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Innovation through Experience Design: Designers as Innovators

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The pressure to create amazing, groundbreaking product and service experiences has intensified within just about every industry. Entire industries are now competing heavily on larger, connected ecosystems, not just individualized experiences. Competing organizations are increasingly enlisting designers to help bring clarity to decisions supporting the what, where, how and when of it all. In turn, the pressure point becomes the designer.

Designers possess the ability to influence the creation and design of new products and services. Sometimes they’re even given opportunity to influence business model transformation. But, what about innovation? Do designers possess the ability to disrupt the status quo and become the innovator? And, are they ready for it? I think so. And, after this session I think you’ll see why too.

Together, we’ll examine the role of an experience designer as an innovator and the skills designers command that can engineer new business opportunity and effect social change. We’ll share examples, models and skills that you’ll need in order to lead the charge.

Originally presented by Jason Ulaszek and Brian Winters at Webvisions Chicago on September 24, 2015.

Published in: Design

Innovation through Experience Design: Designers as Innovators

  1. 1. INNOVATION THROUGH EXPERIENCE DESIGN: 
 DESIGNERS AS INNOVATORS
  2. 2. BACKSTORY
  3. 3. BACKSTORY EVOLVING ‘DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION’ 3 20+
 years ago Tomorrow Web Design Hardware Design Software UI User Experiences Digital Product Development Digital Corporate Strategy Customer Experience Systemic within the Org
  4. 4. BACKSTORY NOW A MARRIAGE OF BUSINESS + DESIGN 4 Design in Tech by John Maeda, KPCB http://www.kpcb.com/blog/design-in-tech-report-2015
  5. 5. BACKSTORY 2014 STUDY: 16 INVESTING IN DESIGN 5
  6. 6. BACKSTORY EACH SHARE SIX CHARACTERISTICS ✓ Publicly traded in the U.S. for the past 10+ years ✓ Design is a central, executive-led function and there is deployment of design staff and practices over all major business units ✓ Over time, they have increased design-related investments in the form of head count, infrastructure investments, and volume of projects. ✓ There’s a distinct and recognized operating model for design that promotes cooperation and integration with other corporate functions such as marketing, R&D, and operations ✓ Design leadership must be present at the senior and divisional levels ✓ Senior management shows a deep commitment to design as a key strategic enabler and a resource for innovation and change 6
  7. 7. BACKSTORY OUTPERFORMED S&P500 BY 219% 7 2014 Design Value Index by Motiv Strategies (May 2015) http://www.dmi.org/?page=DesignDrivesValue
  8. 8. “ 8 Two activities that require a significant investment in time and require careful change management are process integration and scaling design across the organization. Once design is recognized as a strategic asset and integrated into the corporate hierarchy, it must develop a consistent, accessible operating model so that it can collaborate with other corporate functions such as marketing, brand, R&D, IT, operations, and manufacturing to extend and implement design work. 2014 Design Value Index by Motiv Strategies (May 2015) http://www.dmi.org/?page=DesignDrivesValue
  9. 9. BACKSTORY DESIGN’S VALUE IS FUELING INVESTMENTS 9 Buy talent $100M investment in building a massive design organization Develop organically Establish partnership Hybrid Acquisition of Adaptive Path Acquisition of Fjord Continued investment and alignment within organization to maximize design’s impact Invention company acquires Undercurrent to add design services. Example of an acquisition gone bad.
  10. 10. BACKSTORY FOR ORGS… IT REQUIRES A CULTURAL SHIFT • Focuses on users’ experiences - physical, digital and emotional • Creates models to examine complex problems • Uses prototypes to explore potential solutions • Tolerates failure • Exhibits thoughtful restraint 10 Design Thinking Comes of Age, Jon Kolko https://hbr.org/2015/09/design-thinking-comes-of-age What is a design-centric culture?
  11. 11. BACKSTORY FOR DESIGNERS… IT REQUIRES MATURITY 11 HONING CRAFT ESTABLISHING A POINT-OF-VIEW LEADING CHANGE QUALITY ENGAGEMENT INFLUENCE Tools, resources & process Selling design and rationale Design leading business
  12. 12. Aligning it all is hard. At times, stressful.
  13. 13. But, it is an amazing opportunity. And, if you’re crazy enough, maybe even fun.
  14. 14. So, what’s your role in effecting change?
  15. 15. What’s your role in leading innovation?
  16. 16. Heck, what’s innovation?
  17. 17. 17
  18. 18. And, how do you attack the opportunity to lead change?
  19. 19. INNOVATION FRAMEWORKS
