1
1. To discover the difference between organized
and unorganized sports.
2. To examine how amateur sports help local
commun...
• Introduction to Sports
• Amateur Sports
• College Sports
• Professional Sports
3
4
• Have set teams
– teams are defined as groups of individuals
who play together to accomplish a goal, such
as winning a ga...
• Are loosely organized sports not regulated by a
governing body
• Often have undefined or unclear rules
• Examples includ...
• Amateur
• College
• Professional
7
8
• Include all sports leagues not
professional or collegiate
• Players do not receive money or
tuition for their effort
• I...
– baseball
– basketball
– golf
– gymnastics
– hockey
– ice skating
– football
– rodeo
– swimming
– skateboarding
– skiing/...
• Benefit the community in the following ways:
– make the population more physically active
– increase the bond between ci...
• The American Youth Soccer Organization is a
nationwide non-profit organization promoting
youth soccer. The AYSO fosters
...
• Also participate in a variety of recreational activities
• May join specific leagues or community-sponsored events
• Inc...
• Nearly 12.4 million people over the age of 65
engage in an organized sports activity at
least six times a year. Popular ...
• Is defined as the practice of
pricing, promoting and placing of a
company’s products
• In amateur sports is often done b...
16
• Are offered by colleges and universities
• Provide economic benefit to colleges and
universities
• Also provide benefits...
• Intramural sports
• Club sports
• School-sponsored athletics
18
• Are another example of an amateur sport
• Have rules setting them apart from being an
unorganized sport
• Athletes do no...
• Can be defined as “sports played within the walls of a
school’s jurisdiction”
• Are structured to allow non college athl...
• Example: University Intramural Basketball
Program
Leagues offered: Men, Women, Co-ed
League skill levels:
Competitive, I...
• Include the following:
– men – an all male league
– women – an all female league
– co-ed – a league which includes men a...
• Include the following:
– competitive – the league with the most
advanced players
– intermediate – the league comprised o...
• Include the following:
– Greek – teams are comprised of members
belonging to the same fraternity or sorority
– off-campu...
• Allows students of all ages and skill
levels to participate in athletics
• Promotes social networking and
fitness among ...
• Are sports officially recognized by an institution’s athletic
department, but are not covered by student fees
• Often re...
• Are officially recognized by the college or
university
• Remain funded through the school’s athletic
department
• Come w...
• Stands for National Collegiate Athletic
Association®
• Is the governing body of collegiate sports
• Governs competition ...
• Regulates the following for collegiate athletes and
collegiate programs:
– ethical conduct
– employment regulations
– re...
• Offers three divisions of competition
– division I
– division II
– division III
• in general, larger schools compete in ...
• Is split into two classifications
– bowl subdivision
• requires the school to have at least 16 athletic
teams
– champion...
• Requires the schools to have at least 10 athletic
teams to meet NCAA® regulations
• Athletes may receive financial aid f...
• Requires the school to have at least 10
athletic teams
• Athletes receive no financial aid for playing
sports
• Athletes...
• Stands for National Junior College Athletic
Association ®
• Is the national governing body for over 500
junior colleges ...
• Stands for the National Association of Intercollegiate
Athletics®
• Is the national governing body for approximately 350...
• College sports are divided into conferences
and divisions
• Conference and division titles vary for each
sport
• Most sp...
• Are groups of teams competing against one another in a
variety of sports
• Are very similar to leagues
• Offer member sc...
• Come in many different forms
– economic
– increase in student applications
– increase in school pride
38
• Include economic benefits provided by
collegiate sports
– For example, when Drake University
held the 2008 Track and Fie...
• May increase if a collegiate team is victorious
– shows many students want to be part of an
exciting atmosphere
– also s...
• Can be increased if a collegiate team is
victorious
• Can also swell pride in the surrounding
civic area
• May cause ind...
• In college sports is big business, worth
millions of dollars per year
• Is usually handled by a university’s athletic
de...
