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Human Experience Design (Digital Summit Workshop)

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Presentation from a Digital Summit workshop series on Human Experience Design: Lean UX Secrets to Engage & Delight. Presented by Sarah Weise and Linna Ferguson. This is a 4 hour, hands-on workshop and slides can never replace the in-person stories and activities. We've tried to add comments throughout to give more description, but if you’d like to learn the techniques in more depth, we’d love to see you at our next workshop -- just visit www.techmediaco.com for dates and details.

The activities taught here have been adapted from Lean UX, Lean Startup, Agile, Design Thinking and more. The underlying thread behind all of methodologies today is simple: human connection. We hope that these activities will empower you to use them to build in pockets of empathy at work.

Digital Summit conferences are presented by TechMedia, the leading producer of regional digital forums in the United States, serving thousands of digital professionals every year.

Published in: Technology

Human Experience Design (Digital Summit Workshop)

  1. 1. Human Experience Design Lean UX Secrets to Engage & Delight Sarah Weise, UX Director, Booz Allen Hamilton @weisesarah Linna Ferguson, Creative Director, Booz Allen Hamilton @linnaferguson
  2. 2. Hello Slideshare Viewers! These slides you’re about to flip through are from a 4 hour, hands-on workshop presented at the Digital Summit conference series in 2014-2015. There are a number of stories and content not included here. We’ve tried to add a few notes along the way, but if you’d like to learn these techniques in more depth, we’d love to see you at our next workshop. Visit www.techmediaco.com for dates and details. Thanks for viewing, Sarah & Linna
  3. 3. I  want  to  tell  you  a  story  about   the  first  UX  project  I  ever   worked  on.  It  was  over  a   decade  ago,  and  it  lasted  a  full   year…  
  4. 4. @weisesarah @linnaferguson We  analyzed  customer  segments,  and   idenBfied  and  recruited  a  ton  of  users  in  each   of  those  segments.  We  made  sure  to  select  a   staBsBcally  significant  number  of  parBcipants   from  each  group  so  that  we  could  report  our   findings  with  scienBfic  precision  –  confidence   intervals  and  margin  of  error.    I  was  doing  t-­‐ tests  and  z-­‐tests  to  find  out  which   recommendaBons  should  go  in  Phase  I  versus   Phase  2.    I  even  remember  bringing  my  old   college  staBsBcs  textbook  to  work  with  me!  
  5. 5. We  conducted   our  research  in   a  lab  with  a   two-­‐way   mirror.    We   filmed  the  test   parBcipants   and  went  back   and  watched   the  tests   mulBple  Bmes,   scruBnizing   facial   expressions   and  body   language.  
  6. 6. By  the  end  of  the  year,  we  had  a  big  honkin’  report.     There  were  over  100  findings.    We  actually  had  tables   to  group  and  categorize  all  of  the  findings.           It  was  in  a  binder  like  this.    With  a  cover  page  slaved   over  by  a  graphic  designer.         This  was  my  first  UX  job,  and  at  the  Bme  I  was  so   proud  of  this  report.    It  was  massive.    It  showed  off  all   the  hard  work  we  did.      
  7. 7. The best part… @weisesarah @linnaferguson Over  10  year  later,  their  website  is  largely  the  same.   Only  2-­‐3  recommendaBons  had  been  implemented   out  of  100+,  and  those  were  preRy  much  low  hanging   fruit.  
  8. 8. This  process  stole  a  year  of  my   life.  Countless  billable  hours,   your  taxpayer  dollars,   painstaking  work,  meeBngs   and  staBsBcal  nonsense.     Are  you  familiar  with  this   heartbreak?  
  9. 9. “The biggest lie in software is Phase II.” Jeff Gothelf
  10. 10. Why can’t it always be like this? Over  a  decade  later,  the  organizaBon  re-­‐engaged  us.    Some  of   the  very  same  clients,  actually.  But  this  Bme,  our  process  was   lean.    In  under  a  month,  we  had  a  substanBally  beRer  product.   With  far  less  work  and  hassle.  Clients  parBcipated  in  the   process,  and  became  our  advocates.       It  leW  me  thinking…  Why  can’t  it  always  be  like  this?  
