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The Whakatane Community Hub Project: A New Model for Community Development

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The Whakatane Community Hub Project is sponsored by a group of social service providers in the small New Zealand town of Whakatane. The town is very beautiful but has some of the worst social statistics in the country. This project aims to address these statistics with a new kind of facility - a Community Hub, developed, organised and operated by the community for the community. Two designs were developed by local High School students and 2nd Year Architecture students from the Unitec School of Architecture in Auckland. It has the approval of the service providers, the local community, both Maori and non-Maori, the local and regional Councils, of all major political parties. Completion date is aimed at late 2015.

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The Whakatane Community Hub Project: A New Model for Community Development

  1. 1. THE WHAKATANE COMMUNITY HUB Also available at: www.tonywardedu.com/images/critical_practice/Hub-Design-Final.pdf A DESIGN COLLABORATION BETWEEN POU WHAKAARO & UNITEC SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE
  2. 2. THANKS We wish to thank the staff and students of the Unitec School of Architecture, and in particular the 24 Second Year students (of 12 different ethnicities) of the Whakatane Hub Project for their hard work, their talent and their brilliant design skills. Without them, this project would not be progressing to a successful completion. We would also like to thank the tangata whenua and the many Social Service Providers of the Eastern Bay of Plenty who supported us over the last two years, by attending our workshops, and by sharing their knowledge, their needs and their hopes for a better future for our community. We would like to thank the Whakatane District Council and the Bay of Plenty regional Council for their enthusiastic support and for their endorsement of our proposal. Finally, we would like to thank the many individuals and groups who make up the Whakatane Community for their faith, their resolve and their support. In particular, we would like to mention the staff and students from Whakatane and Trident High Schools, especially those who participated in our surveys and who worked on the design proposals. This has truly been an exemplary community development project.
  3. 3. COMMUNITY HEALTH Health is a multi-faceted, interactive phenomenon Physical Spiritual Mental Economic SocialCultural Environmental IntellectualPolitical HEALTH Is about building, nurturing, developing and healing relationships
  4. 4. COMMUNITY HUB NOT THIS BUT THIS Community skills, resources and knowledge A MULTIPURPOSE HEART AND HUB FOR THE WHAKATANE COMMUNITY
  5. 5. WHAKATANE: A TALE OF TWO CITIES • Sunshine Capital • Best beach • Unparalleled outdoor activities • Spectacular fishing • Highest truancy rates • Lowest academic achievement rates • Among highest unemployment rates • The second-highest child abuse rates • Highest family violence rates • Highest youth suicide rates • Among lowest income rates Why would anyone choose to live in such a divided community? The Best of Towns The Worst of Towns
  6. 6. WHAKATANE: A PLACE FOR EVERYONE “Healthy towns reflect healthy populations and cohorts, across the lifespan. Unhealthy towns reflect this in the untimely or premature deaths of its young and most vulnerable populations”. Dr. Cookson-Cox, Kawerau Youth Suicide Enquiry • In the community • By the community • For the community • Operated by the community DEVELOPMENT WITH A HUMAN FACE It’s time to address the needs of the community It’s time to build a community!
