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November 2016 - ECN - You're Speaking Drupalese to Me

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A primer on navigating web in a technical land for event coordinators in higher education.

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November 2016 - ECN - You're Speaking Drupalese to Me

  1. 1. Navigating Web in a Technical Land Eric Sembrat You’re Speaking Drupalese to Me
  2. 2. Hi! I’m Eric.
  3. 3. Eric Scott Sembrat Web Manager @ College of Engineering twitter: @esembrat
 web: webbeh.com
  4. 4. Thanks for having me! Please ask questions at any time!
  5. 5. Note Some of this will pertain partly to Georgia Tech services and systems. Feel free to ask for clarification if I do not generalize enough!
  6. 6. Raise Your Hand If….
  7. 7. Raise Your Hand If…. You have edited a website.
  8. 8. Raise Your Hand If…. You have built a website.
  9. 9. Raise Your Hand If…. You are the lead to build a website for your event(s).
  10. 10. Raise Your Hand If…. You have been frustrated by something on the web.
  11. 11. Let’s get started! Please ask questions at any time!
  12. 12. Phase 1: Web Best Practices
  13. 13. Web Development 101 Most organizations, campuses, and institutions now leverage content management systems for building and maintaining websites.
  14. 14. What does Open Source Mean? Open Source just means that the product is freely developed, distributed, and supported by its community. It does not imply any security issues, vulnerabilities, or inadequacies. Much of higher education uses open source for web development.
  15. 15. Just Because It’s Free… The cost, rather than being on the product, is in the users supporting and building specific content for the system. Most campuses (like Georgia Tech) open up work created for the system to all of campus and beyond.
  16. 16. Find Out More… http://www.comm.gatech.edu/brand/websites
  17. 17. For Event Planning… Your likely budget for web development for an event is…
  18. 18. That Being Said… Our goal, then, is to make due with what services and features (on- and off-campus) we have! But before then, let’s consider a few things to consider when building a website.
  19. 19. 3 Main Points 1. Write for your audiences. 2. Do not reinvent the wheel unless necessary. 3. Organically organize your content.
  20. 20. Who is your audience? The primary purchase of your website is to appeal to your expected visitors and browsers. This allows you to shape and mold your website around those expected use-cases.
  21. 21. Who are your audiences for your event websites? Question!
  22. 22. Audience Keep in mind your key audiences (visitors) who will be visiting your website. All of your text, menu links, and photos should be easy to understand and relate to the website’s purpose. Keep acronyms, institute lingo, and technical gibberish to a minimum.
  23. 23. Writing for Audiences Keep in mind the mobile and tablet audience. These audiences account for 20-30% of your traffic.
  24. 24. Writing for Audiences Keeping mind how small these screens are for reading, it’s good practice to keep your content concise. Rely on standard methods of separating content (in-page links, menu organization) over long and text-heavy pages.
  25. 25. Resist Reinventing Remember that organization-provided web tools and resources are your best friend. Creating a custom theme or website layout is usually not an efficient usage of time. Most of your end-users will never complain about things being ‘too similar’.
  26. 26. Organic Organization It is imperative to structure your menu and page content to be easy to understand. In addition, don’t be afraid to spread out content between numerous pages. Remember to link where needed.
  27. 27. Organic Organization
  28. 28. Organic Organization It is imperative to structure your menu and pages in a logical fashion.
  29. 29. Organic Organization It is imperative to structure your menu and pages in a logical fashion.
  30. 30. Phase 2: Building Event Websites
  31. 31. Before We Begin. Let’s talk about some things that make an event website function.
  32. 32. What features do you hope to see on an event website? Break
 Out
  33. 33. Show and Tell
  34. 34. What features do you dread to see on an event website? Break
 Out
  35. 35. Show and Tell
  36. 36. Where to Begin? 1. Create a list of pages for your website. 2. Organize those pages into structured menus. 3. Begin writing content.
