7 3.7 100.0 Total 27 100.0 100.0
  7. 7. Job Title Current Job Title Cumulative Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent Valid Group Planning Director 7 25.9 25.9 25.9 Planner 5 18.5 18.5 44.4 Planning Director 4 14.8 14.8 59.3 Senior Planner 3 11.1 11.1 70.4 Anthropologist 1 3.7 3.7 74.1 Development Associate 1 3.7 3.7 77.8Planners Director 1 3.7 3.7 81.5 Executive Planning 1 3.7 3.7 85.2 Director HR Business Partner 1 3.7 3.7 88.9 Planning Intern 1 3.7 3.7 92.6 Researcher 1 3.7 3.7 96.3 Sr. Partner Development 1 3.7 3.7 100.0 Manager Total 27 100.0 100.0 • Most common job title was Group Planning Director (25.9%, n=7) • Most work in the Planning function (77.8%, n=21) •EPD (3.7%), GPD (25.9%), Planning Director (14.8%), Senior Planner (11.1%), Planner (18.5%), Planning Intern (3.7%) • Others include: Anthropologist, Researcher, Development Manager, and HR Business Partner
  8. 8. Company Valid Cumulative• Most represented Frequency Percent Percent Percent Valid JWT 8 29.6 29.6 29.6company was JWT AXA Equitable 1 3.7 3.7 33.3(29.6%, n=8), among several BBH Blu Dot Tech 1 1 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.7 37.0 40.7other full service ad agencies, Callahan Creek 1 3.7 3.7 44.4 GOODBY 1 3.7 3.7 48.1planning consultancies, SILVERSTEINresearch agencies, etc. Integer 1 3.7 3.7 51.9 Martin Ageny 1 3.7 3.7 55.6 Merkley + Partners 1 3.7 3.7 59.3 New York Nativity 1 3.7 3.7 63.0 PACO Ideation 1 3.7 3.7 66.7 Plannerzone 1 3.7 3.7 70.4 Prefer not to Answer 1 3.7 3.7 74.1 Razorfish 1 3.7 3.7 77.8 Saatchi & Saatchi 1 3.7 3.7 81.5 Studio One 1 3.7 3.7 85.2 The PARAGRAPH 1 3.7 3.7 88.9 Project Twitter 1 3.7 3.7 92.6 Voskhod creative 1 3.7 3.7 96.3 agency Zulu Alpha Kilo 1 3.7 3.7 100.0 Total 27 100.0 100.0
  9. 9. MotivationsNow to the interesting stuff…
  10. 10. What motivates you the most in your job as a Planner? #1 People #2 Challenge #3 Camaraderie #4 Learning #5 Problem solving #6 Competition #7 Chance to make a difference in the world Agree* People; understanding behaviors and culture 11 7 100% Challenge; the novelty of new challenges 9 7 2 89% Camaraderie; working with creative, smart people 6 10 2 89%Axis Title Learning; constantly learning something new 9 6 3 83% Problem solving 8 6 3 1 78% Competition; winning businesses 5 3 6 4 44% Chance to make a difference in the world 1 7 7 3 44% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 5 (Most Motivating) 4 3 2 1 (Not At All Motivating) Majority (>50%) Agrees *% of answers that were either 5 (Most Motivating) or 4 (Motivating)
  11. 11. OK, not too surprising, I suppose. However, upon close inspection, there are some interesting observations: #1: Problem solving is more of a motivation the older the generation Problem Solving as a Motivation 4.8 (5=Most Motivating) 4.7 4.6 Average Rating 4.4 4.4 4.2 4.1 4.0 4.0 3.8 3.6 18-24 25-32 33-47 48-66 Age If you have any idea why this could be, I’d really love to hear from you!
  12. 12. Problem solvingThat graph was based on this data # Standard Respondents Mean Deviation Age 18-24 2.0 4.0 1.4NOTE: The mean for Age group >87 was ignored because it 25-32 7.0 4.1 0.9was comprised of only 1 respondent who—upon further 33-47 5.0 4.4 0.5 48-66 3.0 4.7 0.6investigation—likely selected the wrong age group. 67-87 0.0 0.0 0.0 >87 1.0 2.0 0.0 Problem Solving Ratings by Age Group 18-24 1 0 1 0As you can see, although the data points 25-32 3 2 2 0are limited, respondents tended to rate Age 33-47 2 3 0Problem Solving higher the older the age 48-66 2 1 0group. 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 5 4 3 2 1 Chi-Square Tests Asymp. Sig.This correlation between Age and Problem Value a df (2-sided) Pearson Chi- 23.361 12 .025Solving is also statistically significant Square Likelihood 14.262 12 .284(p<0.05). Ratio N of Valid 18 Cases a. 20 cells (100.0%) have expected count less than 5. The minimum expected count is .06.