• Is defined as the paid use of a logo or name to be
used for merchandise
• Is regulated in collegiate athletics by the NC...
• Have been supported by the NCAA® since 1981
• Have increased due to Title IX Legislation
– Congress enacted Title IX in ...
• May have led to the removal of many men’s
sports and the addition of many women’s
sports
• For example a university may ...
46
• Are sports where the athletes are paid for their
performance
• Provide an economic benefit to the home city
• Foster civ...
• Are defined by the NCAA® as, “individuals who receive
any kind of payment, directly or indirectly, for athletic
particip...
• Divide franchises into conferences and divisions to
regulate game play and simplify scheduling
• Involve intensive manag...
• Can mean different things to different parts of a
professional sports organization
• Owners generally find success in ma...
• Are the venues in which sports are played
• Can be franchise-owned, sponsored or community
owned
• Have the ability to h...
• Are spending limits affecting how much a team can
spend on a certain player
• Give teams limits on total player spending...
• Are contracts existing between the owners of a sport’s
league and the player’s association
• Contain rules for player sa...
• Are unions joined by players
• Sign Collective Bargaining Agreements with
governing bodies of sports leagues
• Offer ser...
• Are stoppages of league play due to disagreements
between players unions and the governing bodies of
sports leagues
• Ar...
• Are also stoppages of league play due to disagreements
between players unions and the governing bodies of
sports leagues...
• Try to attract sports teams for their positive
economic impact
• Also try to attract sports teams to build civic
pride
•...
• Is done by giving the team a new stadium
– stadiums are the most expensive cost of owning a
team
– stadiums are often bu...
• Successfully is a full time job
– small parts of city government must be
allocated to lure a team
• May be accomplished ...
• For example, Portland Oregon has been campaigning to
get a Major League Baseball® Team. The Oregon Sports
Authority, Por...
• Usually requires the following:
– a vote of the existing franchises to admit the team
– a bid for the new franchise made...
• National Football League®
– the most recent expansion team
in the NFL® is the Houston
Texans which began play in 2002
• ...
• Entails a league moving an existing franchise
to a new city
• Is determined by league owners and
managers
• Is usually t...
• National Football League®
– the Houston Oilers moved to
Nashville, Tennessee and became the
Tennessee Titans
• Major Lea...
• Are substances such as steroids or steroid based
compound which are taken to increase performance
• Are a prominent issu...
• Is the wagering of money on a sporting event with an
uncertain outcome with the primary intent of winning
additional mon...
• Have increased in popularity and
attendance in the last ten years
• Include basketball, golf, tennis,
gymnastics, soccer...
• Mildred "Babe" Didrickson
Zaharias (golf)
• Ann Meyers (basketball)
• Julie Krone (horse racing)
• Manon Rheaume (hockey...
• Vary in geographic popularity
– American football is not very popular in Asia
• Also includes the following leagues whic...
• In professional sports is worth billions of dollars
• Includes sponsorships such as advertisements on a
baseball field’s...
71
Amateur Sports Collegiate Sports Professional Sports
Help the local
economy
Build civic pride
Athletes receive
educatio...
• www.logoserver.com
• www.northernsun.org
• www.jewell.edu
• Amateur Sports
http://research.givingmatters.com
• NCAA® Mem...
• Sacked admissions?
www.southbendtribune.com
• NCAA® March (Licensing) Madness
http://abcnews.go.com
• What Is NCAA® Foot...
• www.oursportscentral.com
• www.nba.com
• www.nba.com
• www.soccer.org
• http://naia.cstv.com
• www.indiana.edu
• www.dru...
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College amateur and prof sports student

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  • Eligibility regulations for intramural sports are developed to ensure team fairness and to help eliminate controversy. For instance, most campus intramurals are only available to students or faculty members who pay activity fees. Most intramural participants pay a small registration fee and play games once a week. While most intramural sports do have referees, they are usually available simply to supervise or help prevent injury.
