Chap001

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Chap001

  1. 1. Introduction to MarketingManagement<br />chapter 01<br />Marketing in Today’s Business Milieu<br />chapter 02<br />ELEMENTS OF MARKETING STRATEGY AND PLANNING<br />chapter 03<br />UNDERSTANDING THE GLOBAL MARKETPLACE: MARKETING WITHOUT BORDERS<br />part ONE<br />Copyright © 2010 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved<br />McGraw-Hill/Irwin<br />
  2. 2. Information Drives Marketing Decision Making<br />chapter 04<br />PERSPECTIVES ON CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT <br />chapter 05<br />MANAGING MARKETING INFORMATION<br />chapter 06<br />UNDERSTANDING COMPETITORS: ANALYSIS TO ACTION<br />chapter 07<br />UNDERSTANDING CUSTOMERS – BUSINESS TO CONSUMER MARKETS<br />chapter 08<br />UNDERSTANDING CUSTOMERS – BUSINESS TO BUSINESS MARKETS<br />part TWO<br />1-2<br />
  3. 3. Developing the Value Offering<br />chapter 09<br />SEGMENTATION, TARGET MARKETING, AND POSITIONING<br />chapter 10<br />THE PRODUCT EXPERIENCE – PRODUCT STRATEGY<br />chapter 11<br />THE PRODUCT EXPERIENCE – BUILDING THE BRAND<br />chapter 12<br />THE PRODUCT EXPERIENCE – NEW PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT<br />chapter 13<br />SERVICE AS THE CORE OFFERING<br />chapter 14<br />MANAGING PRICING DECISIONS<br />part THREE<br />1-3<br />
  4. 4. Communicating and Delivering the Value Offering<br />chapter 15<br />MANAGING MARKETING CHANNELS AND THE SUPPLY CHAIN<br />chapter 16<br />POINTS OF CUSTOMER INTERFACE – BRICKS AND CLICKS<br />chapter 17<br />INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS: ADVERTISING, SALES PROMOTION, AND PUBLIC RELATIONS<br />chapter 18<br />INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS – PERSONAL SELLING, DIRECT AND INTERACTIVE MARKETING<br />chapter 19<br />THE MARKETING DASHBOARD: METRICS FOR MEASURING MARKETING PERFORMANCE<br />part FOUR<br />1-4<br />
  5. 5. 01<br />Marketing in Today’s BusinessMilieu<br />1-5<br />
  6. 6. Learning Objectives<br />Identify typical misconceptions about marketing, why they persist, and the resulting challenges for marketing management<br />Define what marketing and marketing management really are and how they contribute to firm success<br />Appreciate how marketing has evolved from its early roots to be practiced as it is today <br />Recognize the impact of key change drivers on the future of marketing<br />1-6<br />
  7. 7. WELCOME TO MARKETING MANAGEMENT<br />Marketing is the activity, set of institutions, and processes for creating, communicating, delivering, and exchanging offerings that have value for customers, clients, partners, and society at large.<br />1-7<br />
  8. 8. MARKETING MISCONCEPTIONS<br />Catchy and entertaining advertisements<br />Pushy salespeople<br />Famous brands and their celebrity spokespeople<br />Product claims that turn out to be overstated or just plain false<br />Marketing departments “own” marketing initiative<br />1-8<br />
  9. 9. MARKETING MISCONCEPTIONS<br />Marketing is all about advertising. <br />Marketing is all about selling. <br />Marketing is all about the sizzle. <br />Marketing is inherently unethical and harmful to society. <br />Only marketers market. <br />Marketing is just another cost center in a firm. <br />1-9<br />
  10. 10. Behind the Misconceptions<br />Marketing is Highly Visible by Nature<br />Marketing is More Than Buzzwords<br />1-10<br />
  11. 11. Toward the Reality of Modern Marketing<br />Marketing is a central function and set of processes essential to any enterprise.<br />Leading and managing the facets of marketing is a core business activity.<br />1-11<br />
  12. 12. DEFINING MARKETING<br />Peter Drucker, circa 1954<br />“There is only one valid definition of business purpose: to create a customer.”<br />Peter Drucker, circa 1973<br />“Marketing is so basic that it cannot be considered a separate function (i.e., a separate skill or work) within the business...”<br />1-12<br />
