Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Zero Policy = maximize profits; Clients (Refineries and petrochemical Facilities) will maximize profits if they develop a zero policy.

1,162 views

Published on

Clients (Refineries and petrochemical Facilities) will maximize profits if they develop a zero policy.
Zero-safety incidents
Zero- power failures with fastest power recovery
Zero- flares and process leaks
Zero- process downtime

Published in: Business
  • Be the first to comment

Zero Policy = maximize profits; Clients (Refineries and petrochemical Facilities) will maximize profits if they develop a zero policy.

  1. 1. Petro‐Chemical and Refinery  Master Electrical Plans and What a  Good Electrical System Looks Like Speaker: Vincent W. Wedelich, *PE, MBA,  Project Manager Power Distribution & Controls, Burns  & McDonnell Engineering Co, Inc. *Registered PE in Texas. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 1
  2. 2. Your company should have a  Zero Policy. • “zero” safety incidents • “zero” power failures; with “fastest” power  recovery • “zero” flares and process leaks • “zero” process downtime IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 2
  3. 3. Get everybody on board  to save bottom line  • Petro‐Chemical facility owners and refiners are advised to set a goal  of “zero” power failure and “fastest” power recovery and share the  goal with all the employees, including people working outside the  plant.  • When a refinery/petro‐chemical facility shuts down, business profit  is gone, thereby affecting everybody in the company, from the CEO  to the maintenance worker. • Any employees that offer key contribution in terms of ideas and  innovations to increased reliability and availability of a power  system should be offered financial incentive for avoiding power  failures.  • The Power of Habit!  By: Charles Duhigg Read it…. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 3
  4. 4. Reference Data • Long term optimization of asset replacement in energy  infrastructures; Ype C. Wijnia, Martijn S. Kom, Saskia Y. de Jager,  Paulien M. Herder 2006 • Refinery power failures: causes, costs and solutions;  Patrick J  Christensen, William H Graf and Thomas W Yeung Hydrocarbon  Publishing Company 2013 • Integrating Advanced Relays On Medium Voltage Switchgear Safety  Instrumented Systems (P66 and BMcD) IEEE PCIC 2013. • OSHA 1910.119 Process safety management of highly hazardous  chemicals • Arc Flash Mitigation in a Chemical and Refining Facility Using IEC  61850 (CPChem/BMcD IEEE PCIC 2012) • Many, many papers and studies published by IEEE. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 4
  5. 5. Abstract: • The material used in this presentation was readily available  from the internet and IEEE presentations.  This  presentation is for educational, safety, and process  improvement purposes only. • Applicable to Refineries and Petrochemical facilities  • Review of what an Electrical System Master Plan Study is:  – to identify system improvements related to reliability, – safety and maintainability for projected load expansion at the  refinery/petro‐chemical facility within the next 5 to 20 years.  – This master plan and the ideas presented were geared towards  creating a good foundation for the future of the electrical  system primarily through upgrade and replacement projects.  – Illustrate what a good electrical system looks like. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 5
  6. 6. Bio • Presenter: IEEE Houston Past Chair  • Mr. Wedelich is an Associate level project  manager and electrical engineer in  the Houston T&D Power Distribution and  Controls Department at Burns & McDonnell.  • His responsibilities include Power System  Design and Project Management for the  Industrial and refinery/petro‐chemical facility  Markets.  IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 6
  7. 7. Read the OSHA report on: THE 100 LARGEST LOSSES • 1972–2011 • Large  Property  Damage  Losses In The  Hydrocarbon  Industry IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 7
  8. 8. What do (Refinery, Petrochemical, Gas  Processing, & Terminals and  Distribution) have in common? • EarthQuakes • Fires • Explosions • Hurricanes (flooding) • Vapor Cloud Explosions • Corrosion (pipe racks!!!) failing. • Mechanical Damage IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 8
  9. 9. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 9
  10. 10. Explosion • Five people were killed and two seriously injured  following an explosion at a plastics plant producing 200  million barrels per year of specialty grade PVC. The  highway was shut and local residents evacuated. The  explosion occurred in a reactor where vinyl chloride  and vinyl acetate were being mixed. Up to 75% of the  plant was destroyed in the explosion. The explosion  was felt 4 miles away. • Solution: Implement Safety Integrity Systems  IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 10
  11. 11. Explosion • A release of hexane created a vapor cloud which  ignited on an electric motor causing an  explosion. This resulted in damage to the unit  and some 20 injuries. The plant was eventually  replaced. • Solutions: Implement Safety Integrity Systems  and address Area Classification Issues IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 11
  12. 12. Explosion/Fire • An accident occurred at one of the methylcellulose  manufacturing facilities located at this site. At 16:26 an  explosion occurred and was followed by a fire, which was  extinguished at 23:11 the same day. • Seventeen people who were working at the site were  injured in this accident; three critically, five seriously and  nine with minor injuries. There was one minor injury off  site. Static electricity induced the ignition of  methylcellulose powders, resulting in a powder dust  explosion. All methylcellulose operations were suspended  for two months before sequentially restarting. • Solutions: Resolve the Area Classification Issues IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 12