  20. 20. INNOVATION FRAMEWORKS A DESIGNER’S POV: WHAT IS INNOVATION? It’s not just about new tools or applications, but is about bringing to life something that has never existed before. • Application: enabling and empowering organizations to approach problems differently • Populations: reaching new people and meeting previously unmet needs • Tool: creating paradigm shifts within our client’s organization and/or industry 20
  21. 21. INNOVATION FRAMEWORKS DEFINING ‘DISRUPTION’ 21 “The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction”, Clayton Christensen, 2nd Edition Chapter 17
  22. 22. INNOVATION FRAMEWORKS NOT EVERYTHING IS DISRUPTIVE Different companies need different approaches • Market-creating (disruptive) • Performance-improving (sustaining) • Efficiency (incremental) 22 “The Capitalist’s Dilemma”, Bever, Christensen, Harvard Business Review, June 2014
  23. 23. INNOVATION FRAMEWORKS INNOVATION FOR GROWTH How will you grow? • Growth type drives innovation outcome • Different approaches yield different outcomes 23 “Innovation Growth and Getting to Where You Want To Go”, Jacoby & Rodriguez, Design Management Review, vol 18 #1
  24. 24. INNOVATION FRAMEWORKS INNOVATION APPROACH Different outcomes need different approaches • Incremental • Evolutionary • Revolutionary 24 “Innovation Growth and Getting to Where You Want To Go”, Jacoby & Rodriguez, Design Management Review, vol 18 #1
  25. 25. INNOVATION FRAMEWORKS TEN TYPES OF INNOVATION A new framework for innovators • Integrating multiple types of innovation creates greater value • Innovation can have a systematic approach • Business value and viability steer your course 25 “Ten Types of Innovation”, Keeley, Doblin
  26. 26. CULTURAL UNDERSTANDING
  27. 27. “ 27 An organizational focus on design offers unique opportunities for humanizing technology and for developing emotionally resonant products and services. Adopting this perspective isn’t easy. But doing so helps create a workplace where people want to be, one that responds quickly to changing business dynamics and empowers individual contributors. And because design is empathetic, it implicitly drives a more thoughtful, human approach to business. Jon Kolko, Design Thinking Comes of Age https://hbr.org/2015/09/design-thinking-comes-of-age
  28. 28. CULTURAL UNDERSTANDING SO, WHAT IS YOUR CULTURE? What are your… • Shared assumptions? • Values that drive people & process? • Organizational structures? • Goals and incentives? 28 Keeley, “Ten Types of Innovation” Doblin
  29. 29. CULTURAL UNDERSTANDING COMPETING VALUES FRAMEWORK 29 INTERNAL FOCUS EXTERNAL FOCUS FLEXIBILITY CONTROL Adapted from Cameron & Quinn, 2011 Long-term Evolution Disruptive Change Short-term Performance Incremental Change COLLABORATE CREATE CONTROL COMPETE
  30. 30. CULTURAL UNDERSTANDING COMPETING VALUES FRAMEWORK 30 VALUES COLLABORATE CREATE CONTROL COMPETE CHARACTERISTICS Commitment People Teams Mentors Agility Innovation Vision Fail Fast Efficiency Timeliness Consistency Process Market Share Winning Profits Goals Friendly Cohesion Human-centered Participatory Dynamic Entrepreneurial Leading Edge Experimental Formal structure Coordinated Reliable Incremental Change KPI-oriented Aggressive Fast-paced Customer-centered
  31. 31. CULTURAL UNDERSTANDING EVOLUTION OF APPLE 31 Cameron & Quinn, “Diagnosing and Changing Organizational Culture Based on the Competing Values Framework”, First edition 1999
  32. 32. CULTURAL UNDERSTANDING LIVING INTO DESIGN-CENTRIC IS HARD • Large organizations have silos that introduce many ways to get things wrong. • Organizations can unintentionally reward the wrong behavior if incentives are not aligned. • Lack of alignment between management, product, marketing, legal, customer service, and IT can cause chaos. • The design process can introduce more ambiguity which is hard to accept because many organizations value repeatable, predictable operational efficiency. • Many organizations and cultures are risk adverse and transformative innovation is risky. 32
  33. 33. Let’s share some stories.
  34. 34. STORIES AND REFLECTION
  35. 35. KIGALI
 GENOCIDE
 MEMORIAL RWANDA
  36. 36. 36
  37. 37. 37
  38. 38. 38
  39. 39. 39
  40. 40. 40
  41. 41. 41
  42. 42. STORIES AND REFLECTION THE KGM JOURNEY (2014) 43 Pain Pain Pain Action?
  43. 43. STORIES AND REFLECTION THE NEW JOURNEY 44 Tania Singer Model: http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2012-07/12/tania-singer-compassion-burnout Pain Reflection Hope Action
  44. 44. 45 INZOVU* CURVE The word “Inzovu” means Elephant in Kinyarwanda, 
 the native language of Rwanda. * The Inzovu Curve is a model that maps specific designed activities to the emotional response of the individual experiencing them.
  45. 45. STORIES AND REFLECTION CONVERSION POINTS 46 Motivation and 
 ability to act ACTIONHOPE WILL EPIPHANY PAINPREPARATION EMPATHY COMPASSION HERO BURNOUT / SHUTDOWN REFLECTION Personal connection to the 
 experience of genocide
  46. 46. “It’s AWESOME. This is what we need.” Then, crickets. Then, some discussion. Potential plans. And, crickets again.
  47. 47. 48 NEW YORK
 