  7. 7. DOES WHAKATANE NEED A COMMUNITY CENTRE? A FEASIBILITY STUDY by Pou Whakaaro and Supporting Families January-March 2012 Project Manager Tony Ward BArch PhD. A PDF version of this report can be downloaded at: http://www.tonywardedu.com/content/view/481/95/ Initial Conception Study Framework • Brief National Overview • Provider Workshop • Public Survey • Location Study • Facility Study REPORT AVAILABLE AT: http://www.tonywardedu.com/content/view/481/95/ 2012 FEASIBILITY STUDY
  8. 8. RESULTS PRELIMINARY STUDY • Identified 104 Community Groups operating in Whakatane • Dispersed over numerous locations WORKSHOP 1 (Providers) • Desire to coordinate and co-locate, sharing facilities and systems • Desire to cut costs and be more effective • Initiated community wide survey SURVEY RESULTS REVEALED •bored and depressed youth •lonely and depressed elderly •adults with unmet social, economic and physical support needs •unmet needs of numerous community groups •a lack of coordinated transport and referral services WORKSHOP 2 (Providers) •Determined the need for a community facility •Supported development of a concrete proposal (Stage 2)
  9. 9. SURVEY RESULTS Answer Options Response Percent Response Count Youth (under 20) 59.0% 203 Adult (20-60) 31.7% 109 Older Adult (60+) 7.8% 27 NZ European 40.7% 140 Maori 19.8% 68 Other 9.9% 34 answered question 344 skipped question 0 RESULTS REPORT AVAILABLE AT: http://www.tonywardedu.com/critical-design-praxis/item/144-a-community-hub
  10. 10. What would you like to see offered in a community centre? Please check all that are of interest to you. Answer Options Response Percent Response Count Workshop space (art, yoga, weaving, budgeting, etc) 73.1% 79 Community Festivals 63.9% 69 Computer Centre / Internet Access 58.3% 63 Linking to Community services 58.3% 63 A place to get help 57.4% 62 A place to play live music 57.4% 62 Community Garden 55.6% 60 A cafe w/ a child play area 53.7% 58 Flea markets 50.0% 54 A place to learn how to use technology (computers, graphics, programs) 43.5% 47 A Place to Hang Out 42.6% 46 Somewhere to exercise and stay fit 41.7% 45 Somewhere to host a conference 40.7% 44 A rock climbing wall (surprisingly!) 38.2% 42 What would you like to see offered in a community centre? Please check all that are of interest to you. Answer Options Response Percent Response Count A Place to Hang Out 80.7% 163 Ten Pin Bowling 73.3% 148 A place to play live music 59.4% 120 Computer Centre / Internet Access 51.5% 104 A place to show and see special movies 51.0% 103 Free Shuttle bus to services 44.6% 90 Rock Climbing wall 44.1% 89 Community Festivals 38.1% 77 Somewhere to exercise and stay fit 36.1% 7336.1% 73 YOUTH What would you like to see offered in a community centre? Please check all that are of interest to you. Answer Options Response Percent Response Count Workshop space (art, yoga, weaving, budgeting, etc) 55.6% 15 A cafe w/ a child play area 55.6% 15 A place to get help 51.9% 14 Community Festivals 51.9% 14 Free Shuttle bus to services 48.1% 13 Linking to Community services 48.1% 13 A place to learn how to use technology (computers, graphics, programs) 48.1% 13 Community Garden 44.4% 12 Rock Climbing wall 44.4% 12 A Pla ce to Hang Out 40.7% 11 Computer Centre / Internet Access 40.7% 11 Flea markets 40.7% 11 Multi-Cultural celebrations 40.7% 11 Ten Pin Bowling 40.7% 11 Somewhere to host a conference 40.7% 11 Somewhere to exercise and stay fit 37.0% 10 Community BBQ’s 37.0% 10 A place to play live music 33.3% 9 Cooking Space 33.3% 9 A place to show and see special movies 33.3% 9 Dances 29.6% 8 Central Booking place for area services, sites, resources 29.6% 8 Commercial Kitchen (to make and sell cooked items) 29.6% 8 Monthly open mural space 22.2% 6 Childcare 22.2% 6 ELDERS Answer Options Response Percent Response Count A Place to Hang Out 83.8% 57 A place to play live music 72.1% 49 Computer Centre / Internet Access 66.2% 45 Ten Pin Bowling 66.2% 45 Community Festivals 54.4% 37 A place to show and see special movies 51.5% 35 Somewhere to exercise and stay fit 47.1% 32 Community BBQ’s 45.6% 31 Workshop space (art, yoga, weaving, budgeting, 44.1% 30 Multi-Cultural celebrations 42.6% 29 Flea markets 41.2% 28 Free Shuttle bus to services 38.2% 26 Dances 38.2% 26 A cafe w/ a child play area 36.8% 25 Rock Climbing wall 36.8% 25 A place to get help 36.8% 25 A place to learn how to use technology (computers, graphics, programs) 30.9% 21 Community Garden 30.9% 21 Cooking Space 30.9% 21 Linking to Community services 25.0% 17 Commercial Kitchen (to make and sell cooked items) 25.0% 17 Somewhere to host a conference 25.0% 17 Central Booking place for area services, sites, resources 20.6% 14 Childcare 13.2% 9 MAORI ADULTS THE RESULTS WERE CONSISTENT ACROSS AGE AND CULTURE