  13. 13. Hurricane (Flooding) • This petrochemical facility sustained damage  during Hurricane Ike. Storm surge, flooding and  high winds caused significant damage at the  site. Force majeure was declared and the most  heavily damaged portion of the plant remained  off line for 152 days. • Solutions: Coastal sites: The flood maps need to  be updated and electrical equipment needs to  be raised into elevated Power Control Room’s.   Have an alternate power source. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 13
  14. 14. Explosion • A massive explosion occurred in an ammonium nitrate  storage warehouse of a fertilizer plant just outside the  southern French city of Toulouse. The warehouse  contained approximately 300 tons of off‐specification  ammonium nitrate crystals. The explosion had the  strength of a 3.2 magnitude (Richter Scale) earthquake,  left most of the plant in ruins and caused damage to  surrounding areas. Thirty people were killed in the  blast and approximately 3,000 people were injured.  • Solutions: Address the (Area Classification Issues) IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 14
  15. 15. Explosion • An explosion and fire occurred in an olefins unit at this  petrochemical plant. The incident originated at the cracked gas  compressor in the olefins unit and was caused by a failed air  assisted check valve on a five inch diameter, 500 psi discharge line  from the compressor.  • Upon closure of the check valve, one of the pins holding the two‐ piece check valve stem broke and allowed it to open in the  opposite direction. This led to a gas leak, ignition, explosion and  ensuing fire at the partially enclosed compressor building. The  explosion damaged a line to the quench tower, which fed the fire.  The fire was allowed to burn itself out. • About 30 workers were treated for minor injuries.  • Solutions: Address the (Safety Integrity Systems,  and the Area  Classification Issues) IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 15
  16. 16. Fire/Explosion • A vent connection failed on a compressor suction  line, releasing gas which led to a violent explosion  with widespread damage. This was believed to be  a fatigue failure due to vibration.  • Fatigue failures due to vibration!!  Vibrations  and corrosion is setting the industry up for  major issues. • In electricity networks almost all parts are  vibrating at 100 Hz, resulting in metal fatigue. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 16
  17. 17. Aging Infrastructure • The oldest assets in operation are about 60 years old, the  average age of the asset base is about 30 years.  • However, assets do not have perpetual lives, as normal  wear and tear takes it toll. • In the energy distribution systems, the assets are relatively  old.  • Distribution companies expect a large number of assets to  fail because they reach their end of life in 1 to 21 years  from now (current year 2015). IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 17
  18. 18. Aging Infrastructure • Vibration and corrosion influences build up over time, and  nobody knows for certain how fast deterioration will take  place.  • The best estimate for the lifespan is between 40 and 80  years, depending on the type of asset.  • This means we can expect at least part of the asset base to  reach end‐of‐life within 1 to 11 years. • End‐of‐life is defined as a non‐repairable failure of the  asset. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 18
  19. 19. Aging Infrastructure • The failing assets will have to be replaced,  which would potentially double the total  workload in this 20 year period. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 19
  20. 20. Aging Personnel In parallel, to aging equipment , engineering staff  retires after about 40 years in service.  As most of them were employed during the seventies, we can expect a large part of them to  retire in the year 2016.  About half of the work  force will retire by year 2013). IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 20
  21. 21. One in Five • One in five young people will need to become an  engineer if we have any chance of addressing  severe skills shortages and rebalancing the  economy towards advanced manufacturing, new  research has warned. • There is no getting away from the fact that  women are substantially under‐represented in  manufacturing at a time when industry needs to  be tapping into every potential talent pool to  access the skills it needs. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 21
  22. 22. Demand is high and is getting higher  for qualified engineers • With the number of baby boomers retiring in 2017 and in 2022 . . . the big  fear is that . . . there are not enough individuals coming into the workforce  to replace everybody, especially in the engineering fields.  • The dilemma of a shortage of skilled engineers has become a prime topic  of discussion across the country.  • The present‐day labor market for most United States‐born engineering  graduates remains relatively competitive in a time of high unemployment  after large manufacturers and firms have consolidated operations during  the recession.  • Many engineers also have to compete with highly qualified candidates in  China and India.  • But recruiters indicate that demand for engineers and a more technically  inclined workforce in the U.S. is only expected to grow.  IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 22
  23. 23. Refinery/petro‐chemical facility  Shutdowns  from 2009 to 2012 From 2009 to 2012, there were over 1700 refinery shutdowns, or 1.2 shutdowns per day.  IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015 Rev. 0 For  Educational, Safety, and Process Improvement Purposes Only 23
  24. 24. Causes of power  disruptions from  2009 to 2012 Other causes, mostly fires that occurred at the refinery/petro‐chemical facility.   Unfortunately, over 60% of the causes of electrical disruptions are not specified. Most of  the unspecified power failures were listed as “a power failure occurred at the refinery  and caused flaring” or similar statements.  IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 24