  11. 11. PRIX FIXE MENU Data Gathering :: choose one Usability testing Create scenarios based on top tasks, craft post-test survey, and conduct 6 hours worth of one-on-one usability testing* Web survey Create survey questions to solicit preference data and discover more about target audiences* Existing data trends Evaluate existing data such as help desk tickets, web analytics, and/or survey data Focus group Plan and lead 6 hours worth of focus group sessions* Analysis :: choose one Expert review SME evaluation of select screens from a website or application Visual evaluation Analysis of branding strategy, colors, images, typography Task analysis Evaluate paths to streamline information architecture Persuasion, emotion, trust evaluation Evaluate how to more effectively move customers to take action Stakeholder analysis Based on a web survey, focus group, or existing data if available Pattern analysis Identify trends in existing data Benchmark Compare my site to my competitors’ * Recruiting/scheduling not included Presented in 2010 by Sarah Weise / Linna Ferguson, User Experience Professionals Association (UXPA) Now  this  is  not  the  first  Bme  I’ve  asked  myself  this  quesBon.  In   fact,  I’ve  spent  my  career  trying  to  make  UX  as  simple  and   effecBve  as  possible.       5  years  ago,  Linna  and  I  even  coined  the  term  “Express   Usability”  at  a  UXPA  conference  in  Munich,  where  we   convinced  a  whole  bunch  of  people  to  implement  UX   strategies  in  just  1  week  with  a  fixed  price  menu  approach,  an   idea  that  came  to  us  aWer  drinking  heavily  at  a  fixed  price   restaurant.  
  12. 12. PRIX FIXE MENU Deliverable :: choose one Recommendations report Details top recommendations based on our analysis in a finding-rationale-recommendation format Screen-by-screen findings report Points out areas on each page that can be improved Design concepts Pair with the visual evaluation: two alternate design concepts Information architecture recommendations Navigational outline or flow chart detailing enhancements to organization and page flow Wireframe(s) Visually displays layout recommendations; interactive prototyping may be an option if time permits Trend report Pair with the pattern analysis or benchmark; couple with stakeholder analysis if data is available and time permits Presented in 2010 by Sarah Weise / Linna Ferguson, User Experience Professionals Association (UXPA)
  13. 13. @weisesarah @linnaferguson By the end of the day, you’ll know 10 new techniques to cultivate EMPATHY. CREATIVITY. FOCUS. HUMAN EXPERIENCE DESIGN BEGINS WITH YOU
  14. 14. @weisesarah @linnaferguson In  my  opinion,  the  key  difference   between  Lean  UX  and  tradiBonal  UX   methods  is  the  idea  that  UX   professionals  are  NOT  just  advocates   for  the  user.    In  Lean  UX,  we  work  to   understand  and  define  the  business   and  product  vision,  and  find  where   that  intersects  with  customer  needs.         Let’s  say  we  find  out  that  users  need   bicycles,  but  the  goal  of  the  business   is  to  sell  unicycles.  If  we  don’t  take   that  into  account,  we’re  going  to  be   fighBng  every  step  of  the  way,  and   our  recommendaBons  will  never  be   implemented.  
  15. 15. Let’s meet. @weisesarah @linnaferguson
  16. 16. The Numbers Game @weisesarah @linnaferguson This  workshop  acBvity  demonstrated  the  pi`alls  of   mulBtasking,  namely  that  you  are  far  less  creaBve   when  you’re  switching  context  between  two  different   tasks.  
  17. 17. We think on autopilot. Multitasking makes us less creative. @weisesarah @linnaferguson
  18. 18. We lose a lot to context switching # of simultaneous projects % of time available per project Loss of time to context switching 1 100% 0% 2 40% 20% 3 20% 40% 4 10% 60% 5 5% 75% This  is  waste  !   Quality Software Management by Gerald Weinberg @weisesarah @linnaferguson
  19. 19. Who is an artist in here? @weisesarah @linnaferguson When  you  ask  this  in  a  kindergarten  classroom,   almost  every  hand  shoots  up.         Today,  we  had  1  or  2  hands  go  up  out  of  100.    
  20. 20. AGE 5 You used 80% of your creative potential. AGE 12 Your creative output has dropped to 2% ADULT Your creative output stays around 2%... Unless you do something about it! @weisesarah @linnaferguson
  21. 21. @weisesarah @linnaferguson Look  at  a  3-­‐5  year  old  classroom.    These  spaces  are   filled  with  fun  and  colorful  things  to  do,  see  and   touch.      
  22. 22. @weisesarah @linnaferguson But  then  we  end  up  here.    How  could  we  be  creaBve   in  a  space  like  this?    How  do  we  communicate  or   connect?      