  37. 37. Determining Pages Think about what content you want to give out to your end-users on your website. You should ideally have one page for each chunk of content on your website.
  38. 38. Determining Pages Let’s consider a web development event: Speakers Registration Location About Us Traveling Sponsors Contact Us Become a Member Become a Sponsor Submit a Proposal
  39. 39. Creating Menus Once you have your list of pages, creating menus are as easy as stacking them under one- another. Common ways of doing this are: 1) Sticky notes. 2) Excel spreadsheet. 3) Whiteboard.
  40. 40. Creating Menus Let’s consider a web development event: Speakers Registration Location About Us Traveling Sponsors Contact Us Become a Member Become a Sponsor Submit a Proposal
  41. 41. Creating Menus Let’s consider a web development event: Speakers Registration Location About Us Traveling Sponsors Contact Us Become a Member Become a Sponsor Submit a Proposal
  42. 42. Writing Content Creating content (text, photos, videos) for your pages. A few key pointers for building attractive and engaging content.
  43. 43. Writing Content Large (full-width) photos work great for good photography.
  44. 44. Writing Content Large (full-width) photos work great for good photography. Can you determine what this is? Imagine being on a mobile device!
  45. 45. Headers Heading text styles allow websites to have hierarchical browsing for search engines, screen readers, and end-users to navigate.
  46. 46. Headers
  47. 47. Headers • Header 1 • Header 2 • Header 3 • Header 4 • Header 5 • Header 6 • Header 2 (1) • Header 3 (1) • Header 4 (1) • Header 2 (2)
  48. 48. Please Do Not • Use tables to structure sidebars, content. • Use unexpected color combinations • Use super small/undersized photos. • Use photos without providing ‘alt text’. • Use ‘click here’ link text.
  49. 49. That being said…
  50. 50. Fancy Things That’s where tools (plugins, services, web applications) come into play. These tools supplement your content.
  51. 51. Phase 3: Tools You Can Use… Today!
  52. 52. Tools Let’s discuss some tools and services that will help you make your website the best it can be!
  53. 53. What tools are other folks using? Question!
  54. 54. WordPress Websites Professional Web Presence is our shared WordPress hosting on campus. http://pwp.gatech.edu/ For non-Georgia Tech folks, consider using wordpress.com for a similar experience. https://wordpress.com/
  55. 55. SEO For Search Engine Optimization (SEO), most content management systems come with many tools out-of-the-box to help. Note that your content determine your SEO ranking above almost all other attributes. However, plugins do exist for your website system of choice to help.
  56. 56. Google Docs/Forms Need to get a simple form out there? Google Forms (part of Google Docs) is free, allows for exporting responses to a spreadsheet, and is mobile-friendly. Also worth noting that the Google Docs suite (docs, sheets) are great for collaborative working.
  57. 57. Google Drive If you need to share a folder between participants, Google Drive works flawlessly. And it also works out-of-the-box with Google Docs/Forms products as well.
  58. 58. Google Analytics The forefront in visitor, search tracking and statistics. Key for determining: 1. How visitors are getting to your website. 2. Where visitors are browsing to. 3. Time-sensitive traffic flows.
  59. 59. Google Analytics
  60. 60. Google Analytics College rankings released.
  61. 61. Eventbrite Eventbrite is the easiest way to manage tickets, registration for a (free, paid) event. Eventbrite also allows hassle-free attendee exports.
  62. 62. YouTube Use YouTube whenever possible for video. Benefits: 
 1.) Captioning (legal requirement). 2.) Cross-platform compatibility. 3.) Ease of use, upload, embed.
  63. 63. AMAC Need videos captioned or transcribed to meet legal accessibility compliance? AMAC ( http://amacusg.org/ ) provides low-cost accurate captioning to University of Georgia institutions.
  64. 64. Trello (project mgmt.) Need help keeping ahead of deadlines, projects, tasks, and deliverables for your event? 
 Trello provides small-team project management for free.
  65. 65. Well, that’s it for me!
  66. 66. Eric Scott Sembrat Web Manager @ College of Engineering twitter: @esembrat
 web: webbeh.com

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