#BrandVandals: Who are they and how bad can it get?

1,375 views

Published on

A brand is a connection between an organisation and its publics or audiences. It exists in the mind of the audience through the reputation it earns by what it says, and how it acts.

The Internet and two-way forms of media are helping brands engage with internal and external audiences in a two-way dialogue.

It is taking the business of public relations back to its roots.

The audience has started to answer back and that dialogue is seldom easy. You can see the evidence of those organisations getting it right, and wrong, scattered across the web.

Who are #BrandVandals and how bad can it get?

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,375
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
332
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
12
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

#BrandVandals: Who are they and how bad can it get?

  1. 1. Who are they and how bad can it get? 1 | 21.11.2013 Stephen Waddington
  2. 2. #BrandVandals A brand is a connection between an organisation and its publics or audiences. It exists in the mind of the audience through the reputation it earns by what it says, and how it acts. The Internet and two-way forms of media are helping brands engage with internal and external audiences in a two-way dialogue. It is taking the business of public relations back to its roots. But the audience has started to answer back and that dialogue is seldom easy. You can see the evidence of those organisations getting it right, and wrong, scattered across the web. 2 | 21.11.2013
  3. 3. #BrandVandals Brand Vandal An individual or group of people that calls an organisation to account with the likelihood of causing reputation damage. 3 | 21.11.2013
  4. 4. We’re all potential #BrandVandals Source: Banksy on Advertising, The Fox is Black 4 | 21.11.2013
  5. 5. People answer back 5 | 21.11.2013
  6. 6. Hashtag #fail Source: Media Sensational 6 | 21.11.2013
  7. 7. Be careful what you ask for Source: Mashable 7 | 21.11.2013
  8. 8. Twitter chat backfires: #AskBG 8 | 21.11.2013
  9. 9. J P Morgan sees trouble ahead Source: Guardian 9 | 21.11.2013
  10. 10. Hacked Conservative party ad 10 | 21.11.2013
  11. 11. Wikileaks: Cable leaks 11 | 21.11.2013
  12. 12. Crowdsourced BP rebrand Source: Greenpeace 12 | 21.11.2013
  13. 13. Tesco Tumblr Source: Haggerston Tesco Tumblr 13 | 21.11.2013
  14. 14. WH Smiths carpet Twitter feed 14 | 21.11.2013
  15. 15. Staff revolt: hmvXFactorFiring 15 | 21.11.2013
  16. 16. Staff go rogue: Asda chicken licker 16 | 21.11.2013
  17. 17. Corporate behaviour called out Source: PETA (via YouTube) 17 | 21.11.2013
  18. 18. Pissed-off passenger 2.0 Source: Disgruntled Passenger 2.0, SimpliFlying 18 | 21.11.2013
  19. 19. Bodyform responds Source: Disgruntled Passenger 2.0, SimpliFlying 19 | 21.11.2013
  20. 20. Fake TripAdvisor restaurant Source: TripAdvisor removes fake restaurant, BBC News 20 | 21.11.2013
  21. 21. Dealing with #BrandVandals Assess publics & risk 21 | 21.11.2013 Plan and prepare team Listen & monitor Test plans Build advocates Engage with publics Address attacks head-on Evaluate and modify plans
  22. 22. Praise for #BrandVandals “If you have any interest whatsoever in brand reputation, and the vandals who threaten it, beg, borrow or steal this book. It should be your public relations bible.” Francis Ingham Director General, PRCA and Executive Director, ICCO “If you work in marketing, public relations or as an executive, this book is required reading.” Andrew Grill Partner, IBM Interactive at IBM “There is a Tahrir Square moment waiting to happen for a business or a brand. #BrandVandals grapples with these new truths and tries to make sense of it all... suggesting what might in fact be done.” Robert Phillips, Cass Business School 22 | 21.11.2013

×