  23. 23. 20-Circle Challenge @weisesarah @linnaferguson
  24. 24. Was that harder or easier than you thought? What was your approach? How did this challenge make you feel? Nervous? Excited? Anxious? Focused? 20-Circle Challenge Discuss with a partner @weisesarah @linnaferguson
  25. 25. @weisesarah @linnaferguson
  26. 26. @weisesarah @linnaferguson
  27. 27. Was that harder or easier than you thought? What was your approach? How did this challenge make you feel? Nervous? Excited? Anxious? Focused? 20-Circle Challenge Discuss with a partner @weisesarah @linnaferguson
  28. 28. Everyone can be creative. Use a UFB to cultivate creativity. @weisesarah @linnaferguson UFB  =  Uninterrupted  Focus  Block     This  is  a  way  to  protect  your  Bme,  focus  on  a  single   thing,  and  empower  yourself  to  be  creaBve.      
  29. 29. Creativity is a muscle. Exercise it. Commit to 5 minutes a day for 30 days. @weisesarah @linnaferguson Not  only  that,  start  your  UX  sessions  off  with  a  creaBvity   booster  like  one  of  these  acBviBes,  and  your  parBcipants   will  get  in  the  zone.  They’ll  be  more  focused,  aRenBve   and  creaBve  in  your  sessions.  
  30. 30. Doodle a picture Draw an animal Make something out of play dough Write a journal entry Find an interesting object from nature, and write 20 words to describe it Discover a new word, and use it in a sentence Do a crossword puzzle or word hunt Write a haiku Try a new food Pin an inspiring picture on Pinterest Build a tower with blocks or legos (I’m partial to MagnaTiles…) Find an interesting texture and do a paper rubbing 30 Days of Creativity Ideas for the challenge. Each day… @weisesarah @linnaferguson
  31. 31. Companies like 3M and Google give staff 15-20% of time to work on projects of their choosing Gmail Google Ads Post-it notes Masking Tape @weisesarah @linnaferguson
  32. 32. What creative habit will you start today? What will you try for 30 days straight? How will you bring this back to work? Creativity Write down on your note-taking page… @weisesarah @linnaferguson
  33. 33. Ok, so what’s next? How do I apply this to my work? How does creativity relate to empathy? Will this really change my life?
  34. 34. Let’s shift from personal to group creativity
  35. 35. 1. Mad Libs 2. Wall Voting 3. Target Priorities 4. Personas 5. Empathy Maps 6. Journey Maps 7. User Stories 8. Ideation & Refining 9. Usability Testing 10. Projective Interviews @weisesarah @linnaferguson
  36. 36. Rules can be your friends There’s no dial-in number Let’s maximize connection. Pure attention and focus. Humans only. The optimum number of people is somewhere between 4 and 20. No phones, tablets, laptops We have a short time with you. We have to focus! Goal is to generate a lot of ideas quickly There are deadlines and timers for each activity. Pretend you’re in an elevator Talk quickly and stay on topic. We have a parking lot for off-topic ideas to help everyone stay on track. We are not in the idea or ego squashing business We succeed through a breadth of perspectives and concepts @weisesarah @linnaferguson
  37. 37. The Story of Sprout Wealth @weisesarah @linnaferguson This  is  a  case  study  of  a  ficBBous  wealth  management   company  serving  a  specific  niche  –  those  with  a   minimum  of  $5M  in  assets.    You  are  all  founding   partners,  each  with  a  different  viewpoints  about  how   to  form  this  company.  
  38. 38. #1 Mad libs FOR: target customer WHO NEEDS: service/feature UNLIKE: alternative/competitor Entrepreneur Mobile app to check up on $ DIY investing @weisesarah @linnaferguson
  39. 39. #1 Mad libs WE ARE A: business type WE PROVIDE: emotional benefit WE STAND OUT BY: key differentiator @weisesarah @linnaferguson Financial advisor Simplicity High tech
  40. 40. •  Scribble as many ideas as you can in 2 mins (can do this as individuals or in pairs/groups) •  Ever person/pair/group must fill 5 post-its •  Build it, ideas will come – Put 50 stickies on the wall, and have people shout out ideas •  Everyone stands, shouts out 1 idea then sits, selects someone else to go A few different ways to capture ideas Brainstorming methods with a group @weisesarah @linnaferguson
  41. 41. AWer  wall  voBng,  move  the   most  voted  on  items  to  the   top.       You’ll  be  able  to  read  the   vision  statement  across  if   they  categories  are  lined  up.  
