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Optical fiber 49871031
Introduce <ul><li>An  optical fiber  is made up of the core (carries the light pulses), the cladding (reflects the light p...
Introduce <ul><li>Fibers are used instead of metal wires because signals travel along them with less loss and are also imm...
Applications <ul><li>Optical fiber communication </li></ul><ul><li>Fiber optic sensors </li></ul><ul><li>Other uses of opt...
Principle of operation <ul><li>Index of refraction </li></ul><ul><li>Total internal reflection </li></ul><ul><li>Multi-mod...
Mechanisms of attenuation <ul><li>Light scattering </li></ul><ul><li>UV-Vis-IR absorption </li></ul>
Manufacturing <ul><li>Materials </li></ul><ul><li>Silica </li></ul><ul><li>Fluorides </li></ul><ul><li>Phosphates </li></u...
Practical issues <ul><li>Optical fiber cables </li></ul><ul><li>Termination and splicing </li></ul><ul><li>Free-space coup...
Electric power transmission <ul><li>Optical fiber can be used to transmit electricity. While the efficiency is not nearly ...
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Optical fiber 49871031

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Optical fiber 49871031

  1. 1. Optical fiber 49871031
  2. 2. Introduce <ul><li>An optical fiber is made up of the core (carries the light pulses), the cladding (reflects the light pulses back into the core) and the buffer coating (protects the core and cladding from moisture, damage, etc). </li></ul>
  3. 3. Introduce <ul><li>Fibers are used instead of metal wires because signals travel along them with less loss and are also immune to electromagnetic interference. </li></ul><ul><li>Fibers are also used for illumination, and are wrapped in bundles so they can be used to carry images, thus allowing viewing in tight spaces. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Applications <ul><li>Optical fiber communication </li></ul><ul><li>Fiber optic sensors </li></ul><ul><li>Other uses of optical fibers </li></ul>
  5. 5. Principle of operation <ul><li>Index of refraction </li></ul><ul><li>Total internal reflection </li></ul><ul><li>Multi-mode fiber </li></ul><ul><li>Single-mode fiber </li></ul><ul><li>Special-purpose fiber </li></ul>
  6. 6. Mechanisms of attenuation <ul><li>Light scattering </li></ul><ul><li>UV-Vis-IR absorption </li></ul>
  7. 7. Manufacturing <ul><li>Materials </li></ul><ul><li>Silica </li></ul><ul><li>Fluorides </li></ul><ul><li>Phosphates </li></ul><ul><li>Chalcogenides </li></ul><ul><li>Process </li></ul><ul><li>Coatings </li></ul>
  8. 8. Practical issues <ul><li>Optical fiber cables </li></ul><ul><li>Termination and splicing </li></ul><ul><li>Free-space coupling </li></ul><ul><li>Fiber fuse </li></ul>
  9. 9. Electric power transmission <ul><li>Optical fiber can be used to transmit electricity. While the efficiency is not nearly that of traditional copper wire, it is especially useful in situations where it is desirable to not have a metallic conductor as in the case of use near MRI machines which produce strong magnetic currents. </li></ul>

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