Chap006

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Chap006

  1. 1. 06<br />Understanding Competitors: Analysis to Action<br />Copyright © 2010 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved<br />McGraw-Hill/Irwin<br />
  2. 2. LEARNING OBJECTIVES<br />Recognize the importance of the competitive environment in shaping marketing decisions<br />Understand how environmental forces shape the competitive environment<br />Differentiate between competitors as defined by the company and competitors defined from the customer’s perspective<br />Consider how the competitor mix changes as companies evaluate strategic factors<br />Identify future competitors before they become a threat and recognize key elements in a competitor analysis<br />Apply competitor analysis to marketing strategy and develop a competitive intelligence system<br />6-2<br />
  3. 3. KEY SUCCESS FACTOR — KNOW YOUR COMPETITOR<br />6-3<br />
  4. 4. DISCOVERING COMPETITORS — STRATEGIC FORCES<br />6-4<br />
  5. 5. Summary and example of different Industry Structures<br />Exhibit 6.2<br />6-5<br />
  6. 6. Monopoly<br />When a market is controlled by a single company offering one set of products. <br />The monopoly company sets the price and controls product development. <br />There is little need to advertise a particular brand’s benefits as the company has no direct competitors, at least in the short run. <br />6-6<br />
  7. 7. Oligopoly<br />When there are few companies with standardized (steel) or differentiated (automobiles) products. <br />When the products are standardized it becomes difficult for any one company to break out and charge a premium price. <br />When products are different it is possible to have greater price variability.<br />6-7<br />
  8. 8. Monopolistic Competition<br />When there are many companies offering unique products in different market segments. <br />The difference between an oligopoly and monopolistic competition is in the number of companies operating in the industry. <br />Companies in both market structures seek to identify opportunities and create unique products that allow a price premium. <br />6-8<br />
  9. 9. Pure Competition<br />There are many companies offering essentially the same product. <br />Sellers lack the ability to create a price premium. <br />Marketing communication costs are low. <br />Profit margins are generally lower and sellers focus on creating cost efficiencies to increase profitability.<br />6-9<br />
  10. 10. DISCOVERING COMPETITORS — STRATEGIC FORCES<br />Supply Chain<br />Product Capabilities<br />Global Issues<br />6-10<br />
  11. 11. DISCOVERING COMPETITORS – THROUGH THE CUSTOMERS’ EYES<br />Customer Perspectives<br />6-11<br />
  12. 12. DISCOVERING FUTURE COMPETITORS – LIKELY CANDIDATES<br />Strategic Expansion <br />6-12<br />
  13. 13. DISCOVERING FUTURE COMPETITORS – LIKELY CANDIDATES<br />Channel Member Integration<br />6-13<br />
  14. 14. DISCOVERING FUTURE COMPETITORS – LIKELY CANDIDATES<br />Merger and Acquisition<br />Defending Market Space<br />6-14<br />
  15. 15. ANALYZING COMPETITORS<br />6-15<br />
  16. 16. COLLECTING COMPETITIVE INTELLIGENCE<br />6-16<br />
  17. 17. CHALLENGE COMPETITORS: VALUE DELIVERY STRATEGIES IN A COMPETITIVE ENVIRONMENT<br />Competitor analysis is an essential tool in creating customer value. <br />Competitor analysis focuses on the “big picture” and identifies overall competitor strategy. <br />At the tactical level, competitor analysis is much more specific. <br />6-17<br />
  18. 18. 18<br />Thank You, Please Visit Us At :<br />http://wanbk.page.tl<br />

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