From hunter-gatherers to rice growers Early Japanese History Matthew Ripley-Moffitt Cary Academy World Cultures
 
The Jomon Period: 10,000 – 300 BCE <ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Named for word  “Jomon” – “pattern of ropes” –  made by han...
Environment Provided a Wide Variety of Foods <ul><li>Acorns were a staple food  – boiled, baked or washed to remove tannin...
Jomon Era Social Structure: Local areas controlled by clans Clan – group of people descended from common ancestor Each cla...
Four Major Changes in 3 rd  Century BCE :   (arrival of Yayoi people from China and Korea) 1.  Move to dependence on wet r...
Yayoi Period Agricultural Changes <ul><li>Originally from east central China </li></ul><ul><li>Moved by boat from coastal ...
Yayoi Period Metallurgy
Yayoi Period Changes in Social Structure At first peasant farmers living in small villages Village chiefs exercised politi...
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From Hunter Gatherers To Rice Growers

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From Hunter Gatherers To Rice Growers

  1. 1. From hunter-gatherers to rice growers Early Japanese History Matthew Ripley-Moffitt Cary Academy World Cultures
  2. 3. The Jomon Period: 10,000 – 300 BCE <ul><li> </li></ul><ul><li>Named for word “Jomon” – “pattern of ropes” – made by hand – no wheel </li></ul><ul><li>Lived in permanent villages of about a dozen families </li></ul><ul><li>Small homes, tall watch tower and communal burial ground </li></ul><ul><li>Domesticated dogs </li></ul><ul><li>Planted flowers around their homes – accumulated pollen </li></ul><ul><li>No metal technology </li></ul><ul><li>Artistic earthenware; polished stone cutting tools; bow and arrow </li></ul>
  3. 4. Environment Provided a Wide Variety of Foods <ul><li>Acorns were a staple food – boiled, baked or washed to remove tannins – acorn cookies still a favorite in mountains </li></ul><ul><li>Deer, wild boar, salmon, bream, sea bass </li></ul><ul><li>Mounds of sea shells indicate shell fish was a major food source </li></ul><ul><li>Some yams and root vegetables – no large agricultural practice </li></ul><ul><li>300 kinds of foods have been identified in Jomon ruins </li></ul>
  4. 5. Jomon Era Social Structure: Local areas controlled by clans Clan – group of people descended from common ancestor Each clan believed in nature gods & goddesses – called kami Trees, rocks, waterfalls, mountains and other nature forms were the home of one or another kami
  5. 6. Four Major Changes in 3 rd Century BCE : (arrival of Yayoi people from China and Korea) 1. Move to dependence on wet rice agriculture for dietary subsistence 2. Use and make metal tools & weapons 3. Active contact with East Asia continent 4. Social stratification & emergence of political alliances
  6. 7. Yayoi Period Agricultural Changes <ul><li>Originally from east central China </li></ul><ul><li>Moved by boat from coastal areas to coastal areas </li></ul><ul><li>Grew rice in large, productive paddies – wet fields </li></ul><ul><li>Idea of ownership came with farming </li></ul><ul><li>Rice became main crop and food source </li></ul><ul><li>Eventually rice surplus became consistent </li></ul><ul><li>Led to growth of larger and larger towns </li></ul>
  7. 8. Yayoi Period Metallurgy
  8. 9. Yayoi Period Changes in Social Structure At first peasant farmers living in small villages Village chiefs exercised political and religious power Yamato clan chieftain called “emperor of Japan” Extended family groups made up villages Strongest clans gained “regional” control Growing difference between ruler and ruled clan elders evolved into village chiefs Circa 300 BCE Yamato clan strongest in Japan Large land owners at top of social structure peasant farmers at bottom

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