Ed 521 Unit 7 Seminar

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  • *BREAK* View etiquette presentation while waiting for students to show up Place in chat while etiquette presentation is going: Welcome to our seminar. We will be starting in a few minutes. 3.Kick off: I think there is a little delay between when I say something and when you hear me. I’ll try to go slow. If I go too fast let me know by typing a note in the chat field. Can you hear me alright? (Wait for response) Okay, let’s get started. Please introduce yourself – tell us your name and what content area you teach or plan to teach. Paste in chat My name is Shirley Weaver and I'm certified to teach: Language Arts, English, Reading, Social Studies, TESOL, and Educational Technology Introduction: Great. Now we’ve reviewed what everyone teaches or plans to teach (use audio to review what everyone teaches) Does anyone have any general course-related questions before we get started. Tonight we will discuss: Assessment and how we can use assessment to improve student performance I prepared a presentation for us to discuss these ideas further. Please type a message into the chat field, when you are able to see the presentation. Instructor Presentation: (Load unit 5 presentation)
  • I prepared a presentation for us to discuss these ideas further. Please type a message into the chat field, when you are able to see the presentation.
  • As I said, we’ll be discussing assessment tonight and how assessment can be used to help learners. First we’ll talk about rubrics and how you can build them and use them and then we’ll talk about why you might want to use them. Next we’ll discuss why the two types of assessments (higher and lower) might require different applications of Bloom's Taxonomy as well as why they might require different strategies? Why might it be harder to evaluate lower-level thinking tasks (at the knowledge level, for instance) than tasks assessing higher-level thinking? Finally, we’ll examine two questions: Should you create a separate reading assessment for ELL students? Why or why not? How might classroom management play a role in effective assessment?
  • (read the slide) Figure out how to use survey tool. Ask: Do you find it helpful to have a rubric before you begin as assignment? Do you use rubrics in your teaching practice? Give students time to respond. Then sum up what they have written. Why would you want to use a rubric? Many experts believe that rubrics improve students' end products and therefore increase learning. When teachers evaluate papers or projects, they know implicitly what makes a good final product and why. When students receive rubrics beforehand, they understand how they will be evaluated and can prepare accordingly. Developing a grid and making it available as a tool for students' use will provide the scaffolding necessary to improve the quality of their work and increase their knowledge.
  • Rubrics can be created for any content area including math, science, history, writing, foreign languages, drama, art, music, any content area. Once developed, they can be modified easily for various grade levels. This slide contains some resources you can use to build rubrics. Rubristar is a well-known site. It’s free and you can use their templates to build rubrics, peruse the rubrics that other have built and store your rubrics. I’ve found it be very helpful. The teachnology site also has some rubric resources you will want to check. Last but certainly not least is Kathy Schrock. Her rubric site is chock full of good information about rubrics.
  • Here are five steps that will help you build a rubric Read through Does anyone have any other steps that we should consider? How do you go about it?
  • You might wonder why you might use a rubric. It is connected to the changing role of assessment and an increasing willingness to specify the criteria to the student prior to conducting the evaluation. Do you like to have a rubric to guide your work when completing assignments? The role of assessment in teaching happens to be a hot issue in education today. This has led to an increasing interest in "performance-based education." Performance-based education poses a challenge for teachers to design instruction that is task oriented. The trend is based on the premise that learning needs to be connected to the lives of the students through relevant tasks that focus on students' ability to use their knowledge and skills in meaningful ways. In this case, performance-based tasks require performance-based assessments in which the actual student performance is assessed through a product, such as a completed project or work that demonstrates levels of task achievement. At times, performance-based assessment has been used interchangeably with "authentic assessment" and "alternative assessment." In all cases, performance-based assessment has led to the use of a variety of alternative ways of evaluating student progress ( journals, checklists, portfolios, projects, rubrics, etc.) as compared to more traditional methods of measurement (paper and pencil testing). Many experts believe that rubrics improve students' end products and therefore increase learning. Rubrics improve student performance by clearly showing the student how their work will be evaluated and what is expected. Rubrics help students become better judges of the quality of their own work. Rubrics allow assessment to be more objective and consistent. Rubrics force the teacher to clarify his/her criteria in specific terms. Rubrics reduce the amount of time teachers spend evaluating student work. Rubrics promote student awareness about the criteria to use in assessing peer performance. Rubrics provide useful feedback to the teacher regarding the effectiveness of the instruction. Rubrics provide students with more informative feedback about their strengths and areas in need of improvement. Rubrics accommodate heterogeneous classes by offering a range of quality levels. Rubrics are easy to use and easy to explain. 
  • Bloom’s taxonomy demonstrates a progressive sequence in human cognition, from simple (lower) to complex (higher) thought processes. However, it does not account for one important factor: a temporal or chronological sequence. At different stages of the whole educational process, instructional purposes are different. Assessments should reflect such purposes. In other words when you are first learning about something you may need to start at the knowledge level before progressing to those higher levels. Time-consuming lower-level fact instruction at earlier stages will contribute to and guarantee higher-level thinking. Without assessment of lower-level thinking (that is, the students’ knowledge base and comprehension) at students’ earlier stages, instructors may not know whether students are well equipped to advance to concepts that require higher-level thinking and how far the students could go. Do you think it’s harder or easier to assess the lower levels? (Please type in easier or harder now? So, (student’s name) why do you think it is harder/easier. (Try to have a discussion.) His taxonomy follows the thinking process. You can not understand a concept if you do not first remember it, similarly you can not apply knowledge and concepts if you do not understand them.
  • Whenever I create objectives I like to have Bloom’s verbs in front of me. It helps me construct objectives for each level and think of ways I can evaluate it. This website may be helpful for you.
  • Ask the question and paste into chat: Do you think that you should create different assessments for your ELL students? Type your response in the text chat field. (Create a summary – try to get a discussion going) I think the rubric is leveled and can be designed in such a way that you can use the same assessment for regular students and ELL. The student is not competing with the other class member just with her own performance.
  • Ask the question and paste into chat: How might classroom management play a role in effective assessment? Type your response in the text chat field. (Create a summary – try to get a discussion going) I think that a project-based classroom that uses authentic assessment will have fewer management challenges than a traditional classroom.
  • We’re nearly to the end of our time, so let me open up the seminar to any questions that you may have about the content of the seminar or anything else. It is also at this time that I’ll review the chat log to see if there is any question left unanswered. Now is the time to ask questions about the content of the seminar or anything else about this class. (Go back through the chat log to check if there are any unanswered questions.)  
  • Ed 521 Unit 7 Seminar