  • A high quality intramural sports program encourages participation in voluntary and recreational sports activities for everyone. It therefore exemplifies the "sports for all" concept. While some intramural sports may seem competitive in nature, the main purpose of intramural is not athletics. Rather intramural programs are used to promote the social aspect of college life.
  • While the funding policies for club sports may vary from school to school, most club teams are responsible for conducting their own fundraisers and travel arrangements.
  • Examples:Student admissions rose 12% at Boston College University after Doug Flutie beat the University of Miami in a “Hail Mary” finish in 1984Admissions grew at the University of Northwestern when the perennial conference bottom feeder won the conference championship and went on to the Rose Bowl™ in 1995Admissions spiked at Marquette University when now NBA® superstar Dwayne Wade led Marquette to the Final Four™ in 2003Admissions increased at University of Missouri when the football team went to their first ever conference championship game in 2008
  • Example: The University of California Los Angeles, Berkley has a licensing agreement with Adidas® for $2.5 million per year. This means UCLA wears everything from Adidas shoes, to Adidas jerseys and sweatbands.
  • College amateur and prof sports student

    1. 1. 1
    2. 2. 1. To discover the difference between organized and unorganized sports. 2. To examine how amateur sports help local communities. 3. To show the difference between collegiate and professional sports. 4. To analyze various aspects of professional sports. 5. To discuss the ethical and legal aspects of sports. 2
    3. 3. • Introduction to Sports • Amateur Sports • College Sports • Professional Sports 3
    4. 4. 4
    5. 5. • Have set teams – teams are defined as groups of individuals who play together to accomplish a goal, such as winning a game • Play in organized leagues – leagues are defined as groups of teams who play the same sport by a certain set of rules • rules are a set of guidelines given by a governing body or higher power such as a league commissioner 5
    6. 6. • Are loosely organized sports not regulated by a governing body • Often have undefined or unclear rules • Examples include the following: – street hockey – pickup basketball – bicycle riding 6 From the Playbook: Soccer is the number one sport in the world by number of participants.
    7. 7. • Amateur • College • Professional 7
    8. 8. 8
    9. 9. • Include all sports leagues not professional or collegiate • Players do not receive money or tuition for their effort • Include high school sports • Encompass most organized sports leagues, such as a basketball league at the local YMCA® 9 From the Playbook: Nearly 100,000 students play high school basketball each year.
    10. 10. – baseball – basketball – golf – gymnastics – hockey – ice skating – football – rodeo – swimming – skateboarding – skiing/snowboarding – soccer – surfing – tennis – track and field – wrestling 10 • Can include sports such as the following: From the Playbook: Can you name any additional amateur sports?
    11. 11. • Benefit the community in the following ways: – make the population more physically active – increase the bond between citizens and business or government officials who help facilitate amateur sports – bring citizens together to support each other – can build community pride 11 From the Playbook: The Amateur Athletic Union (AAU) was created in 1988 in an effort to support amateur athletes who hoped to compete in the Olympic Games. Despite several changes and opposition to the organization, the AAU still sponsors the annual Junior Olympic Games.
    12. 12. • The American Youth Soccer Organization is a nationwide non-profit organization promoting youth soccer. The AYSO fosters teamwork, good sportsmanship and positive coaching for kids. Visit them online at www.soccer.org. 12
    13. 13. • Also participate in a variety of recreational activities • May join specific leagues or community-sponsored events • Include a specific segment or market for sports advertisers – examples could include: • playing in an indoor soccer league • participating in elderly couples swim class • joining a bowling or softball league • entering a golf tournament at a country club • competing in a city triathlon 13
    14. 14. • Nearly 12.4 million people over the age of 65 engage in an organized sports activity at least six times a year. Popular sports for individuals ages 65 and over include walking, fishing and swimming. 14
    15. 15. • Is defined as the practice of pricing, promoting and placing of a company’s products • In amateur sports is often done by local businesses • For example, a local bank or construction business might sponsor jerseys for a softball team 15
    16. 16. 16
    17. 17. • Are offered by colleges and universities • Provide economic benefit to colleges and universities • Also provide benefits to the areas surrounding the colleges and universities 17 From the Playbook: Approximately 3-5 percent of amateur athletes will have the ability to compete at the collegiate level.
