Web-Project-Management-Best-Practice-Guidelines

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Web-Project-Management-Best-Practice-Guidelines

  1. 1. Web Project Management The practices behind successful web projects E-consultancy, May 2007 Lead author: Sonia Kay Contributing Editors: Craig Hanna and Chris LakeCopyright © E-consultancy.com ltd 2006 1
  2. 2. Table of contents1. Executive Summary ..........................................................................3 1.1. Research aims ........................................................................................................... 3 1.2. Top 10 key findings and recomendations ................................................................ 32. Introduction ..................................................................................... 7 2.1. About this report ....................................................................................................... 7 2.2. Who is this report for? .............................................................................................. 7 2.3. About E-consultancy ................................................................................................ 8 2.4. What is Web Project Management? ......................................................................... 93. Research aim .................................................................................. 114. Methodology ................................................................................... 12 4.1. Sample ..................................................................................................................... 12 4.2. Questions ................................................................................................................. 12 4.3. Analysis .................................................................................................................... 145. Findings and Recommendations ..................................................... 15 5.1. The differences between web projects and other projects ..................................... 15 5.2. Biggest challenges facing web project managers .................................................... 16 5.3. Key drivers of success .............................................................................................. 18 5.4. A few words about agencies and consultancies ......................................................27 5.5. Building the right environment for success ............................................................ 31 5.6. Using the right methods and processes ................................................................. 48 5.7. Small projects need structure too ...........................................................................67 5.8. The essential project managers toolkit ................................................................... 716. Helpful resources ........................................................................... 727. References ...................................................................................... 728. Appendix 1 - The state of the nation................................................. 73 8.1. Quantitative research highlights .............................................................................73 8.2. Quantitative research results in full ........................................................................749. Appendix 2 – Interview Script ......................................................... 8110. Appendix 3 – Questions used in online survey ............................... 8211. Appendix 4 – Example of in-house adaptation of Prince ................ 88Copyright © E-consultancy.com ltd 2006 2
  3. 3. 1. Executive Summary 1.1. Research aimsThe purpose of this research is to fill the information gap around web project managementby learning from the experiences of organisations who are already out there managing webprojects.We’ve put this report together on the back of a combination of in-depth interviews andquantitative research.Specifically this research will… • Discover what makes some organisations and projects more successful at web projects than others; • Show what methodologies, tools and techniques are working, and which one’s aren’t; • Help you evaluate your own situation and work out the best approach to move forward. 1.2. Top 10 key findings and recomendations1. Nearly half of all respondents do not have a structured approach tomanaging their web projects.Nearly half of all respondents (45.5%) do not have a structured approach to managing theirweb projects. This rises to 67% in the retail industry. This can add up to bad news.Companies without a structured approach are the least likely to achieve their projectgoals, least likely to deliver customer satisfaction, are least able to deal with change duringthe course of the project and are less likely to achieve deadlines, meet budgets and deliverpositive ROI.Lack of processes and skills can mean that… • Teams don’t have visibility of the progress of the project and its’ associated risks and issues; • There isn’t a consistent vision of what the team are trying to deliver; • Estimation of the resources and effort required for the project involved is either poor or non-existent; • Projects are planned in isolation from the rest of the business and are consequently poorly supported.Copyright © E-consultancy.com ltd 2006 3
