Webinar Renewable Energy Session7

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Webinar Renewable Energy Session7

  1. 1. 1© 2010 Macademia Session # 7 – November 24, 2010 TODAY’S TOPIC: Concept and Contents Copyright Macademia 2010; Copyright on pictures as indicated; no unauthorized use or publication Funding Policies (and a glance at Biopower)
  2. 2. 2© 2010 Macademia Where are we now? Policies & BiopowerSolar PV Funding Solar Thermal SHP & Wind Interview Session # 7 – November 24, 2010 Future Challenges
  3. 3. 3© 2010 Macademia What we will cover • A Glance at Biopower • Political Support for Renewables • International Climate Change Policy • Before COP 18: Interview with Alex Saier Session # 7 – November 24, 2010
  4. 4. 4© 2010 Macademia Your visiting scholar today:Your visiting scholar today: Alexander Saier, United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Session # 7 – November 24, 2010
  5. 5. 5© 2010 Macademia • Typical forms and systems • Use of Biopower over milleniums • The Return with cleaner technologies • Main Types of Energy Conversion processes 11 A Glance at Biopower Our Schedule for Today Session # 7 – November 24, 2010
  6. 6. 6© 2010 Macademia • National Targets • Measures and Policy Instruments used • The Debate on the advantages and disadvantages 212 Political Support for Renewables Our Schedule for Today Session # 7 – November 24, 2010
  7. 7. 7© 2010 Macademia • The process under the Framework Convention • Tailwind for Renewable Energy Technologies • Interview with Alexander Saier, UNFCCC 3 International Climate Policy Our Schedule for Today Session # 7 – November 24, 2010
  8. 8. 8© 2010 Macademia A Country Before we start… B Data C Business • News from the Forum, Feedback from last session Session # 7 – November 24, 2010
  9. 9. 9© 2010 Macademia • Large variety of forms: solid, liquid, gaseous • In contrast to other Renewables closely linked to industries - farming - agriculture - forestry 11 A glance at Biopower Session # 7 – November 24, 2010
  10. 10. 10© 2010 Macademia • Generation of heat and light by burning firewood • Traditionally based on direct combustion • Industrialization led to replacement by fossil fuels • Still the most dominant form of heat generation in many developing regions 11 Milleniums of traditional use Session # 7 – November 24, 2010
  11. 11. 11© 2010 Macademia 11 The return of Biopower • More sophisticated applications with modern technology • Used for transport, heat and electricity generation • Crucial advantage: inherent energy storage Session # 7 – November 24, 2010
  12. 12. 12© 2010 Macademia 11 Bioenergy: Environmental Impacts • Potential impacts of Biopower - Organic particulate matter, carbon monoxide, other gases - Negative impacts of energy crops investigated - Importance of transport: potential negative impact on net energy production and carbon footprint - Use of Land and Water resources Session # 7 – November 24, 2010 Source: IEA, Renewables for Power Generation
  13. 13. 13© 2010 Macademia 11 Bioenergy: Environmental Impacts • Potential impacts of Biopower - Very suitable and competitive depending on region - CO²-neutral life-cycle, possibility of closed mineral and nitrogen cycles - Low-investment for co-firing of existing plants Session # 7 – November 24, 2010 Source: IEA, Renewables for Power Generation
  14. 14. 14© 2010 Macademia Session # 7 – November 24, 2010 12 Political Support for Renewables • Measures to reach objectives - Tax incentives - Quota legislation - Feed-in tariffs
  15. 15. 15© 2010 Macademia 3213 The International Process Session # 7 – November 24, 2010 • Many levels of action - City, region, state and national level - European Union, ASEAN countries - International / United Nations’, OECD’ level
  16. 16. 16© 2010 Macademia 3213 The International Process Session # 7 – November 24, 2010 • The most prominent example: Climate Change - 1992 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change - 1997 Kyoto Protocol to the Convention (2005 entry into force) - Several attempts to negotiation a successor agreement with binding absolute targets for major economies - Failure of Copenhagen summit December 2009
  17. 17. 17© 2010 Macademia • Discussion with Alexander Saier, UNFCCC 3213 Interview with our expert Session # 7 – November 24, 2010

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