    18. 18. • Intramural sports • Club sports • School-sponsored athletics 18
    19. 19. • Are another example of an amateur sport • Have rules setting them apart from being an unorganized sport • Athletes do not receive class credit for playing and therefore are not classified as a collegiate sport • Athletes are not paid, and therefore are not classified as professional 19 Athletes are defined as people who train for a specific sporting event requiring a high amount of physical fitness.
    20. 20. • Can be defined as “sports played within the walls of a school’s jurisdiction” • Are structured to allow non college athletes to participate in athletics • Are usually organized to allow maximum participation for all players • May be offered for a limited number of college sports and skill levels 20 From the Playbook: Would you allow a member of the college women's soccer team to play intramural soccer?
    21. 21. • Example: University Intramural Basketball Program Leagues offered: Men, Women, Co-ed League skill levels: Competitive, Intermediate, Recreational Divisions: Greek Division, Off-campus Division, Residence Hall 21
    22. 22. • Include the following: – men – an all male league – women – an all female league – co-ed – a league which includes men and women, usually possessing requirements concerning the ratio of men to women 22
    23. 23. • Include the following: – competitive – the league with the most advanced players – intermediate – the league comprised of moderately-skilled athletes – recreational – the league usually consisting of beginner athletes 23
    24. 24. • Include the following: – Greek – teams are comprised of members belonging to the same fraternity or sorority – off-campus – teams are comprised of members who do not live in a dormitory on campus – residence hall – teams are comprised of members from the same dormitory 24
    25. 25. • Allows students of all ages and skill levels to participate in athletics • Promotes social networking and fitness among students • Expands the fan base for popular college sports 25
    26. 26. • Are sports officially recognized by an institution’s athletic department, but are not covered by student fees • Often require official tryouts • Must follow the required policies and procedures of the school • May consist of team or individual sports • Are extremely competitive in nature • Level of skill is higher than intramurals but less than school-sponsored athletics 26
    27. 27. • Are officially recognized by the college or university • Remain funded through the school’s athletic department • Come with high levels of media fan attention • Are governed by the National Collegiate Athletic Association® (NCAA®), National Junior College Athletic Association® (NJCAA®), or the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics® (NAIA®) 27
    28. 28. • Stands for National Collegiate Athletic Association® • Is the governing body of collegiate sports • Governs competition and integrates college athletics with academics • Also aims to assist athletes in the pursuit of higher education 28
    29. 29. • Regulates the following for collegiate athletes and collegiate programs: – ethical conduct – employment regulations – recruitment standards – academic requirements – awards, scholarships and benefits – playing and practicing seasons – rules enforcement – division membership 29
    30. 30. • Offers three divisions of competition – division I – division II – division III • in general, larger schools compete in the upper (division I) division while smaller schools participate in division II and division III 30
    31. 31. • Is split into two classifications – bowl subdivision • requires the school to have at least 16 athletic teams – championship subdivision • requires the school to have at least 14 athletic teams – bowl subdivision athletes are generally of a higher caliber than those who compete at the championship subdivision level • Athletes may receive significant financial aid for playing sports 31
    32. 32. • Requires the schools to have at least 10 athletic teams to meet NCAA® regulations • Athletes may receive financial aid for playing sports but many also receive academic grants to help pay tuition • Athletes are generally of lower caliber than athletes who compete at the division I level 32
    33. 33. • Requires the school to have at least 10 athletic teams • Athletes receive no financial aid for playing sports • Athletes are generally of lower caliber than athletes who compete at the division I or division II level 33
    34. 34. • Stands for National Junior College Athletic Association ® • Is the national governing body for over 500 junior colleges in the United States • Is separated into 24 regions • Offers three divisions of athletic competition in a variety of sports 34
    35. 35. • Stands for the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics® • Is the national governing body for approximately 350 small-college sports programs in the United States • Includes 300 member colleges and universities • Is divided into 14 regions and offers 23 championships in 13 sports 35 From the Playbook: The NAIA® was the first athletic organization to include both black colleges and women in national championships.