  25. 25. Flooding during Hurricanes • Although high wind and debris are the most  commonly cited causes of hurricane damage, for  Gulf Coast refineries in the US, where hurricanes  hit most often and hardest, the greatest  hurricane damage is the result of flooding.  • It is not uncommon for a water line to be seen in  refineries, the electrical equipment needs to be  raised out of the water flood line. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 25
  26. 26. Structural Integrity • It is important to understand that there is a difference between reliably  supporting piping & process equipment versus being able to “stand in  place” with piping and process equipment. • In many existing facilities,  – previous expansions,  – modifications,  – the age of the structures  – as well as unknown conditions such as materials,  – have drastically reduced the overall reliability of the support structures. • While these structures remain upright, that does not mean they have the  same reliability they once did in the original state. • In many instances, the “in‐place” condition of many of the support  structures are  – already well below current minimum standards of reliability,  – not to mention “good practice” standards. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 26
  27. 27. New steel is added to aging pipe racks,  this can occur 3 and 4 times, the  engineers designing these pipe racks  could not have anticipated this. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 27
  28. 28. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 28
  29. 29. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 29
  30. 30. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 30
  31. 31. Key Issues LPG Fire • Lack of Freeze Protection Of Dead‐legs: failure likely  resulted from water trapped in the propane mix control  station dead‐leg freezing due to low ambient temperatures.  • Lack of an Emergency Isolation Of Equipment  • Lack of Fireproofing Of Support Steel  • Lack of Fire Protection For High Pressure LPG Service  • Chlorine Release: change it to sodium hypochlorite system. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 31
  32. 32. Multiple unit shutdowns  • Since most refinery/petro‐chemical facility units are  integrated and sometimes share the same power supply,  power failures could lead to the shutdown of these  integrated units and the production loss of many refined  products, thereby magnifying potential damages.  • A facility in Alaska, experienced a power outage. The  hydrocracker and another unit were shutdown.  • In a Texas, plant experienced an external power failure that  knocked its plant and other refineries in the area offline.  IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 32
  33. 33. Safety and Reliability Approval • Most companies care about three values: financials,  reliability and safety. • For manageable optimization purposes, a single‐objective is  pursued.  • The common way forward is to express safety and reliability  in monetary values. • What is the cost to the bottom line if it is not corrected? • There is no acceptable monetary value that can be place on  safety and saving lives. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 33
  34. 34. Production loss and profit penalties • When a power failure occurs, a refinery/petro‐chemical  facility unit or units, or an entire facility must be shut  down and production is lost.  • A refiner could post a loss instead of profit in a quarter,  and adverse financial impacts are further magnified  when refining margins are poor.  • For a rough estimate, a US Gulf Coast refinery/petro‐ chemical facility with an average‐ sized FCC unit of 80K  b/d will lose $68K/hour for a downed unit. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 34
  35. 35. Case study • A facility (refinery/petro‐chemical facility up north), was down from 28 October to  20 November 2012 due to SuperStorm Sandy.  • According to the company, the expenses related to the storm were $56 million  before tax.  • This loss did not include missed production for over three weeks. • Based on the refinery’s nameplate gasoline production capacity of 145 000 b/d  and distillate production capacity of 115,000 b/d,  • a utilization rate of 85% and average spot market prices of gasoline of $2.812/gal  and $3.084/gal for distillates in New York Harbor during the shutdown period,  estimated revenue loss was over $650 million.  • Net profit loss ranged from $5.3 million for cash margins of $1/bbl to $26.5 million  for cash margins of $5/bbl.  • US refineries outside the East Coast should expect a bigger financial impact, since  East Coast refiners are known to have much lower refining margins than their  peers in other parts of the country.  IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 35
  36. 36. Potential legal liabilities  • Aside from missed production, outages prompt unnecessary flaring of  hydrocarbons to avoid unsafe conditions.  • Over the past 10 years, the US EPA has entered into settlements with 28  different refineries that are aimed at restricting emissions by the oil  industry.  • The EPA has acquired consent decrees from 105 US refineries in 32 states  and territories since December 2000.  • All of the settlements have involved at least one of four primary pollution  types: NOx, SOx, benzene and volatile organic compounds (VOCs).  • Furthermore, all of the violations involved one or more four key  refinery/petro‐chemical facility components: the FCC unit, SRU, flares and  heaters/ boilers.  • Excessive flaring can lead to environmental concerns and incur fines  imposed by environmental agencies.  IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 36
  37. 37. Potential legal liabilities • A facility in Texas paid over $87 million in fines  issued by OSHA along with undisclosed  amounts in civil suits related to an explosion  and subsequent fire at its Texas City, Texas,  refinery/petro‐chemical facility that resulted  in 15 worker deaths and over 170 injuries.  IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 37
  38. 38. A Reliable Electrical Supply • Electricity is the lifeblood of the  refinery/petro‐chemical facility operation.  • Optimal design and excellent construction  mean nothing if the plant cannot receive a  consistent and reliable power supply.  IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 38