  13. 13. DEFINING MARKETING<br />AMA OFFICIAL DEFINITION - 1948; REAFFIRMED 1960 <br />Marketing is the performance of business activities that direct the flow of goods and services from producers to consumers. <br />1-13<br />
  14. 14. DEFINING MARKETING<br />AMA OFFICIAL DEFINITION - 1985 <br />Marketing is the process of planning and executing the conception, pricing, promotion, and distribution of ideas, goods, and services to create exchanges that satisfy individual and organizational objectives. <br />1-14<br />
  15. 15. DEFINING MARKETING<br />When compared to the earlier definitions of Marketing, the 2007 definition:<br />Focuses on the more strategic aspects of marketing<br />Recognizes marketing is not just a “department” in an organization<br />Shifts the areas of central focus of marketing<br />1-15<br />
  16. 16. DEFINING MARKETING<br />Marketing’s Stakeholders<br />Societal Marketing<br />Sustainability<br />1-16<br />
  17. 17. Core Marketing Concepts<br />Value is the ratio of the bundle of benefits a customer receives from an offering compared to the costs incurred by the customer in acquiring that bundle of benefits. <br />Exchange occurs when a person gives up something of value to them for something else they desire to have.<br />1-17<br />
  18. 18. For exchange to take place<br />There must be at least two parties.<br />Each party has something that might be of value to the other party.<br />Each party is capable of communication and delivery.<br />Each party is free to accept or reject the exchange offer.<br />Each party believes it is appropriate or desirable to deal with the other party.<br />1-18<br />
  19. 19. MARKETING’S ROOTS AND EVOLUTION<br />1-19<br />
  20. 20. Beyond the Marketing Concept<br />1-20<br />
  21. 21. CHANGE DRIVERS IMPACTING THE FUTURE OF MARKETING<br />Shift to product glut and customer shortage<br />Shift in information power from marketer to customer<br />Shift in generational values and preferences<br />Shift to demanding return on marketing investment<br />Shift to Marketing (“Big M”) and marketing (“little m”)<br />1-21<br />
  22. 22. Shift to product glut and customer shortage<br />The balance of power is shifting between marketers and their customers, both in B2C and B2B markets.<br />Not only is a customer orientation desirable, but also in today’s market it is a necessity for survival<br />1-22<br />
  23. 23. New Market Realities <br />1-23<br />
  24. 24. Shift in information power from marketer to customer<br />Customers of all kinds have nearly limitless access to information about companies, products, competitors, other customers, and even detailed elements of marketing plans and strategies.<br />1-24<br />
  25. 25. Shift in generational values and preferences<br />Impacts the firm’s message and the method by which that message is communicated. <br />Impacts marketing in terms of human resources.<br />Generational changes are nothing new. <br />1-25<br />
  26. 26. Shift to Distinguishing Marketing (“Big M”) and marketing (“little m”)<br />Marketing (Big M) <br />Strategic marketing, means a long-term, firm-level commitment to investing in marketing – supported at the highest organization level – for the purpose of enhancing organizational performance. <br />marketing (little m)<br />Tactical marketing, which serves the firm and its stakeholders at a functional or operational level. <br />1-26<br />
  27. 27. Shift to Justifying the Relevance and Payback of the Marketing Investment<br />How can management effectively measure and assess the level of success a firm’s investment in various aspects of marketing has had. <br />1-27<br />
  28. 28. Marketing metrics<br />1-28<br />
  29. 29. 1-29<br />Thank You, Please Visit Us At :<br />http://wanbk.page.tl<br />

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