    36. 36. • College sports are divided into conferences and divisions • Conference and division titles vary for each sport • Most sports participate in a structured playoff system to determine a national champion 36
    37. 37. • Are groups of teams competing against one another in a variety of sports • Are very similar to leagues • Offer member schools a chance to compete for a conference championship • Are generally grouped by region 37 From the Playbook: Baseball has some of the lowest attendance rates out of all college sports.
    38. 38. • Come in many different forms – economic – increase in student applications – increase in school pride 38
    39. 39. • Include economic benefits provided by collegiate sports – For example, when Drake University held the 2008 Track and Field National Championships, many participants and fans traveled from around the country to view the event. Drake University and the surrounding area of Des Moines, Iowa received a significant economic boost from people who booked hotel rooms, rented cars and ate and shopped in the surrounding area. 39
    40. 40. • May increase if a collegiate team is victorious – shows many students want to be part of an exciting atmosphere – also shows many students want to be part of a “winning tradition” 40
    41. 41. • Can be increased if a collegiate team is victorious • Can also swell pride in the surrounding civic area • May cause individuals to buy more goods with a collegiate team’s logo or name 41
    42. 42. • In college sports is big business, worth millions of dollars per year • Is usually handled by a university’s athletic department • Includes sponsorships such as advertisements around a stadium • Also includes licensing 42
    43. 43. • Is defined as the paid use of a logo or name to be used for merchandise • Is regulated in collegiate athletics by the NCAA® • Brings in funding for both the individual colleges and universities and the NCAA® • Generates royalties, or money made off of licensing – For example, say the University of Miami licenses their logo to Under Armour®. Under Armour® then sells Under Armour® shirts having the University of Miami logo on them. For every shirt Under Armour® sells, they must pay a percentage of what they make to the University of Miami. 43
    44. 44. • Have been supported by the NCAA® since 1981 • Have increased due to Title IX Legislation – Congress enacted Title IX in 1972 to prohibit discrimination in educational programs, including collegiate athletics – all federally-funded public schools are required to follow Title IX 44 From the Playbook: Since the enactment of Title IX, female collegiate athletic participation has risen 456%.
    45. 45. • May have led to the removal of many men’s sports and the addition of many women’s sports • For example a university may cut men’s baseball and create women’s rowing to promote equality – this has been very controversial in recent years 45
    46. 46. 46
    47. 47. • Are sports where the athletes are paid for their performance • Provide an economic benefit to the home city • Foster civic pride within a community • Make up one of the fastest growing industries in the United States • Employs over 20,000 individuals 47 From the Playbook: Less than 2 percent of collegiate athletes will have the ability to compete at the professional level.
    48. 48. • Are defined by the NCAA® as, “individuals who receive any kind of payment, directly or indirectly, for athletic participation except as permitted by the governing legislation of the association” • Are individuals who earn their living playing sports • Receive payment for playing sports as well as by advertising a company’s products through endorsements 48 From the Playbook: An endorsement is a public figure’s personal approval or support for a product or service. Tiger Woods is one of the highest paid athletes due to his endorsements.