  39. 39. Managing Electrical Outages IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 39
  40. 40. In handling risk management • A refinery/petro‐chemical facility must install the most  reliable equipment available in the market that can  withstand disruptions caused by  – weather,  – power surges,  – blackouts,  – and any other outside elements.  • Since no equipment is perfect, reliability engineers and  operators still need to prepare for worst‐case scenarios  as well as the most frequently occurring possibilities.  IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 40
  41. 41. Crisis Management • When a problem does arise, the second part  of the strategy — crisis management — comes  into play.  • This involves the recovery technologies that  allow for safe shutdown and continued  operation, and the restart methods that will  not lead to the same problem that caused the  previous failure.  IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 41
  42. 42. Prevention and protection • One of the most important preventative  measures a refinery/petro‐chemical facility  can take is to have an efficient maintenance  program.  • Studies show that the failure rate of electrical  equipment is three times higher for  components that are not part of a scheduled  preventative maintenance program.  IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 42
  43. 43. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 43
  44. 44. Reliability of systems Everyone in this room, is smart, and can without a doubt, show that the reliability is not as bad as  it looks, (using monte‐carlo type tools).  In affect they can kill key improvements by using  statistics and math.  This is short term thinking.   A safer more reliable, facility will return higher profits.   Reward your employees who bring you safety ideas, and optimization ideas.   IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 44
  45. 45. Radial Feed System • A Radial Feed System supplies electrical power via a single lineup of  components from a supply bus, such as the utility supply, to the final  utilization equipment.  • In simplified terms, one feeder supplies one or more distribution  transformers which in turn supplies one or more motor control centers or  distribution panels.  • These motor control centers and distribution panels then supply individual  motor or other branch circuit loads. There is no duplication of equipment. • Failure of any single component will cause an outage to all loads downstream of the failure point and loss of production.  • In addition the electrical equipment must be shut down to perform  routine maintenance.  • System investment is the lowest of the circuit arrangements, operation is  simple, and reliability is as good as the quality and maintenance of the  components. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 45
  46. 46. Dual Feed System • Various Dual Feed Systems are available and provide multiple paths to supply all or  parts of the distribution system.  • A primary selective system provides dual feeds on the primary or upstream side of  a transformer.  • A secondary selective system provides dual feeds on the lower voltage side of a  pair of transformers but not all the utilization equipment is redundant.  • Some power systems incorporate both primary and secondary selective options.  • Dual Feed Systems provide multiple ways to supply most components except for  the final utilization equipment – individual starters to motors for instance.  • On properly designed Dual Feed systems, most maintenance can be performed  following proper switching of loads without affecting refinery/petro‐chemical  facility operations. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 46
  47. 47. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 47
  48. 48. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 48
  49. 49. Dual Feed System • However, pumps and compressors that are not redundant (un‐ spared) will require operations interruptions for maintenance.  • On Dual Feed systems with normally‐closed ties or automatic  transfer schemes, a power outage or significant loss of production  should be minimized for a single feeder or transformer failure.  • Operation of the system is more complicated and initial installation  cost is higher than for a Radial Feed System.  • The main advantage of a Dual Feed system is that because of the  multiple paths to provide electrical power, the electrical system has  a high degree of reliability and availability which results in an overall  lower LPO exposure than for a Radial System.  • This is important for critical process or utility operations. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 49
  50. 50. Loop‐Feed or Ring‐Bus System • A Loop‐Feed arrangement is sometimes used on  primary distribution systems to feed multiple loads  from different sources.  • Generally, it is a system that can be manually‐ configured to isolate portions of the loop for  maintenance or repair.  • A ring‐bus system includes multiple sources and loads  in a normally‐closed loop system with protective  relaying designed to automatically isolate faulted  sections. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 50
  51. 51. Combinations of Radial, Dual Feed,  and Looped Systems • Combinations of the above systems are present in most facilities.  • The incoming Utility power and perhaps the primary distribution system in  the plant are usually some form of Dual Feed, Looped, or Ring‐Bus system  for reliability and maintainability.  • Critical utility or common facilities that can never be shutdown, such as  boiler plants, effluent systems, sulfur removal plants, plant air compressor  systems, or the like, almost always require 2 or more sources of power  (usually Dual Feed system) with careful consideration of load arrangement  for maintainability.  • The electrical availability, operational reliability and maintenance  requirements are balanced against installed capital costs.  • It should be noted that installation of a radial fed system connected to a  secondary selective system does cause problems trying to schedule  maintenance for the secondary selective bus. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 51
