eTwinning Ambassadors PDW

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eTwinning Ambassadors PDW

  1. 1. eTwinning PDW eTwinning Groups From pilots to a big scale! Riina Vuorikari October 1 2009
  2. 2. Riina, who? Riina Vuorikari from Finland, lives in Brussels since 1999 • Slides available: http://www.slideshare.net/vuorikari • Since 2000 worked in European Schoolnet • MEd in Finland, DEA in Hypermedia, PhD in November!!
  3. 3. What’s on your plate? • Goal: What can Ambassadors do for Groups? • Groups’ pilot: – examples of what Groups do – what have we learned • Roll out the eTwinning Groups: – Ambassadors’ key role in Groups – Next steps - describing Groups
  4. 4. A buffet of Groups? On Sunday, for each Groups, I would like to see: • A vision (what will this Group be about?) • A tagline (e.g “eTwinning, the community for schools in Europe”) • Some engagement and leadership taken (e.g. I will run this activity once a month in Spanish)
  5. 5. Groups = Thematic online communities Pilot Oct-Jan 09
  6. 6. Creativity
  7. 7. MST
  8. 8. School leaders
  9. 9. What are Groups about? • “ a community of practice is not really a thing, but rather a process in which social learning occurs because the people who participate in this process have a common interest in ..” • “The product of this process is the sharing of ideas, the finding of solutions to common problems and the building of a repository of available and new knowledge and expertise.” Kirschner & Lai (2007) Technology, Pedagogy and Education, 16, 2, pp. 127-131
  10. 10. Differences Learning Labs Groups • Structured activities • Less structured • Scheduled activities, up to participants • Lead by a • Less schedule “professional” • Moderator on the moderator background • Determined time • No clear end
  11. 11. Creative Classroom (1) • Members were invited to join the Group to “foster creativity at schools and in eTwinning projects” • About 40 teachers + one moderator • First: create your profile and introduce your self • Discussion activity: Does school kill creativity?
  12. 12. Creative Classroom (2) the Groups was to define • Their way to describe “creativity in learning” • Define their goals • Discussion lead to links in “creative” mini- projects using variety of tools • 35 bookmarks at: http://delicious.com/tag/etwinningcreativity
  13. 13. Creative classroom (3) • Scheduled events using Flashmeeting to “talk about Your project and creativity” • Scheduling events is important as teachers are busy. • This allows better planning of their time!
  14. 14. Like usual... no time!
  15. 15. Creative classroom (4) Different tools used: • Online community (Ning), e.g. creation of sub-groups based on interest, profiles and writing on walls, polls, forum, upload images • External tools, e.g. creating bookmark lists (delicious), integrate videos from YouTube, FlashMeeting
  16. 16. Activities in the Groups (5)
  17. 17. What have we learned? (1) • Leadership and teamwork skills are needed • There should be more than one “leader” in a group => Leadership team
  18. 18. What have we learned? (2) • Online leadership and teamwork skills – “good leaders need good followers” • Technical skills – use of ICTs in general and the platform in particular • Skills in content and substance – the stuff teachers know the best! • Different skills also needed for Ambassadors
  19. 19. Different roles (3) • Leaders: can be one or distributed – take responsibility and set the goals – determine how the group will achieve these goals • Core members: – e.g. subject matter experts, knowledge manager, content coordinator • Support persons: – e.g. mentors, tutors, event coordinators, technologist • Community members
  20. 20. Motivation does not always mean participation! (4)
  21. 21. Task orientation vs. process (5)
  22. 22. Ambassadors’ role? Plan, build, support and moderate Groups with other eTwinners! “Show leadership in building eTwinning Community”
  23. 23. Online leadership and teamwork skills • Vision and action – Set and attain goals, take initiative, add your energy to the group • Competences – Assign roles and be clear when delegating • “Expedition behaviour” – pitch in, be positive, serve group goals, respect others, work as a team
  24. 24. Ambassador’s roles in Groups • Leaders: can be one or distributed – take responsibility and set the goals – determine how the group will achieve these goals • Core members: – e.g. subject matter experts, knowledge manager, content coordinator • Support persons: – e.g. mentors, tutors, event coordinators, technologist • Community members: – “expedition behaviour”
  25. 25. Timeline 1. 2. 3... 1. Pilot 2. Ambassadors: Ideas and commitments for Groups - work in Chania. 3. Rolling out..
  26. 26. • Unified look and feel (“branding”) • More tools, e.g. wiki • No advertisements • No problems with school firewall • Log-in with the same eTwinning username • LifeRay (open source - more control!)
  27. 27. Group activity: Working on the proposed themes
  28. 28. A buffet of Groups? On Sunday, for each Groups, I would like to see: • A vision (what will this Group be about?) • A tagline (e.g “eTwinning, the community for schools in Europe”) • Some engagement and leadership taken (e.g. I will run this activity once a month in Spanish)
  29. 29. Group activity: Working on the proposed themes • Brainstorming in Groups for 1 h • Plan and build a foundation for your thematic Group • Continuation in workshop “building and sustaining online communities” • Sunday: 45 min to polish up and present your ideas to all
  30. 30. Now • Find your Group • Decide – who holds the pen and drafts ideas on the flipchart • Use the planning tool (8 questions) to get started • Try to answer to questions that make sense! • To be continued...
  31. 31. Building and sustaining online communities Riina Vuorikari CSS, European Schoolnet Chania Oct 2, 2009
  32. 32. Curious life of an online community • Online communities form, grow, mature and terminate = lifecycle • Each level has different issues and can be supported Lai et al. (2006) Literature Review and Synthesis: Online Communities of Practice
  33. 33. Lifecycle of an online community Phase 0: Planning. • Determine the scope and purpose of the CoP • Define roles of the CoP and assign/engage people • Make a skeleton of a plan for the CoP • Define how to evaluate whether the Group has been successful
  34. 34. Lifecycle of an online community Phase 1: Formation of the CoP • “CoPs should grow, not be implemented’ • Build trust by mandating “good profiles” • Develop clear policies such as code of conduct, community governance, netiquette, copyright • Plan activities that allow active participation, but also ‘lurking’
  35. 35. Lifecycle of an online community Phase 2: Sustain and manage CoPs. • Attract a diverse membership • Mentor new members • Delegate leadership (leader of the day) • Turn lurkers into active participants • Think “Glocal”! • Evaluate purpose and direction
  36. 36. Lifecycle of an online community Phase 3: Transformation or disengaging. • Expansion or fading away? • Evaluation of a CoP: on-going activity where the success is measured against its own goals (Phase 0)
  37. 37. "Learning is not only experience, but reflection on experience (Dewey 1938)" • In an online community, like that of Ambassadors on Ning or any other, what has been/is the biggest barrier for you to benefit from them? – write it on a post-it • What would be your solution to fix that? – write it on a post-it
  38. 38. Participation inequality J.Nilsen (2006) Participation inequality: Encouraging More Users to contribute

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