    49. 49. • Divide franchises into conferences and divisions to regulate game play and simplify scheduling • Involve intensive management on all levels • Include the following leagues – National Football League® – National Basketball Association® – Major League Baseball ® – National Hockey League® – Major League Soccer® – Arena Football League® 49
    50. 50. • Can mean different things to different parts of a professional sports organization • Owners generally find success in making money • Managers or coaches measure success in winning • Players find success in winning and reaching certain statistical milestones paying them bonuses – for example, a soccer player may have incentives, or motivators, in his contract to score more goals • Front office personnel such as marketing or public relations might measure success based on fan attendance 50 From the Playbook: Franchises are specific teams within a league
    51. 51. • Are the venues in which sports are played • Can be franchise-owned, sponsored or community owned • Have the ability to house multiple events or functions • Create employment within the community • Attract additional businesses such as restaurants, hotels, etc. 51
    52. 52. • Are spending limits affecting how much a team can spend on a certain player • Give teams limits on total player spending • May also affect individual player spending based upon factors such as years in the league and position • Are mandated and regulated by the governing bodies of major sporting leagues • Affect the National Football League®, National Basketball Association® and National Hockey League® – does not affect Major League Baseball® – Major League Baseball® is referred to as an “uncapped” league 52
    53. 53. • Are contracts existing between the owners of a sport’s league and the player’s association • Contain rules for player salaries • Also contain requirements for salary caps • Free agency is the process by which players are assigned a team; when a player is a “free agent” they are free to negotiate with any team with whom they wish to sign • Defines the rules for free agency 53
    54. 54. • Are unions joined by players • Sign Collective Bargaining Agreements with governing bodies of sports leagues • Offer services such as salary negotiation and player grievances – a player grievance is a dispute a player has with the league • Strive for better player contracts with the league – try to get more money for the players • For example the Major League Baseball® Players Association® (MLBPA) is a union for MLB® players 54
    55. 55. • Are stoppages of league play due to disagreements between players unions and the governing bodies of sports leagues • Are defined by the governing bodies not agreeing to the players association demands – the governing bodies do not let the players “work” • For example, the NFL® lockout of 2011 and NBA® lockout of 2011 occurred when the players and owners could not agree on Collective Bargaining Agreements. Even the NFL® referees experienced a lockout in 2012 when they could not agree with NFL® owners on a Collective Bargaining Agreement. 55
    56. 56. • Are also stoppages of league play due to disagreements between players unions and the governing bodies of sports leagues • Are defined by the players association not agreeing to the governing bodies demands – the players refuse to work under the agreement • For example, Major League Baseball® underwent a strike in 1994, and cancelled the World Series™ due to continued disagreements between the MLBPA and MLB® for a new Collective Bargaining Agreement 56
    57. 57. • Try to attract sports teams for their positive economic impact • Also try to attract sports teams to build civic pride • View the sports teams as advertising for the city 57
    58. 58. • Is done by giving the team a new stadium – stadiums are the most expensive cost of owning a team – stadiums are often built by passing stadium taxes, which raise taxes for the local community • Is also done by giving the sports team tax breaks to lure them to a new location 58
    59. 59. • Successfully is a full time job – small parts of city government must be allocated to lure a team • May be accomplished through two ways: – league expansion: when the league adds an additional team – team relocation: when the league relocates an existing team to an new location 59
    60. 60. • For example, Portland Oregon has been campaigning to get a Major League Baseball® Team. The Oregon Sports Authority, Portland Baseball Group and Oregon Baseball Campaign have combined to form the Oregon Stadium Campaign, a coalition of fans and business who want to bring baseball to Oregon. Visit them online at: www.oregonstadiumcampaign.com 60
    61. 61. • Usually requires the following: – a vote of the existing franchises to admit the team – a bid for the new franchise made by potential owners and cities for the location – contract negotiations with owners and location – stadium construction or lease agreement – creation of logos, team name and team colors, etc. – recruitment of staff and players 61 From the Playbook: Teams which are added to leagues are referred to as expansion teams since they expanded the league.