  52. 52. Formulating strategies  to mitigate power  failures  • Every processing unit within an oil refinery/petro‐ chemical facility was meticulously designed and  planned on the assumption that it would receive a  constant power supply.  • With that in mind, it is necessary to consider the steps  that could be taken to ensure 24/7 production from  every process.  • Risk management and crisis management must be  practiced to maximize productivity of the plant.  IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 52
  53. 53. Impacts of refinery/petro‐chemical  facility power failures IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 53
  54. 54. Power independence  • Onsite power generation via combined heat and  power (CHP) units and microgrids are worth  consideration.  • The latest CHP and microgrid technologies can be  incorporated into the design of a new  refinery/petro‐chemical facility power grid that  can be combined with other renewable energy  generation units as a way to improve power  supply security and reduce plant carbon  footprint.  IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 54
  55. 55. Get everybody on board  to save bottom line  • Petro‐Chemical facility owners and refiners are advised to set a goal  of “zero” power failure and “fastest” power recovery and share the  goal with all the employees, including people working outside the  plant.  • When a refinery/petro‐chemical facility shuts down, business profit  is gone, thereby affecting everybody in the company, from the CEO  to the maintenance worker. • Any employees that offer key contribution in terms of ideas and  innovations to increased reliability and availability of a power  system should be offered financial incentive for avoiding power  failures.  • The Power of Habit!  By: Charles Duhigg Read it…. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 55
  56. 56. Major Equipment In Electrical Systems • Generators • Motors  • Power & control cables  • Transformers  • UPS • Battery chargers  • Battery banks  • Switch gear & control gear  • Panels  • Lighting  IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 56
  57. 57. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 57
  58. 58. Transformers • Almost every malfunction is a result of the failure of  the device’s insulation system.  • The insulation is what keeps the transformer in  electrical balance and, when the insulation ceases to  function, the entire transformer is susceptible to  immediate failure.  • Faults, heat and mechanical damage will lead to  insulation failure, but the electrical engineer can avoid  these issues by selecting a unit capable of withstanding  expected operating and fault conditions.  IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 58
  59. 59. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 59
  60. 60. Cables  • A refinery/petro‐chemical facility will use miles of cable for power  distribution, motor operation and process control.  • Its ability to transport signals and current will impact the entire  refinery/petro‐chemical facility’s ability to operate.  • Protection of all the cables is vital for any part of a process.  • Cables will suffer from degradation to their insulation through heat  and contamination.  • Parts of a cable that heat up from excessive current or external  factors will be vulnerable to water trees and short circuits.  • Cables surrounded by polymer insulation are especially vulnerable  to the damage caused by water trees.  IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 60
  61. 61. Major Equipment In Electrical Systems Cables: An electrical cable comprises two or more  wires running side by side and bonded, twisted, or  braided together to form a single assembly, the  ends of which can be connected to two devices,  enabling the transfer of electrical signals from one  device to the other. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 61
  62. 62. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 62
  63. 63. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 63
  64. 64. Switchgear • Switchgear is a combination of electrical  enclosures, buses, protective relays, circuit  breakers, fuses, controls and indicating devices  that are used to distribute power to and protect  other electric equipment.  • Receiving power from generators or transmission  cables, they will distribute their power to other  switchgear (or switchboards) and motor control  centers.  IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 64
  65. 65. Switchgear • Arcing is a major threat to switchgear safety and  reliability.  • Major arc flashes and blasts will ruin the switchgear  and nearby equipment, and endanger nearby workers. • An arcing event can cost a refinery/petro‐chemical  facility as much as $15 million per incident. • Plant engineers should select arc‐resistant models that  utilize quick sensing and switching to de‐energize arcs.  IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 65
  66. 66. Motor control center  • A motor control center (MCC) is used to group a  number of combinations of motor controllers together  with a common power bus.  • A MCC gives operators easy and safe control over a  number of different motors throughout the facility.  • Motor controllers serve several key functions: starting  or stopping the motor it controls, interrupting the  current of the motor, and providing overcurrent  protection.  IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 66
  67. 67. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 67
  68. 68. Major Equipment In Electrical Systems Panels: is a component of an electricity supply  system which divides an electrical power feed  into subsidiary circuits, while providing a  protective fuse or circuit breaker for each circuit  in a common enclosure. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 68