    1. 2. Dr. Shirley Weaver
    2. 3. <ul><li>Assessment </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Assessment rubrics </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Bloom’s Taxonomy -- Assessing lower & higher levels </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Should ELL students have a separate assessment? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How might classroom management play a role in effective assessment? </li></ul></ul>
    3. 4. <ul><li>A rubric is an authentic assessment tool used to measure students' work. It is a scoring guide that seeks to evaluate a student's performance based on the sum of a full range of criteria rather than a single numerical score. A rubric is a working guide for students and teachers, usually handed out before the assignment begins in order to get students to think about the criteria on which their work will be judged. </li></ul>
    4. 5. <ul><ul><li>http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.teach-nology.com/web_tools/rubrics/ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://school.discoveryeducation.com/schrockguide/assess.html </li></ul></ul>
    5. 6. <ul><li>Determine the concepts to be taught. What are the essential learning objectives? </li></ul><ul><li>Choose the criteria to be evaluated. Name the evidence to be produced. </li></ul><ul><li>Develop a grid. Plug in the concepts and criteria. </li></ul><ul><li>Share the rubric with students before they begin writing. </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluate the end product. Compare individual students' work with the rubric to determine whether they have mastered the content. </li></ul>
    6. 7. <ul><li>Authentically assess student performance on a project </li></ul><ul><li>Improve products and increase learning </li></ul><ul><li>Force the teacher to specify the criteria </li></ul><ul><li>Promote student awareness of the criteria </li></ul><ul><li>Reduce the amount of time teachers spend evaluating </li></ul><ul><li>Easy to use and explain </li></ul><ul><li>What else? </li></ul>
    7. 8. The taxonomy follows the thinking process. You can not understand a concept if you do not first remember it, similarly you can not apply knowledge and concepts if you do not understand them.
    8. 9. <ul><li>http://www.teachers.ash.org.au/researchskills/Dalton.htm </li></ul>
    9. 10. <ul><ul><li>Do you think that you should create different assessments for your ELL students? Why or why not? </li></ul></ul>
    10. 11. <ul><ul><li>How might classroom management play a role in effective assessment? </li></ul></ul>
    11. 12. <ul><li>Now is the time to ask questions about the content of the seminar or anything else about this class. </li></ul>

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