  11. 11. STAGE 2 THE COMMUNITY HUB: THE CONCEPT • Community facilities that serve both Kopeopeo and Whakatane. • That these facilities, if separate, be linked by a free shuttle service • That they include co-occupancy of a wide range of service providers at an affordable rate • That they include a centralised booking service for community resources (halls, etc.) • That they also include recreational and leisure facilities that cater to youth, adults and the elderly, both Maori and pakeha • That these facilities include: • A place to hang out for youth • A place to play and hear (and record) live music • A drop-in space/ a place to get help • A place for indoor and outdoor sports, including basketball, table tennis, badminton • A cafe with a free, safe children’s area available • A computer centre with free and fast internet service and available for education/classes • A workshop space or spaces to make and display art, craft. • A space for performances and dancing • A place to show and see special movies • A commercial kitchen • A community garden Such facilities would also be able to cater to: • Multicultural festivals • Community BBQs • Flea markets • Farmers markets
  12. 12. SOCIAL SERVICE HUB
  13. 13. A SOCIAL/CULTURAL HUB A Public/Private facility dedicated to mutual self-help with: • Social Services • Disability Support • Family Support • Budgeting Advice • Legal advice • Health support groups • Education • Adult Learning • eLearning • Leisure • Drop in space (Youth, elderly, young parents) • Fitness classes • Dance classes • Art Classes • Hobby groups • Indoor/Outdoor Sport and Recreation facilities • Fitness and Exercise facilities • Meeting/Exhibition spaces • Café and Childcare • Commercial Kitchen • Music: Entertainment, Performance and Recording • A Community Garden • Commercial Enterprises (Rockwall, Bowling Alley, skating etc.)
  14. 14. SUSTAINABILITY, ACCESS, INCLUSION Economically sustainable •Self-funding after three years Environmentally Sustainable •State of the art building •Carbon neutral Inclusive •Economically inclusive •Culturally inclusive •Ability inclusive Accessible to all •Free shuttle bus service •Time Bank •Green Dollar, •”Whakatane Fiver”
  15. 15. OTHER EXAMPLES This idea is not entirely unique. Here are a few illustrated examples from the past and the present: •Peckham Health Centre, London, 1935 •Te Takere, Horowhenua •Te Ahu Kaitaia •Nga Purapura, Otaki •Karori Community Centre and Event Centre
  16. 16. 1935 THE PECKHAM HEALTH CENTRE
  17. 17. TE TAKERE, HOROWHENUA • Library materials and resources • Free WiFi and access to the latest technology • Libretto Café • Visitor Information • AA Vehicle licensing and driver testing • Toilets and baby changing facilities • Lounges to relax in and spaces for study • Fully equipped meeting and function facilities • Exhibitions, performances • Family and local history displays and resources • A well resourced children’s area • Business, Council and Community support services. http://www.tetakere.org.nz Resources
  18. 18. TE AHU: KAITAIA http://www.teahu.org.nz/
  19. 19. Te Ahu- Kaitaia Opened 2 years ago 800 – 1000 visitors per week Accommodates: Council Offices Library Museum Computer/Internet access Weekend Movie Theatre Hall Meeting rooms Cafe Information Centre
  20. 20. NGA PURAPURA OTAKI
  21. 21. NGA PURAPURA OTAKI: INTERIOR
  22. 22. The facility comprises the following features: • 2x multiple-purpose indoor sports courts • 1x resistance training (weight training) and cardiovascular exercise room • 1x nutrition-based classroom with cooking and food preparation capabilities • 1x nohopuku room for collective kawa engagement (for sports, exercise and/or lifestyle modification-based kawa), whakatau manuhiri, karakia, pre and post-sport and exercise preparation and conclusion • 2x classrooms • 1x facility café with a primary focus on healthy kai and inu • Shower, changing and ablution facilities • Staff Offices • 1x mezzanine viewing platform overlooking the main sports court (also doubling as a warm-up area for sports teams) • 1x exercise science lab (located within classroom) • Facility reception, car-parks and disabled user access to all areas NGA PURAPURA OTAKI: ACCOMMODATION
  23. 23. KARORI COMMUNMITY AND EVENT CENTRE LIBRARY RECREATION CENTRE COMMUNITY CENTRE PROPOSED AUDITORIUM
  24. 24. ACTIVITIES •Alcoholics Anonymous •Community Lunch •Drop-in Centre •Karori Red Cross Branch •Mahjong •Gracenet Community Church •Samoan Assembly of God •Dayan Qigong •Exercise to Music - Low impact aerobic •Feldenkrais: (regain balance) Exercise •Indoor Bowls •Karate •Parkinson Wellington •Pilates—adults - various levels •Pilates/Yoga •Pilates •Tai Chi • ZUMBA •English for Speakers of other Languages (ESOL) •Homework Support Programme (Primary) •Brownies •PORSE (in Home Childcare) Music •Windmill Music for Kids •Plunket B4 School Checks KARORI YOUTH CENTRE •Pool •Table Tennis •XBox •Drop in, Hang out The Youth Centre is an integral part of the Karori Community Centre. It is staffed by a youth worker, whose job it is to work with Karori young people, setting up programmes and activities for them. Monday to Friday 3.00—6.00pm Fridays 3.00pm until 10.00pm. Open in school holidays 3.00—6.00pm—some outings arranged. It’s all about making Karori a better place for young people.