  69. 69. MAJOR EQUIPMENT IN ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS Switchgear & control gear : switchgear is the  combination of electrical disconnect switches, fuses  or circuit breakers used to control, protect and  isolate electrical equipment. Switchgear is used  both to de‐energize equipment to allow work to be  done and to clear faults downstream IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 69
  70. 70. Motors  • As far as consumption of electric energy goes,  nothing in a refinery/petro‐chemical facility  comes close to the amount of power provided  to motor‐driven devices.  • Motor‐driven equipment will typically account  for 70% of energy consumption in refineries,  so special attention must be paid to their  proper selection and operation.  IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 70
  71. 71. Major Equipment In Electrical Systems Motor: a motor, is a machine designed to  convert one form of energy into mechanical  energy IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 71
  72. 72. Protective relays • Relays are essential to any electrical system. • Pick one kind of relay, so that you can develop a reliable, intelligent  data collection system.    • Do not allow any capital project team to implement multiple relay  manufactures.  It complicates the entire system. • They are used in all parts of the system, from the generators and  substation to the transmission lines and load.  • Protective relays detect abnormal system conditions and direct the  circuit breakers to operate in the proper manner, to correct any  abnormality.  IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 72
  73. 73. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 73
  74. 74. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 74
  75. 75. Grounding • A properly grounded (earthed) system will  protect equipment and personnel from exposure  to fault currents.  • Well‐placed and ‐designed grounding will divert  any faults to earth or a grounded bus.  • It is utilized throughout an electric system for  equipment such as transformers and motors, and  on conductive structures like storage tanks and  pipes.  IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 75
  76. 76. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 76
  77. 77. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 77
  78. 78. Inadequate Lightning Protection • In Port Arthur, Texas, facility experienced lightning that led to a power  outage and also stated a fire. The lightning caused a crude unit, two  hydrotreaters and a delayed coker to shut down.  • Unlike the above experience, in July 2009, a refinery/petro‐chemical  facility in Pasadena, Texas, experienced a lightning strike that disabled all  power to the Tank farm, which resulted in loss of feed to the refinery’s  crude unit. The feed was restored with a backup generator, and the  refinery was able to run using backup power and keep operations online  despite the loss of power to the tank farm.  • A facility in Los Angeles CA experienced a power surge caused by lightning,  which caused the hydrocracking unit to trip. Emissions of sulphur dioxide  and hydrogen sulphide were released during the flaring caused by the  shutdown.  IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 78
  79. 79. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 79
  80. 80. Lightning Protection • Fixed Angle Method • Rolling Sphere Method • Proper grounding IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 80
  81. 81. Introduction to Lightning Protection i. Notes continued:   » Aluminum materials shall not be used where they come  in to direct contact with earth.  A bimetallic connector  shall be installed not less than 10” above earth level. » Aluminum conductors shall not be attached to a surface  coated with alkaline base paint, embedded in concrete  or masonry, or installed in a location subject to  excessive moisture. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 81
  82. 82. Introduction to Lightning Protection IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 82
  83. 83. Introduction to Lightning Protection – Air Terminal height  • The tip of an air terminal shall not be less then 10  inches above the object or area it is to protect. – Zone of protection • To determine the zone of protection, the geometry of  the structure shall be considered. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 83
  84. 84. Introduction to Lightning Protection IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 84
  85. 85. Introduction to Lightning Protection IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 85
  86. 86. Introduction to Lightning Protection – Location of devices • There are set distances that an air terminal can be  installed apart from each other on a roof peak or at  the edge of the roof that is pitched or flat. – Within 2’ of the edge of the roof – 20‐25 ft. maximum spacing along the ridge. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 86
  87. 87. Recovery and restart • Preventative and protective measures will make  great strides towards decreasing downtime  arising from power failures.  • But if a failure does occur, it is necessary to  minimize loss in production and resume normal  operation as quickly as possible.  • Even if the units are running at reduced rates,  flaring can be reduced and production will not  completely halt.  IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 87
  88. 88. Backup generators  • When the power goes down, all the units have  to stop.  • On‐site generators give operators the ability to  continue running units when the primary  power goes down. • These units are not usually used as the  primary power due to fuel costs.  IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 88
  89. 89. Major Equipment In Electrical Systems Generator: a generator is a device that converts mechanical  energy to electrical energy for use in an external circuit.  The source of mechanical energy may vary widely from a hand  crank to an internal combustion engine. Generators provide  nearly all of the power for electric power grids. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 89