  42. 42. Write  out  the  vision   statement  at  the  end.     It  will  not  be  in  beauBful   prose,  but  it  sure  will  be   powerful.  Everyone  has   parBcipated  in  creaBng  this   straw  man  to  build  from…     in  the  course  of  an  hour!  
  43. 43. #1 Mad libs Inspired creative thinking. Ideas sprouted off each other. Everyone rallied behind ‘sherpa’. @weisesarah @linnaferguson
  44. 44. 1. Mad Libs 2. Wall Voting 3. Target Priorities 4. Personas 5. Empathy Maps 6. Journey Maps 7. User Stories 8. Ideation & Refining 9. Usability Testing 10. Projective Interviews @weisesarah @linnaferguson
  45. 45. #2 Wall voting shows trends & limits discussion to key points @weisesarah @linnaferguson
  46. 46. #2 Wall voting Who is our primary target customer? Wealthy old people / retirees Young entrepreneurs Average Joe with family inheritance Busy CEO’s Middle-aged, successful business people @weisesarah @linnaferguson
  47. 47. #2 Wall voting Who is our primary target customer? Wealthy old people / retirees Young entrepreneurs Average Joe with family inheritance Busy CEO’s Middle-aged, successful business people @weisesarah @linnaferguson
  48. 48. #2 Wall voting Who is our primary target customer? Wealthy old people / retirees Young entrepreneurs Average Joe with family inheritance Busy CEO’s Middle-aged, successful business people @weisesarah @linnaferguson Try  voBng  with  2  colors  –  green  for   agree  most,  red  for  disagree  most  
  49. 49. #2 Wall voting Who is our primary target customer? Wealthy old people / retirees Young entrepreneurs Average Joe with family inheritance Busy CEO’s Middle-aged, successful business people @weisesarah @linnaferguson
  50. 50. #2 Wall voting Who is our primary target customer? Wealthy old people / retirees Young entrepreneurs Average Joe with family inheritance Busy CEO’s Middle-aged, successful business people @weisesarah @linnaferguson When  everyone  adds  their   votes,  which  ones  do  we   need  to  discuss?    VoBng   saves  Bme!  
  51. 51. #2 Wall voting can also take place over time @weisesarah @linnaferguson
  52. 52. #3 Wall target helps visualize and narrow key priorities @weisesarah @linnaferguson Here’s a twist! Have a team prioritize in silence.
  53. 53. #3 Wall target helps visualize and narrow key priorities Entrepreneur Wealthy retirees Average Joe with Inheritance Busy CEO’s @weisesarah @linnaferguson
  54. 54. #4 Personas instantly create empathy @weisesarah @linnaferguson When I was 10 my father had a heart attack in front of me. From then I vowed to be prepared if that situation ever happened again. This  is  Bill  Winters.  Bill  is  an  EMT  in  his  early  40s.  When   he  was  10  years  old,  his  father  had  a  heart  aRack  in   front  of  him.  From  that  point  on,  he  vowed  to  always  be   prepared.  This  inspired  him  to  become  the  EMT  he  is   today.    Bill  has  2  teenage  daughters  and  even  though   he’s  divorced  and  only  sees  them  on  the  weekends,   he’s  always  sharing  his  knowledge  with  them  and   insBlling  them  with  a  sense  of  preparaBon.    He  enjoys   grilling  with  on  Sunday  aWernoons,  and  trying  out   grilling  apps  on  his  tablet.  Bill  was  extremely  influenBal   in  redesigning  FIrstResponder.gov.       But  there’s  one  thing  I  haven’t  told  you  about  Bill.     He’s  100%  fake.    
  55. 55. Description Goals & Needs Tech Usage (Laptop / Tablet / Phone / Favorite apps…) Picture (Yes, draw it!) Age: Gender: Occupation: #4 Personas Customer Name:
  56. 56. We  love  all  the  sketches  our   parBcipants  do  in  this   workshop!  
  57. 57. #4 Personas make a post-it come to life @weisesarah @linnaferguson See  how  this  one  (from  a  real  client)   looks  preRy  much  the  same?         We  do  this  idenBcal  acBvity  with  our   clients,  and  it  really  works!  
  58. 58. #4 Personas make a post-it come to life @weisesarah @linnaferguson Yes!    We  totally  agree.     Thanks  for  the  shout-­‐out,   Michael.         We’re  big  fans  of  personas.   Let’s  help  our  clients  make   these  pieces  of  paper  come   to  life  so  that  they  can  help   drive  business  decisions.    