  13. 13. Also,#2: Competition is most motivating (>3 rating) for Millennials and Boomers Competition as a Motivation Average Rating by Age Group 18-24 4.5Millennials 25-32 3.4 Age Group 33-47 2.8Boomers 48-66 3.7 0.0 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 Rating (5=Most Motivating)
  14. 14. Competition; winning businesses StandardThat graph was based on this data 48-66 Mean 3.7 Deviation 1.5 Count 3.0 Maximum Minimum 5.0 2.0 33-47 2.8 0.8 5.0 4.0 2.0 25-32 3.4 1.1 7.0 5.0 2.0 18-24 4.5 0.7 2.0 5.0 4.0Assessing the raw data, even though the data points (participants per age group) werelimited, the phenomenon of challenge being more of a motivation amongst Millenialsand Boomers (but not Gen Xers) is still apparent: Challenge as a Motivation Ratings Breakdown by Age Group % Agree* 18-24 1 1 0 100% Millennials 25-32 2 0 4 1 29% Age 33-47 0 1 2 2 20% 48-66 1 1 0 1 Boomers 67% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 5 4 3 2 *% of answers that were either 5 (Most Motivating) or 4 (Motivating)
  15. 15. Attitudes Based on the aforementioned pre-surveyinterviews, I devised a list of theorized “insights” to test/validate in this study. The following is a presentation of the surveyresults, followed by analyses of their implications on planners’ attitudes.
  16. 16. Most of the statements tested were perceived to be “true”  11 out of 15 statements had ≥50% Agreement rate How true is that? (Statements in order of highest Agreement rate to lowest) % Agree*J) The best discoveries are often made when youre not looking for them 9 16 2 93% I) Being straightforwardly honest is liberating 13 12 2 93% C) Being comfortable with feeling uncomfortable is key to innovation 12 11 1 3 85% B) The best thing about travelling isnt the things you see, but the… 13 10 2 1 1 85% O) Being an outsider can give you a more acute perspective 6 7 2 1 81% M) Discovering truths that are valid across cultures is rewarding 10 11 4 1 1 78% L) Being known is not as powerful as being invaluable 12 7 5 2 1 70% E) There is a child in every adult 9 10 5 3 70% D) Your greatest competition is yourself 9 9 7 1 1 67% A) Anything is possible until proven otherwise 9 9 5 1 3 67% N) People take pictures to preserve memories 2 7 5 3 1 50% G) Mastering many things is more fulfilling than specializing in one 2 11 8 4 2 48% K) Differences are seen; similarities are discovered 5 4 8 7 3 33% H) The Rolling Stones are cooler than The Beatles 3 5 8 5 6 30% F) Every challenge posed is an invitation pending acceptance 3 5 15 3 1 30% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 5 (Very True) 4 3 2 1 (Not True At All) Majority Agrees *% of answers that were either 5 (Very True) or 4 (True)
  17. 17. Challenge % Agree* A) Anything is possible until proven otherwise 9 9 5 1 3 67% D) Your greatest competition is yourself 9 9 7 1 1 67% F) Every challenge posed is an invitation pending acceptance 3 5 15 3 1 30%G) Mastering many things is more fulfilling than specializing in 2 11 8 4 2 one 48% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 5 (Very True) 4 3 2 1 (Not True At All) *% of answers that were either 5 (Very True) or 4 (True)  Participants ambitiously agreed with notions of “anything is possible” (67%, n=18) and that “your greatest competition is yourself ” (67%, n=18).  Most of those who understood statement F (not the 15 participants who rated it 3) agreed that challenges are enticing; 30% (n=8) deemed it true, while only 15% (n=4) did not.  There was only a moderate desire to be a “jack of all trades” (only 48% agreed to statement G).
  18. 18. Discovery % Agree*J) The best discoveries are often made when youre not looking 9 16 2 0 93% for them K) Differences are seen; similarities are discovered 5 4 8 7 3 33%M) Discovering truths that are valid across cultures is rewarding 10 11 4 1 1 78% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 5 (Very True) 4 3 2 1 (Not True At All) *% of answers that were either 5 (Very True) or 4 (True)  Participants strongly agreed that “the best discoveries are made when you’re not looking for them” (93%, n=25). Annoying how fate works that way sometimes, isn’t it?  Discovering cross-cultural truths is a rewarding experience for most participants (Statement M; 78%, n=21). Good to know that most planners are interested in cross-cultural communications!