  90. 90. Uninterruptible power supply  • UPS is a device that acts as a backup power source.  • It is designed to detect power dips and power failures, and initiate a  battery backup power once a problem is detected. • A UPS should only be used in an environment that it is rated for.  • UPS system loads consist of  – digital control systems,  – programmable logic controllers,  – critical process instruments,  – fire and gas alarm panels,  – safety shutdown systems,  – process equipment control panels (boiler controls, compressor  controls, and so on)  – and other critical electrical loads. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 90
  91. 91. Major Equipment In Electrical Systems UPS: An uninterruptible power supply, also  uninterruptible power source, UPS, is an  electrical apparatus that provides emergency  power to a load when the input power source,  typically mains power, fails UPS INPUT OUTPUT Spikes Interruption Harmonics Under Voltage Continuous Clean Filtered Critical Loads IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 91
  92. 92. 3‐ UPS COMPONENTS 1. Normal Electric Source 2. Rectifier (Charger) 3. Battery. 4. Inverter. 5. Static Transfer Switch (STS). 6. Maintenance Bypass Switch (MBS). 7. Bypass Electric Source. STS Critical Load Bypass Source Normal Source IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 92
  93. 93. 4‐ How UPS Works? STS Critical Load Bypass Source Normal Source Normal Mode Auto Bypass ManualBypass Power Outage (Battery Mode) FAILURE IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 93
  94. 94. Major Equipment In Electrical Systems Battery banks: a container consisting of one or  more cells, in which chemical energy is  converted into electricity and used as a source  of power IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 94
  95. 95. Major Equipment In Electrical Systems Battery charger : A battery charger or recharger  is a device used to put energy into a secondary  cell or rechargeable battery by converting  current from AC to DC. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 95
  96. 96. What we have found during site visits • Pipe racks are severely overloaded.  When performing laser scans it can be  seen that the pipe racks are in fatigue, bending beyond the calculated  values. • Corrosion is causing pipes and pipe racks to fail. • Area classification issues, there are to many to count. – Hydrogen pipe/Control Valve in close proximity to a new PCR. – Conduit Seals not installed or installed incorrectly. – Arcing and sparking devices in areas that need explosion proof devices. • New equipment added that now creates an area classification issue. • SIS and SIF systems are not in place. • Aging personnel, leaving behind young untrained personnel.  IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 96
  97. 97. What we have found during site visits • Mis‐coordination of circuit breakers and fuses. • Undersized equipment (voltage or current). – Cannot withstand the short circuit current – Cannot withstand the continuous current. – I have heard CEO’s say: we don’t have this problem in our  facility do we?  (radial feeds to critical process units?  Can’t  be).  It is our jobs to inform our supervisors, they trust the  line managers, the maintenance crews, etc.. To inform  them of safety and reliability issues. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 97
  98. 98. An electrical master plan addresses • The reliability and safety of the existing electrical  system. • A report should be created to mitigate  (short/long term) plan to improve the reliability  and the safety of the electrical system supported  by justification. • Electrical cable and equipment needs to be  reviewed to see if the support structures are in  good shape. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 98
  99. 99. A Master Plan should include: • Recommendations of applying best practices and  equipment assessment. • Develop an accurate system model (ETAP, SKM, Easy  Power etc..) data collecting from the site visit to figure  out some of the reliability or safety issues such as: – Substation configuration (radial or redundant)  – Under rated equipment – Overload equipment – Voltage Dip  – Single Point of Failure – Short Circuit capability – Replacing of oil switches and protection relays – Future substation or equipment capabilityIEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 99
  100. 100. Long Range Plan Theories • Long Range Plan Theories  – Equipment Consolidation – Equipment Modernization – Equipment Maintainability • Long term goal, add substations as new load  dictates – Existing study must show that limited existing capacity  exists – New load must be required – Envision one substation per area IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 100
  101. 101. Goal of the Master Plan is to: • Determine the strengths and weaknesses of  existing system. • Determine the load growth potential. • Perform a reliability analysis. • List recently completed projects. • List identified problems from survey. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 101
  102. 102. Master plan should clearly  • List code related issues. • List grounding issues. • List lighting issues. • List area classification issues. • List maintenance department and operator complaints,  confirm these complaints. • List bad actors. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 102
  103. 103. System Studies • Can transmission system increases (larger transmission  transformers)  – bring more capacity to a distribution substation? – Limitation is the switchgear bus • Can the system utilization be improved through power  factor correction? • Can how the feeders are fed from the distribution  substations be optimized to isolate outages? • Can how the unit substations are fed from feeders be  optimized to isolate outages? IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 103
  104. 104. Safety • Entire system analyzed for shock and arc flash  hazards. • Problem areas are identified and corrected – Equipment Replacement – Settings Adjustments – Other arc flash mitigation techniques IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 104