  4. 4. 2. Budgets and deadlines are difficult to controlNearly 58% of respondents say that their projects always achieve their goals, and yet only21% of them say they always achieve deadlines.Only 39% always achieve budget and a positive ROI.In fact over 8% of respondents never meet their project deadlines and nearly 6% neverdeliver their projects within budget. Ouch.3. Web projects are integrated with the rest of the business less than half of thetime, and customer satisfaction is hard to achieveFewer than half (46%) of respondents work to an annual plan that is aligned with theiroverall business strategy and only 56% say that they share common goals with the rest of thebusiness.Whilst nearly 80% say they involve the end customer in gathering requirements for theirprojects, and 72% involve the customer in testing, only half consistently achieve customersatisfaction with their projects.4. Teams know that their requirements will change during the course of theproject but yet they struggle to deal with it when it actually happensNearly 88% of respondents say that they set their requirements knowing that they areflexible to change during the course of the project, yet half of organisations say thatchanging requirements during the course of their projects is one of the biggest challengesthey face.5. Excellent project management is considered crucial to project success, butproject management methods are not valued, and many organisations don’tuse qualified project managers.Good communications and excellent project management are considered to be the two mostimportant factors in determining the success of a web project.However, 22% of projects are managed by members of the marketing or commercial teamrather than a qualified project manager.Knowledge of specific project management methods is considered to be the least importantskill in managing web projects.Copyright © E-consultancy.com ltd 2006 4
  5. 5. 6. Web projects are different from other projectsE-consultancy’s research identifies that web projects are different from other projectsbecause of their need to be responsive to… • changing customer requirements and market conditions, • the breadth of people and skills involved, • the raft of stakeholders, • frequently tight or fixed deadlines, • a degree of uncertainty, • and the need for interaction with real customers.Therefore web projects require a project management approach that helpswith… • Evolving requirements; • Putting focus on the end customer; • Collaboration between different skill sets; • Managing stakeholder expectations.7. Successful organisations have a structured approach to projects, and knowhow to apply a range of project management methods which can be tailored tothe circumstancesThe most successful organisations are able to tailor their approach to the specificcircumstances of the project and the organisation they are in, typically using a combinationof agile and traditional project management methods.8. Successful organisations think strategically but deliver tacticallyCompanies with a more evolved approach to e-commerce embrace flexibility and the abilityto deliver iterative, tactical change, because they are operating in highly competitiveenvironments (and as such they need to be able to respond to the rapidly-evolving needs ofthe customer).Despite this flexible approach, every project is aligned with the strategy of the overallbusiness, providing consistent direction.Copyright © E-consultancy.com ltd 2006 5
  6. 6. 9. In successful organisations collaboration is built into the process from thevery top of the organisation down.The culture and organisational structure of successful companies support effectivecollaboration between IT, E-commerce, Marketing and Management through; • Shared goals; • Sponsorship for projects at a senior level of the organisation; • Cross-functional steering groups who prioritise resource and provide guidance.10. Excellent project management is as much about managing the environmentas it is about managing the processSuccessful organisations recognise the importance of having a dedicated project manager. Agood project manager brings excellent communication and people skills, managing theenvironment around the project rather than just following a set of text book processes. 1.3. Creating a model which is predictive of successA maturity model has been defined to help organisations to benchmark their web projectmanagement prowess against other organisations.It identifies three key groups… 1. Early experimenters – Web not part of business strategy, little/no project management structure or skills 2. Frustrated visionaries – Projects aligned to business strategy, project management style not suited to web 3. Slick professionals – Web projects supported fully by whole company, sophisticated project managementThe model is based on a series of behaviours and practices that the research has shown tohave the most significant impact on a company’s ability to deliver successful projects.Copyright © E-consultancy.com ltd 2006 6
  7. 7. 2. Introduction 2.1. About this reportThis report describes the methodology and findings of a significant piece of researchconducted into web project management. It makes a number of recommendationsregarding web project management best practice on the basis of these findings, and theexperiences of those who have kindly agreed to take part. It also draws on the writing of wellrespected authorities in the fields of project management, software development and webproject management.The research was carried out in two main phases: Phase 1 focused on in-depth interviews to identify the characteristics and practices of successful web projects, and the main barriers to success. Phase 2 was designed to validate the findings of the first phase of research and allow quantitative measurement of the typical success rate of web projects using an online questionnaire.The interview discussion guide and a copy of the online survey are both published in full inthe Appendices of this report. 2.2. Who is this report for?This report is aimed at anyone involved in commissioning or delivering webprojects within their organisation, or on the behalf of a client organisation.The bulk of the report deals with the infrastructure, culture, practices and processesrequired to deliver medium to large web and e-commerce projects, although there are alsospecific findings and guidance relating to the delivery of smaller projects.The aim of the report is to enable those involved with web projects to identify the challengesthat are specific to them, and identify best practices and approaches that will helpthem overcome these challenges and improve their chances of success on future projects.It is important to note that this report does not recommend a specific approach or set ofprocesses as a ‘silver bullet’ to resolve all web project management challenges. Rather, ouraim is to provide the reader with the framework and information to help them determine forthemselves what their future practices should be.We hope it proves useful to you. We love receiving feedback, comments and, all beingwell, your testimonials. Send word to chris@e-consultancy.com.Copyright © E-consultancy.com ltd 2006 7
