13<br />Service as the Core Offering<br />Copyright © 2010 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved<br />McG...
LEARNING OBJECTIVES<br />Understand why service is a key source of potential differentiation<br />Explain the characterist...
WHY SERVICE IS IMPORTANT<br />A service is a product in the sense that it represents a bundle of benefits that can satisfy...
Service as a Differentiator<br />Focusing on service and on enabling employees to effectively deliver service can be one d...
A New Dominant Logic for Marketing<br />Customers do not buy goods or services: <br />They buy offerings which render serv...
Characteristics of Services<br />EXHIBIT 13.1<br />Intangibility<br />Inseparability<br />CHARACTERISTICS OF SERVICES<br /...
Intangibility<br />A service cannot be experienced through the physical senses.  <br />It cannot be seen, heard, tasted, f...
Inseparability<br />A customer still can’t really experience it until it is actually consumed.  <br />It is produced and c...
Variability<br />Because it can’t be separated from the provider, a service’s quality can only be as good as that of the p...
Perishability<br />The fact that a service can’t be stored or saved up for future use.  <br />Perishability is a major pot...
The Service-Profit Chain<br />EXHIBIT 13.2<br />Reprinted by permission of Harvard Business Review, from “Putting the Serv...
THE SERVICE-PROFIT CHAIN<br />Internal Service Quality <br />Internal marketing, treating employees as customers, and deve...
Internal Service Quality <br />Firms practicing internal service quality are customer-centric:<br />They do the following:...
Satisfied, Productive, and Loyal Employees<br />Internal marketing must include the following:<br />13-14<br />
Greater Service Value for External Customers<br />There is strong evidence that attention to internal service quality and ...
Greater Service Value for External Customers<br />Customers set their expectations based largely on the evidence provided ...
Customer Satisfaction and Loyalty<br />Loyalty sparks:<br />High customer retention – low propensity to switch, as well as...
Focus on the Most Satisfied Customers<br />EXHIBIT 13.4<br />Reprinted by permission of Harvard Business Review, from “Put...
Continuum of Evaluation for Different Types of Offerings<br />EXHIBIT 13.5<br />Source: Valarie A. Zeithaml, “How Consumer...
SERVICE ATTRIBUTES<br />Search Attributes<br />Experience Attributes<br />Credence Attributes<br />13-20<br />
SERVICE QUALITY<br />Service quality represents a formalization of the measurement of customer expectations of a service c...
Gap Analysis<br />13-22<br />
Gap Analysis<br />13-23<br />
Gap Model of Service Quality<br />EXHIBIT 13.6<br />Source: A. Parasuraman, Valarie A. Zeithaml, and Leonard L. Berry, “A ...
SERVICE QUALITY<br />SERVQUAL: A Multiple Item Scale to Measure Service Quality<br />13-25<br />
SERVICE BLUEPRINTS<br />Service blueprints map out a complete pictorial design and flow chart of all the activities from t...
Service Blueprint for Floral Delivery<br />EXHIBIT 13.13<br />13-27<br />
Thank You, Please Visit Us At :<br />http://wanbk.page.tl<br />
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Chap013