  105. 105. Spare Equipment • Identify long lead items that have sufficient  risk of failing that extended downtime could  be avoided by having spare equipment onsite – Transformers – Breakers – Etc. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 105
  106. 106. Improve Maintainability Redundancy study of unit substations • Insure A & B pumps are fed from different substation sources  (Switchracks, and or MCC’s) at a minimum but ultimately different  substations. • Evaluate turn around schedule versus unit loads to ensure  substations can be shut down for maintenance. • Improve equipment maintenance through equipment design. • i.e. Draw out breakers are easier to maintain than bolt‐in breakers. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 106
  107. 107. Equipment Consolidation • Evaluate equipment and proposed projects  keeping in mind the goal of equipment  consolidation • I.e. instead of multiple smaller switchracks or  MCC ‘s or buildings, consolidate like  equipment into larger buildings (Power  Control Rooms). IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 107
  108. 108. Modernize Old Equipment • Equipment Replacement – Old equipment that can not meet existing  standards or be modernized should be replaced. – Cable Busses – Old Switchracks – Obsolete equipment should be replaced IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 108
  109. 109. Modernize equipment • Add new relays, breakers, etc. to equipment  that the core is still functional but better  technology exists for components. – Relay replacement projects – Breaker replacement projects IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 109
  110. 110. Not everything is the same. • One facilities bad actor may not be an issue at another  refinery/petro‐chemical facility. • Oil switches might fail for a variety of reasons,  • PILC cable with pot heads connect to the oil switch, might  have issues. • SF6 might work better in colder climates. • Some maintenance crews love PILC, others hate it and want  it all out of the ground. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 110
  111. 111. Refinery/petro‐chemical engineers and  managers need to know the following: • What are the lessons learned for refinery/petro‐chemical engineers and  managers when dealing with SIS systems or a lack of a good SIS system in  place?  – Complexity of operations and the pressure to control the number of operators  makes it more and more important to have a reliable SIS. • What are the lessons learned for refinery/petro‐chemical engineers and  managers when dealing with electrical distribution systems or a lack of a  good redundant electrical distribution system in place?  – Relief scenarios involving electrical distribution faults are complex and can be  worst case. • In your opinion what do refinery/petro‐chemical engineers and managers  need to know about master planning and making a petrochemical system  safe and reliable?  – PHA/LOPA should be extended to involve electrical distribution faults. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 111
  112. 112. Understand the Power Requirements • Total Connected Load  • Running Load – Rule of thumb in industrial facilities 90% of load  rotating and 10% of load static. • Utility Required Power Factor • Utility Required Harmonic Distortion  IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 112
  113. 113. Understand the Utility Connection • Voltage Level Available from the Utility • Utility Requirements for Connection – Most utilities have documents with their  requirements for connection – The utility will normally want to approve the one  line and layout. – Utility may require some space and equipment  inside the substation for metering. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 113
  114. 114. Understand the Internal Electrical  Distribution • Routing Power Cables in the Facility – Cable Tray – Duct Bank – Air Insulated Conductors • Unit Substation Size – 25‐MVA max for 15‐kV – 15‐MVA max for 5‐kV – 2.5‐MVA max for 480‐V • Unit Substation Voltage Levels – 15‐kV • 7.5‐kV – 5‐kV • 2400‐V – 480‐V IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 114
  115. 115. Understand your Unit Substation  Equipment • Power Center • Transformers • Switchgear • Motor Controllers IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 115
  116. 116. Understand the Power Centers • Locating – Classified Area – Blast Zone • Prefab – Elevation – Shipping Issues • Site Built – Building Penetrations – Equipment Access IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 116
  117. 117. Understand the Transformers • Transformer Sizing – Connected Load – Running Load • Transformer Impedance – Short Circuit – Arc Flash • Transformer Grounding – High Resistance Grounding • 5‐kV • 2400‐V • 480‐V – Low Resistance Grounding • 15‐kV • 27‐kV • 38‐kV IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 117
  118. 118. Understand Your Switchgear • Medium Voltage (38‐kV, 27‐kV, 15‐kV, 5‐kV) – Metal Clad – Arc‐Resistant – Nema 3R – Shelter Form • Low Voltage (600‐V) – Metal Enclosed – Arc‐Resistant – Nema 3R IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 118
  119. 119. Understand Your Motor Control  Centers (MCC) • Medium Voltage (5‐kV only) – Metal Enclosed – Arc Resistant – Nema 3R (Outdoor) • Low Voltage IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 119
  120. 120. Understand the Electrical Loads • Motors – Pump – Compressors – Fans • Variable Frequency Drives • Other Loads IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 120
  121. 121. Understand Your Motors • Motors – Medium Voltage Motors • Induction  • Synchronous – Low Voltage Motors • <250‐hp IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 121
  122. 122. Understand Your Substation  Configuration • Radial • Primary Selective • Double Ended – Tie Open – Tie Closed • Other Variations IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 122
  123. 123. Questions? • Vincent W. Wedelich *P.E. MBA • vwedelich@burnsmcd.com • 832‐214‐2804 main • 832‐932‐9236 cell • *licensed professional engineer in Texas. IEEE/AiChE Joint Presentation April 9, 2015  Rev. 0 For Educational, Safety, and Process  Improvement Purposes Only 123

×