  8. 8. 2.3. About E-consultancyE-consultancy is an award-winning UK-based publisher of best practice internetmarketing reports, research and how-to guides, to help educate business people andmarketers about the internet and e-commerce.Founded in 1999, the company has grown to more than 52,000 registered users andoperates a paid-subscription model. Subscribers pay from as a little as £149 per year toaccess exclusive and highly practical content.E-consultancy also provides a range of public and in-house training programmes, such asseminars and workshops. It trained more than 3,000 internet professionals in 2006 andruns bespoke training programmes for well-known blue chips and SMEs.More than 100 exclusive E-consultancy events are lined up for 2007, including roundtablesand monthly Supplier Showcases, which remain highly popular.Web Project ManagementBased on this research E-consultancy is running a programme of training seminars specificto Web Project Management.Upcoming dates for these courses are… Manchester 25th April, 2007 Manchester 4th July, 2007 London 10th July, 2007 London 13th September, 2007 Manchester 25th September 2007 London 20th November, 2007 Manchester 22nd November, 2007If you are interested in attending any of these sessions please email viv@e-consultancy.com,or see our website’s training channel for more detail.E-consultancy also held a roundtable forum of E-commerce managers and project managersto discuss the findings of this research, the outputs of which can be found on our website.Copyright © E-consultancy.com ltd 2006 8
  9. 9. 2.4. What is Web Project Management? What is a project?In ‘A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge’ (PMBOK Guide) a project isdefined as: “A temporary endeavour undertaken to create a unique product, service or result”What is significant about this definition is that it distinguishes projects from the everydaywork of running of a business. Projects run alongside business as usual operations andtypically deliver a change that needs to be integrated back into the business, at thecompletion of the project. What is Project Management? “Project management is the application of knowledge, skills, tools and techniques to project activities to meet project requirements” (PMBOK, 2005)Sometimes carried out by a professional project manager, at other times projectmanagement is an activity carried out by another member of the project team. You don’tnecessarily have to be a project manager to manage projects.There are a few universal truths for any project which are reflected in every ProjectManagement methodology: 1. There is always a customer, the project is always being delivered for someone; 2. There is always a project team, no matter how big or small; 3. There should always be a goal, otherwise why are you doing the project? 4. It ultimately comes down to managing the iron triangle… Cost Quality TimeThe iron triangle represents the three key elements of a project: cost, quality and time.Altering one of these variables will impact the other two. For instance, if you need to reducethe time to complete a project you will either have to risk reduced quality, or pay moremoney to ensure the same quality in less time.Copyright © E-consultancy.com ltd 2006 9
  10. 10. Web Project ManagementThe fundamentals of project management are the same, whatever the project, but there area number of challenges inherent to web projects which often prevent teams fromdelivering their projects on time, on budget and to the satisfaction of their internal andexternal customers. These challenges are outlined in more detail in section 5.1.In the experience of the participants of this research there is no single approach that is aperfect fit for web projects.Many organisations have embarked on journeys of experimentation and adaptation to arriveat processes that work for them. It is from documenting these experiences that we have beenable to build a new body of knowledge that supports the notion of web project managementas a separate activity.At its most basic level Web Project Management is about creating the rightenvironment for the delivery of web projects. One with the following characteristics: • Just enough structure to help rather than hinder progress; • The flexibility to work with evolving requirements; • Focus on and involvement of the end customer; • Effective collaboration between different skill sets and departments; • Manages the expectations of multiple stakeholders; • Enables rapid deployment of priority features.Copyright © E-consultancy.com ltd 2006 10
  11. 11. 3. Research aimE-consultancy felt that there was a big gap for this sort of research, and so we decided to dosomething about it. We are experienced in web project management, having created,launched and operated many websites for ourselves and for third parties. Indeed, athorough revamp of the E-consultancy website has just begun, a project anticipated to take ayear before it comes to fruition.Moreover, this research was undertaken in response to a growing need for guidance onweb project management best practice from people working at the sharp end of the internetindustry.As ever, our guidance is based on practical experience rather than theoretical knowledge ofmanaging web projects. People say that this is where E-consultancy really stands out fromthe crowd, and we hope this guide will prove to be a valuable addition to the existingresearch available on at www.e-consultancy.com/research.Specifically this research aims to… • Discover what makes some organisations and projects more successful at web projects than others; • Show what methodologies, tools and techniques are working, and which one’s aren’t; • Help subscribers evaluate their own situation and work out the best approach for them.Our research is not intended as a training manual for any specific project managementmethod or process, but we think it articulates the ideal environment for managing webprojects.It also provides an insight into some of the wide range of project management techniquesavailable.Copyright © E-consultancy.com ltd 2006 11