    62. 62. • National Football League® – the most recent expansion team in the NFL® is the Houston Texans which began play in 2002 • Major League Baseball® – the Tampa Bay Devil Rays and Arizona Diamondbacks were added in 1998 • National Basketball Association® – Charlotte Bobcats were added in 2004 62
    63. 63. • Entails a league moving an existing franchise to a new city • Is determined by league owners and managers • Is usually targeted toward franchises with financial problems • Involves attracting a franchise to the prospective city through competition 63
    64. 64. • National Football League® – the Houston Oilers moved to Nashville, Tennessee and became the Tennessee Titans • Major League Baseball® – the Montreal Expos moved to Washington D.C. and became the Washington Nationals • National Basketball Association® – the New Orleans Jazz moved to Salt Lake City, Utah and became the Utah Jazz 64
    65. 65. • Are substances such as steroids or steroid based compound which are taken to increase performance • Are a prominent issue in all of sports • Have been taken by many professional athletes • Will be an especially large issue in future years as money and media coverage of professional sports increase 65 From the Playbook: Athletes who have been accused of using performance enhancing drugs are Barry Bonds, Jason Giambi, Gary Sheffield, Marion Jones, Justin Gatlin, Shawne Merriman and many others.
    66. 66. • Is the wagering of money on a sporting event with an uncertain outcome with the primary intent of winning additional money • Can involve athletes or referees “throwing” games • Creates scandals and distrust from fans when it is completed by athletes or referees 66 From the Playbook: Baseball player Pete Rose is banned from the Baseball Hall of Fame due to gambling. Pete Rose has the most career hits of any major league baseball player in history.
    67. 67. • Have increased in popularity and attendance in the last ten years • Include basketball, golf, tennis, gymnastics, soccer, ice skating, etc. • Have created an additional marketing outlet for sports manufacturers – female athletes are now craving custom-designed golf clubs, soccer cleats, racing bikes, sporting apparel, etc. 67 From the Playbook: Jackie Mitchell, a female baseball pitcher, struck out Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig in a 1931 exhibition game.
    68. 68. • Mildred "Babe" Didrickson Zaharias (golf) • Ann Meyers (basketball) • Julie Krone (horse racing) • Manon Rheaume (hockey) • Cheryl Miller (basketball) • Mary Lou Retton (gymnastics) • Venus and Serena Williams (tennis) • Sheryl Swoops (basketball) • Billy Jean King (tennis) • Jackie Joyner-Kersee (track) • Annika Sorenstam (golf) • Mia Hamm (Soccer) • Janet Guthrie (auto racing) • Danica Patrick (auto racing) 68
    69. 69. • Vary in geographic popularity – American football is not very popular in Asia • Also includes the following leagues which we have not discussed : – Formula One Racing® – Professional Golf Association® – Women’s National Basketball Association® – Ladies Professional Golf Association® – NASCAR® – Etc. 69
    70. 70. • In professional sports is worth billions of dollars • Includes sponsorships such as advertisements on a baseball field’s outfield wall • Also includes money paid for naming rights to a stadium, such as University of Phoenix Stadium, home of the NFL®’s Arizona Cardinals 70 From the Playbook: Think of the last time you saw a professional athlete endorsing a product on television. That is sports marketing in action. Do you remember the product, the athlete or both?
    71. 71. 71 Amateur Sports Collegiate Sports Professional Sports Help the local economy Build civic pride Athletes receive educational benefits Make money off of licensing Play in designated stadiums Athletes receive money Teams have players associations
    72. 72. • www.logoserver.com • www.northernsun.org • www.jewell.edu • Amateur Sports http://research.givingmatters.com • NCAA® Membership Requirements www.ncaa.org • NCAA® Overview www.ncaa.org • What’s the difference between Divisions I, II and III? www.ncaa.org • NCAA® Member Conference Definition www.ncaa.org 72
    73. 73. • Sacked admissions? www.southbendtribune.com • NCAA® March (Licensing) Madness http://abcnews.go.com • What Is NCAA® Football? www.ncaafootball.com • Sportslaw Jargon: Strike vs. Lockout www.sportslawnews.com • NCAA® Executive Committee Minutes www1.ncaa.org • www.msnbc.msn.com • www.arenafootball.com • www.ccsd.ca • www.seniorjournal.com 73
    74. 74. • www.oursportscentral.com • www.nba.com • www.nba.com • www.soccer.org • http://naia.cstv.com • www.indiana.edu • www.drugfreesport.com • www.womenssportsfoundation.org 74

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