 CHICAGO AMSTERDAM RELEVANCE FLEXIBILITY INSPIRATION ACTIONABILITY INZOVU CURVE EVOLUTION
  48. 48. Finally, months later, they were ready to move forward.
  49. 49. WORKSHOPS WITH GENOCIDE SURVIVORS, KGM STAFF AND GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS
  50. 50. Physical environment Digital engagement Content and Education Revenue Generation 70+ IDEAS Basic Maintenance Simple Experiments Hosting Survivors Visitor Activation 4 CATEGORIES
  51. 51. Now it’s time to get to work.
  52. 52. STORIES AND REFLECTION THE KGM 53 INTERNAL FOCUS EXTERNAL FOCUS FLEXIBILITY CONTROL Adapted from Cameron & Quinn, 2011 Long-term Evolution Disruptive Change Short-term Performance Incremental Change
  53. 53. STORIES AND REFLECTION THE KGM (TODAY) 54 “Ten Types of Innovation”, Keeley, Doblin Funding strategies Suggested donations Visitor engagement (offline/online) Membership programs Deferred Maintenance Capital improvements Architecture / landscaping Role changes (guides) Role changes (guides) Educational programs Website Inzovu Curve integration
  54. 54. STORIES AND REFLECTION CAN YOU HEAR ME NOW? 56 “I don’t want revolutionary change, I want evolutionary.” “We don’t compete there.” (LinkedIn) “We’re not a platform.” “I don’t care what people say, I care what they do.”
  55. 55. STORIES AND REFLECTION THIS GUY DIDN’T LISTEN 57
  56. 56. STORIES AND REFLECTION CAREERBUILDER (CIRCA 2007) 58 INTERNAL FOCUS EXTERNAL FOCUS FLEXIBILITY CONTROL Adapted from Cameron & Quinn, 2011 Long-term Evolution Disruptive Change Short-term Performance Incremental Change
  57. 57. STORIES AND REFLECTION CAREERBUILDER (CIRCA 2007) 59 “Ten Types of Innovation”, Keeley, Doblin
  58. 58. BUILDING MOMENTUM
  59. 59. BUILDING MOMENTUM COMPETING VALUES FRAMEWORK 61 INTERNAL FOCUS EXTERNAL FOCUS FLEXIBILITY CONTROL Adapted from Cameron & Quinn, 2011 Long-term Evolution Disruptive Change Short-term Performance Incremental Change COLLABORATE CREATE CONTROL COMPETE
  60. 60. BUILDING MOMENTUM MAPPING CULTURAL VALUES AND UX 62 KEY SKILLS Facilitation Team Building Empathy COLLABORATE CREATE CONTROL COMPETE IMPACT ON UX Collaboration Rapid Prototyping Synthesis Measurement Communication Expertise Measurement Storytelling Execution Participatory design Mentorship on-the-job Process agnostic (dynamic environment) Adapt proven UX methodologies into the process Agile UX with results Customer-centered, but maybe not human-centered
  61. 61. RECOGNIZE THE ASK1 BUILD BRIDGES2 PRACTICE YOUR AIM3 LOOK BOTH WAYS4 DEFINE & MEASURE IMPACT5 LAYER THE EXPERIENCE6 KEY TAKEAWAYS BE HUMAN-CENTERED7
  62. 62. RECOGNIZE THE ASK Seek understanding for the motivations behind the growth intention. Match it with the right approach that fosters participation within the culture. 1
  63. 63. BUILD BRIDGES Take the responsibility to bridge the language gap between design and the business. Be the translator - great designers inherently possess those skills. Create opportunity for others to participate in the process. 2
  64. 64. PRACTICE YOUR AIM Carefully consider your toolbox of design skills and activities and match the effort to the ask. Consider activities that allow for testing risk and gaining buy-in on ideas earlier by leaders in the organization. Disruptive and incremental goals require different types of tactics. 3
  65. 65. LOOK BOTH WAYS Look both inside and outside your own organization and industry with curiosity. Innovation isn’t always new to the world, it only has to be new to a market or industry. Expose stakeholders/partners to the process of generating insights from observations. 4
  66. 66. DEFINE & MEASURE IMPACT Metrics provide the ability to defend your work. Map out the steps necessary to engage all the relevant stakeholders in adoption. Businesses operate on a variety of metrics, including ones you might happen to invent. 5
  67. 67. LAYER THE EXPERIENCE Consider creating engagement for all involved… the design of the product/service experience for customers, the experience of the process for your stakeholders and the enjoyment of the challenge and project for the design team 6
  68. 68. BE HUMAN- CENTERED Create or align incentives that enable the positive attitudes and behaviors needed (and celebrate them). Personally care. Professionally and ethically. 7
  69. 69. MURAKOZE CONTACT
 JASON ULASZEK FOUNDER & MANAGING DIRECTOR JASON@INZOVU.COM 
 BRIAN WINTERS CAPTAIN EMPATHY WINTERS.CX@GMAIL.COM

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