  25. 25. KARORI BUSINESS PLAN TENANTS •Wellington West Citizens Advice •Karori Community Toy Library •St John's Trust Op Shop
  26. 26. THE DESIGN GROUP 24 STUDENTS FROM 10 COUNTRIES •Iran •Iraq •Afghanistan •India •Pakistan •China •Chile •Argentina •Bulgaria •New Zealand PLUS 7 HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS • Whakatane H. S. • Trident H. S.
  27. 27. SITE NO. 1 EX-COUNTDOWN BUILDING KOPEOPEO
  28. 28. GROUP DESIGN PROCESS • Individual Designs • Group Designs (6 groups of 4) • Group Designs (4 groups of 6) • Whole Group Design • 4 Public Presentations
  29. 29. THE COUNTDOWN SITE PROPOSAL STAGE 1 STAGE 2 STAGE 3 Stewart street KingStreet PARKING COURTYARD WasherAvenue
  30. 30. STAGE 1 GROUND FLOOR PROVIDERS COMPUTE PROVIDERS (and above) ART CLASSES CAFĒ CLIMBING TOYS ELDERS PROVIDERS PERFORMANCE (Recording Above) SOCIAL SPACE RECEPTION NORTH GAMES YOUTH
  31. 31. FIRST FLOOR GROUND FLOOR NIGHT FROM KING STREET EXISTING VIEW COMMUNITY GYMNASIUM PROVIDERS COURTYARD CLIMB PROVIDERS Workout
  32. 32. COURTYARD Courtyard from the north West Gymnasium Community/Performance Space Courtyard from the North East
  33. 33. Bird’s Eye from the North East Explaining the design
  34. 34. HIGH SCHOOL SITE PLAYING FIELDS ALL WEATHER NETBALL COMMUNITY HUB ST. JOSEPHS GOULSTONE ROD View from North East View from East View from North West SITE PLAN
  35. 35. HIGH SCHOOL SITE GROUND FLOOR PLAN FIRST FLOOR PLAN Providers Community Education Workout Climbing Youth Void Net/Basketball Mens Shed Art Social/Performance EldersCafe Climbing Youth ENTRANCE NORTH Class Yoga Zumba Providers Void Class Compute Toy Lib. Kitchen Music
  36. 36. PUBLIC PRESENTATION: WHAKATANE
  37. 37. OCCUPANTS 1. Pou Whakaaro 2. Supporting Families 3. East Bay Time Bank 4. Tipu Rakau 5. Budget Advisory 6. Toy Library 7. Baywide Community Law 8. Relationship Services Aotearoa 9. Community Education programmes (20) 10. Mens’ Shed 11. Wera Aotearoa Charitable Trust Operators • Gymnasium • Café • Climbing Wall Previously interested Providers to be confirmed 1. Te Puna Ora o Mataatua 2. Whakatane Arts and Crafts Society ACTIVITIES • Community Education • Ultra-fast Internet studio • Café • Childcare • Rock-Climbing Wall • Toy Library • Youth Drop-In Facilities • Elder Drop-In Facilities • Church Services • Recording Studio • Cultural Activities • Meditation • Performance Space • Dance • Music • Poetry • Rap • Exercise and Gymnastics • Physiotherapy/Massage • Indoor Sports • Games Room • Art Facility • Woodworking/Crafts • Exhibitions
  38. 38. NEXT STAGES • Comparative Capital Costs Done • Due Diligence Almost Done • Choice of Location Done • Consent Timeframes Done • Economic Analysis Started • Engagement of Provider Partners Started • Business Plan • Establish a Governing Board Almost Done • Public Awareness Campaign • Development of Design • Funding Processes • Working Drawings and Specs • Consent Processes

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