  19. 19. Perspective % Agree*B) The best thing about travelling is not the things you 13 10 2 11 85% see, but the perspectives you gain O) Being an outsider can give you a more acute 6 7 2 10 perspective 81% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 5 (Very True) 4 3 2 1 (Not True At All) *% of answers that were either 5 (Very True) or 4 (True) Participants generally agreed (85%, n=23) on the value of perspective in travels, and that a more acute perspective can be attained by being an outsider (81%, n=13). Probably explains why planners seem to love reflecting on their travels! I wonder if planners actively use any particular methods to maintain that fresh “outsiders’ perspective”…
  20. 20. Ad work % Agree*C) Being comfortable with feeling uncomfortable is key 12 11 10 3 to innovation 85% L) Being known is not as powerful as being invaluable 12 7 5 2 1 70% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 5 (Very True) 4 3 2 1 (Not True At All) *% of answers that were either 5 (Very True) or 4 (True)  On innovation, participants strongly agreed that one needs to be comfortable with feeling uncomfortable in order to achieve it (85%, n=23).  Being invaluable or useful to others is more powerful than being popular or recognized (70%, n=19). This appears to be an increasingly popular sentiment among planners with regards to the work that agencies should strive to create.
  21. 21. Self-expression % Agree*I) Being straightforwardly honest is liberating 13 12 20 93% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 5 (Very True) 4 3 2 1 (Not True At All) *% of answers that were either 5 (Very True) or 4 (True) One of my first observations with planners was that many seemed rather uninhibited in expressing their honest opinions (Not that it’s a bad thing. I find it somewhat refreshing). It seemed that many would rather risk discord in expressing their honest opinion than euphemizing it or staying quiet. Although the statement could’ve been worded better to emphasize the choice of being actively and straightforwardly honest over being circuitous or evasive (after all, who wouldn’t find honesty liberating?), it was nevertheless found to be “very true” among most participants (93%, n=25).
  22. 22. Brand Associations  What brand(s) and—if applicable—agencies come to mind from reading the statement?  Brands with most # of mentions are plotted in the graph below. A) Anything is possible until proven otherwise - Adidas 14 B) The best thing about travelling is O) Being an outsider can give you a not the things you see, but the more acute perspective - Apple* 12 perspectives you gain - HSBC M) Discovering truths that are valid 10 7 C) Being comfortable with feeling across cultures is rewarding - 8 uncomfortable is key to innovation - 6 McDonalds Apple 6 8 4 1 L) Being known is not as powerful 2 2 D) Your greatest competition is 13 as being invaluable - Us weekly* yourself - Nike 1 0 2 1 K) Differences are seen; similarities 1 8 E) There is a child in every adult - 2 4 are discovered - HSBC Disney J) The best discoveries are often F) Every challenge posed is an made when youre not looking for invitation pending acceptance - them - Discovery Channel* Nike G) Mastering many things is more I) Being straightforwardly honest is fulfilling than specializing in one - liberating - Avis* Google # Mentions*Since there were no common items mentioned for this statement, one was selected as an example. For the full list of responses, please refer to the Appendix.
  23. 23. Conclusions and Future Research So…what does it all mean? Am I done yet? Will the world be a better place??
  24. 24. So what?Planners do it mainly cause they’re: •Curious •Hungry for challenges Discovering cross-cultural •Love teamwork truths is rewarding. It’s important to: Planners feel liberated from •Have an outsiders being “straightforwardly perspective honest.” •Step out of comfort zone •Strive to be invaluable/useful vs. popular
  25. 25. There will probably be a Part 2… Areas for further research  Why is it that problem solving is more enticing for older generations? Is it due to the nature of our generational groups, or is it more a factor of life experience?  Why is competition less of a motivation for Gen Xers? Is that even really true?  Why do planners prefer blatant honesty more so than others?  How do planners maintain that “outsiders’ perspective”?  What about you? Do you have any queries you’d like answered?
  26. 26. AppendixTo view raw data from survey results, access appendix here.(Tables were too large to display clearly in a slide deck.)
  27. 27. Thanks for reading!If you have any questions or comments about these findings, feel free to contact me via: Twitter: @wendysungasong LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/WendySung

×