  59. 59. #4 Personas can be paired with wall voting @weisesarah @linnaferguson
  60. 60. #4 Personas can be used to role play @weisesarah @linnaferguson
  61. 61. #4 Personas can quickly state what resonates (and what doesn’t) for this customer @weisesarah @linnaferguson
  62. 62. #4 Personas can be visual Check out what’s on Amy’s work station @weisesarah @linnaferguson
  63. 63. #5 Empathy maps let you quickly connect with users Design Thinking Action Lab 2013 @weisesarah @linnaferguson
  64. 64. #5 Empathy maps can be put into context @weisesarah @linnaferguson
  65. 65. #6 Journey maps follow a user’s steps to document experience Or  to  streamline  it!  
  66. 66. #6 Journey maps applied to websites = task analysis 30+ screens to apply for a job! Using this, we streamlined USAJobs.gov to 9 screens. @weisesarah @linnaferguson
  67. 67. #7 Write-and-pass user stories generate perspectives @weisesarah @linnaferguson
  68. 68. #7 User stories I am a YOUNG ENTREPRENEUR I want to…. So that I can… 71 Never have to meet in person Spend my time growing my business Exclusively use a phone/tablet app Never be bound to a desk Round  1:  Write  a  full  line  at  a  Bme.  
  69. 69. #7 User stories I am a YOUNG ENTREPRENEUR I want to…. So that I can… 72 Spend my time growing my business Get VC funding to expand internationally Retire at 45 Save the world Give workshops at Digital Summit Meet a girl Truly create a double bottom line company Buy a jet Bring on a managing partner Leave a legacy to Georgetown University (Hoya Saxa Round  2:  Fill  out  the  “So  that  I   can…”  side  only.  Get  to  the   boRom  of  what  does  this  person   want  to  do.         Then  swap  papers  and  fill  out  the   “I  want  to…”  secBon  for   somebody  else’s  “So  that  I  can”   lines.     Did  you  get  more  creaBve   features/services  offered  as   soluBons  (the  “I  want  to”  side)  in   this  round  when  you  had  to  think   of  a  soluBon  for  an  issue  instead   of  thinking  about  the  soluBon   first,  then  jusBfying  it  with  why   the  user  wants  it?  
  70. 70. What will you take away from this? How might you apply this at work? Do you have a specific project in mind? #7 Write-and-pass user stories Discuss with a partner…
  71. 71. #8 Ideation generates lots of ideas and gets people out of “ruts” @weisesarah @linnaferguson
  72. 72. #8 Ideation can be encouraged with prompts @weisesarah @linnaferguson Try this! Generate 5-10 solutions using the following prompts… The most obvious solutions: ___________________________________________ By adding, removing or modifying these: _________________________________ If you were a 5 year old: ______________________________________________ If you were a rebellious teenager: ______________________________________ If you had unlimited budget: ___________________________________________ If you couldn’t spend a dime: __________________________________________ With superhuman powers (invisibility, teleportation, etc): ___________________ If you were <Persona Name>: __________________________________________
  73. 73. #8 Ideation can build off a persona @weisesarah @linnaferguson Brianne (New Hire) Dalton (Supervisor) Portia (Mid Level Worker Bee) Aiden (Learning Leader)
  74. 74. @weisesarah @linnaferguson #8 Ideation can build off a persona
  75. 75. #8 Ideation refinement pulls best elements from each idea @weisesarah @linnaferguson
  76. 76. What will you take away from this? How might you apply this at work? Do you have a specific project in mind? #8 Ideation Write down on your note-taking page…
  77. 77. #9 Usability testing shows what real, live users experience Moderated Un-moderated USABILITY TESTING Open-ended Scenario-based @weisesarah @linnaferguson
  78. 78. #9 Usability testing Structure for moderated, scenario-based testing @weisesarah @linnaferguson 1.  Opening script 2.  Intro questions Warmup / baseline data / recall last time 3.  First impressions Without clicking, what are your first impressions? How does it make you feel? 4.  Scenarios At the end of each, ask for a rating of difficulty or ease. 1 = very difficult; 5 = very easy 5.  Post-test questions Level of agreement with statements; open-ended questions; tester rating of web savvy
  79. 79. #9 Usability testing Opening script @weisesarah @linnaferguson Thank you for volunteering to participate in this study. To begin, I need to read an orientation script to you. I’m reading it directly so that all participants receive identical instructions. <Company name> is working to improve its website, and today they are collecting feedback directly from users like you. The input gathered here today will help identify what works well, and what needs improvement. In this session, I'll first ask a few questions about your first impressions. After that, I'll present you with scenarios that ask you to locate information on the site. Please speak aloud as you navigate, telling me what's going through your mind as you decide where to go or what to click, as if you were on a game show. This study is in no way a test of you, your skills, or your knowledge. It's a test of the system. If you feel frustrated because you can’t find something or don’t know where to go, please let me know because this will help identify areas of the website that need improvement. Since I'm here as a neutral observer, though, I won't be able to give you hints about where to go or what to click. The data from this study will be presented in aggregate form only, and your name will not be tied to your responses. I’ll also mention that I’ve been hired just to conduct these studies and did not build or design this site in any way, so you won’t be hurting my feelings by critiquing the site. The most important thing is to be honest about what works for you and what doesn't, so we can fix it. Questions at this point?