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Chap013

  1. 1. 13<br />Service as the Core Offering<br />Copyright © 2010 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved<br />McGraw-Hill/Irwin<br />
  2. 2. LEARNING OBJECTIVES<br />Understand why service is a key source of potential differentiation<br />Explain the characteristics that set services apart from physical goods<br />Explain the service-profit chain and how it guides marketing management decisions about service<br />Describe the continuum from pure goods to pure services<br />Discuss concepts of service quality and gap analysis<br />Measure service quality through use of SERVQUAL<br />Understand service blueprinting and how it aids marketing managers<br />13-2<br />
  3. 3. WHY SERVICE IS IMPORTANT<br />A service is a product in the sense that it represents a bundle of benefits that can satisfy customer wants and needs, yet it does so without physical form. <br />13-3<br />
  4. 4. Service as a Differentiator<br />Focusing on service and on enabling employees to effectively deliver service can be one differentiator that is hard for the competition to replicate.<br />13-4<br />
  5. 5. A New Dominant Logic for Marketing<br />Customers do not buy goods or services: <br />They buy offerings which render services which create value …. <br />The traditional division between goods and services is long outdated. <br />13-5<br />
  6. 6. Characteristics of Services<br />EXHIBIT 13.1<br />Intangibility<br />Inseparability<br />CHARACTERISTICS OF SERVICES<br />Variability<br />Perishability<br />13-6<br />
  7. 7. Intangibility<br />A service cannot be experienced through the physical senses. <br />It cannot be seen, heard, tasted, felt, or smelled by a customer. <br />Goods can easily be experienced through the senses.<br />13-7<br />
  8. 8. Inseparability<br />A customer still can’t really experience it until it is actually consumed. <br />It is produced and consumed at the same time and cannot be separated from its provider. <br />13-8<br />
  9. 9. Variability<br />Because it can’t be separated from the provider, a service’s quality can only be as good as that of the provider him/herself. <br />13-9<br />
  10. 10. Perishability<br />The fact that a service can’t be stored or saved up for future use. <br />Perishability is a major potential problem for service providers.<br />Fluctuating demand is related to perishability of services. <br />13-10<br />
  11. 11. The Service-Profit Chain<br />EXHIBIT 13.2<br />Reprinted by permission of Harvard Business Review, from “Putting the Service–Profit Chain to Work”, by James L. Heskett, Thomas O. Jones, Gary W. Loveman, W. Earl Sasser Jr. and Leonard A. Schlessinger, March/April 1994. Copyright © 1994 by the Hardvard Business School Publishing Corporation; all rights reserved.<br />13-11<br />
  12. 12. THE SERVICE-PROFIT CHAIN<br />Internal Service Quality <br />Internal marketing, treating employees as customers, and developing systems and benefits that satisfy their needs, is an essential element of internal service quality. <br />13-12<br />
  13. 13. Internal Service Quality <br />Firms practicing internal service quality are customer-centric:<br />They do the following:<br />Instill an organization-wide focus on understanding customers’ requirements. <br />Generate an understanding of the marketplace and disseminate that knowledge to everyone in the firm. <br />Align system capabilities internally so that the organization can respond effectively with innovative, competitively differentiated, satisfaction-generating goods and services. <br />13-13<br />
  14. 14. Satisfied, Productive, and Loyal Employees<br />Internal marketing must include the following:<br />13-14<br />
  15. 15. Greater Service Value for External Customers<br />There is strong evidence that attention to internal service quality and to employee satisfaction, productivity, and retention result in stronger value to external customers of a service. <br />13-15<br />
  16. 16. Greater Service Value for External Customers<br />Customers set their expectations based largely on the evidence provided by the marketer before the purchase. <br />Customer Expectations Management<br />Do not set customer expectations so high that they cannot be effectively met on a consistent basis.<br />13-16<br />
  17. 17. Customer Satisfaction and Loyalty<br />Loyalty sparks:<br />High customer retention – low propensity to switch, as well as repeat business and referrals.<br />Customer advocacy – a willingness and ability on the part of a customer to participate in communicating the brand message to others.<br />13-17<br />
  18. 18. Focus on the Most Satisfied Customers<br />EXHIBIT 13.4<br />Reprinted by permission of Harvard Business Review, from “Putting the Service–Profit Chain to Work”, by James L. Heskett, Thomas O. Jones, Gary W. Loveman, W. Earl Sasser Jr. and Leonard A. Schlessinger, March/April 1994. Copyright © 1994 by the Hardvard Business School Publishing Corporation; all rights reserved.<br />13-18<br />
  19. 19. Continuum of Evaluation for Different Types of Offerings<br />EXHIBIT 13.5<br />Source: Valarie A. Zeithaml, “How Consumer Evaluation Processes Differ between Goods and Services,” in Marketing of Services,<br />James H. Donnelly and William R. George, eds. 1991. Reprinted with permission of the American Marketing Association.<br />13-19<br />
  20. 20. SERVICE ATTRIBUTES<br />Search Attributes<br />Experience Attributes<br />Credence Attributes<br />13-20<br />
  21. 21. SERVICE QUALITY<br />Service quality represents a formalization of the measurement of customer expectations of a service compared to their perceptions of actual service performance. <br />Service Encounter<br />Customer Delight<br />Moment Of Truth<br />13-21<br />
  22. 22. Gap Analysis<br />13-22<br />
  23. 23. Gap Analysis<br />13-23<br />
  24. 24. Gap Model of Service Quality<br />EXHIBIT 13.6<br />Source: A. Parasuraman, Valarie A. Zeithaml, and Leonard L. Berry, “A Conceptual Model of Service Quality and its Implications for Future<br />Research,” Journal of Marketing, Fall 1985, pp. 41–50. Reprinted with permission of the American Marketing Association.<br />13-24<br />
  25. 25. SERVICE QUALITY<br />SERVQUAL: A Multiple Item Scale to Measure Service Quality<br />13-25<br />
  26. 26. SERVICE BLUEPRINTS<br />Service blueprints map out a complete pictorial design and flow chart of all the activities from the first customer contact to the actual delivery of the service.<br />13-26<br />
  27. 27. Service Blueprint for Floral Delivery<br />EXHIBIT 13.13<br />13-27<br />
  28. 28. Thank You, Please Visit Us At :<br />http://wanbk.page.tl<br />

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