  80. 80. #9 Usability testing Intro/baseline questions… some examples @weisesarah @linnaferguson •  How often do you use the XYZ website? •  How do you feel about the current site? •  When you've come to the site in the past, are you typically looking for something in particular, or just browsing? •  What pages do you have bookmarked? •  How do you typically come to the site? For instance, do you navigate directly to the URL, do you click a link you've previously bookmarked, or do you find a page from this site after you've Googled something? •  Based on your past experiences, how helpful has the XYZ site been to you? 1 = Not at all helpful, 5 = Very helpful
  81. 81. #9 Usability testing Intro/baseline questions… some examples @weisesarah @linnaferguson •  How often do you use the XYZ website? •  How do you feel about the current site? •  When you've come to the site in the past, are you typically looking for something in particular, or just browsing? •  What pages do you have bookmarked? •  How do you typically come to the site? For instance, do you navigate directly to the URL, do you click a link you've previously bookmarked, or do you find a page from this site after you've Googled something? •  Based on your past experiences, how helpful has the XYZ site been to you? 1 = Not at all helpful, 5 = Very helpful
  82. 82. #9 Usability testing First impression questions… some examples @weisesarah @linnaferguson •  When you look at the homepage, what are your first impressions? How does it make you feel? •  Based on your first impressions, how useful do you think this site would be to you on a scale of 1-5? •  Without clicking on anything, just scroll up and down the homepage and tell me what information would be most useful to you? •  In your own words, how would you describe the purpose of this site? •  Is there too much information on the homepage? •  What do you think of the layout / colors / images / labeling / etc. •  Does any of the text make you want to click to find out more?
  83. 83. #9 Usability testing Scenarios @weisesarah @linnaferguson •  Avoid saying the actual label of what you want someone to click •  Provide context with words like “Imagine” or “Pretend” Here’s an example where it’s vital: Imagine you are a soldier having your medical condition evaluated. You would like to know how your disability rating is determined, and whether or not you can stay in the Army. Please find this information. How it would read without the “Imagine” You are having your medial condition evaluated… “Huh? What? Are you saying I have a problem? That’s messed up, man.” •  Stay neutral. Try not to agree during a testing session. “Mmm-hmm” and “Go on” is better than “Yes” or “Sure” or “Right”
  84. 84. #9 Usability testing Metrics Task  compleBon   Perceived  ease     Time  to  complete   Post-­‐test  quesBons       (Level  of  agreement  with   statements  about  visual   and  funcBonal  aspects)   Comparison  metrics  
  85. 85. #10 Image-based projective interviews uncover deep feelings Fear Of the unknown For my life (helplessness) For my health and body For my family and kids For my home. For nature, environment, planet Protection For loved ones, especially kids Anger At the government @weisesarah @linnaferguson
  86. 86. I will try these 3 things at work: 3. 2. 1. Tweet your top takeaway to @weisesarah @linnaferguson #dsclt15 94 Mad Libs Wall Voting Target Prioritization Personas Empathy Mapping Journey Mapping Write-and-Pass User Stories Ideation & Refinement Usability Testing Projective Interviews
  87. 87. You now know new techniques to connect quicker and build better products, leaner.
  88. 88. BUILD. AWESOME. THINGS.
  89. 89. Sarah Weise @weisesarah linkedin.com/in/sarahweise/ Linna Ferguson @linnaferguson linkedin.com/in/linnaferguson/ Get the slides & handbook www.slideshare.net/weisesarah

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