  12. 12. 4. Methodology 4.1. SamplePhase 1 of the research comprised of 18 depth interviews with representatives fromdifferent organisations, across a wide range of industries including travel, financial services,telecommunications, retail and agency. The respondents were chosen because they areresponsible for either commissioning or managing web projects within their organisation.The purpose of this first phase was to identify the characteristics and practices of successfulweb projects, and identify the main barriers to success.Interviews were conducted with senior representatives from the respective internet teams atthe likes of: MyTravel, Sony Ericsson, Sony Business Services, Axa-PPP, Alliance andLeicester, BSI, First Choice, Framfab, Henderson Global Investors, Lloyds, Code, O2,Opodo, P&O and Signet.Phase 2 was designed to validate the findings of the first phase of research and allowquantitative measurement of the typical success rate of web projects, and the maturity of UKorganisations in their approach to web projects. This phase was conducted via an onlinesurvey to the E-consultancy newsletter subscriber base. The survey was completed by 633individuals (about 5% of our newsletter readers). 4.2. QuestionsIn order to satisfy the aims of the research it was necessary to evaluate what skills andresources are necessary to run web projects and also how projects are influenced by andinteract with the wider organisation.In order to do this we borrowed a strategic framework already seen in E-consultancy’s in-depth study: ‘Managing an E-commerce team: Integrating digital marketing into yourorganisation’.The structure for his study was based on a strategic framework devised by McKinseyConsultants – The 7S strategic framework. In it each “S” represents a key issue that needs tobe addressed. We have applied this framework equally effectively to the practice ofmanaging Web projects, and it has been used in this research to highlight the key issues thatneed to be managed in order for a company to deliver its projects with a degree of success.This framework formed a backdrop for the first phase of qualitative research, which thendefined the quantitative survey which was used in phase two. The interview discussion guideand a copy of the online survey are both published in full in the Appendices of this report.Copyright © E-consultancy.com ltd 2006 12
  13. 13. Element of 7S Application to Web Project Key issuesmodel ManagementStrategy Annual planning approach, aligning Being part of organisation wide planning projects with organisational and process marketing strategy, gaining appropriate budget and resource, delivering value Effective prioritisation of web projects to align with business goals – roadmapping Being part of a programme of work In-built flexibility to adapt to fast moving environment Digital strategy as collaboration between IT / Marketing / Digital / CommercialStructure Modification of organisational structure Cross-functional steering and cross- to support digital projects functional teams Common goals and targets Integration between IT / Marketing / Mgt Where does project/programme mgt function sit? AccountabilitySystems Development of specific processes, Adoption of structured approach to PM. procedures and information systems to support digital projects Approach communicated and used by whole team/organisation Approach is fit for purpose – speed, quality, flexibility, scale Visibility of the project – timescales, issues, resource Effective process for gathering and refining requirements Role of customer / end user in the process Choosing the right supporting software Effective resource estimation and allocationStaff Breakdown of staff in terms of Senior level sponsorship background and characteristics, location, insource/outsource, part-time Diversity of backgrounds, skills and vs. dedicated understanding of web technology Dedicated PM function vs. managing projects as a part-time task IT Project Manager vs. Commercial Project managerStyle The way key managers behave in Shared ownership and decision making achieving the organisational goals, and vs. working in competing silos the cultural style of the organisation as a whole Organisational culture main driver ofCopyright © E-consultancy.com ltd 2006 13
  14. 14. process/method Techniques to nurture collaboration across functions Co-location Fear of permanent betaSkills Distinctive capabilities of key staff Breadth of skills required across the project Project management skills, training and experience PM balance between technical, commercial and people skills Experience of working in web projects Availability of expert technical resource Ability to evolve and embrace new technologySuper-ordinate goals The guiding concepts of the organisation Improving the effectiveness of cross- which are part of shared values and functional teams through education and culture involvement in the process. Give the organisation understanding so they can embrace the potential of the web channel 4.3. AnalysisThe Clicktools analysis tool was used extensively in the quantitative phase of the researchand enabled responses to be cross-tabulated and filtered. For example;• Cross referencing specific attributes and practices against their impact on success• Analysing the relationship between project management method and o Success o Culture o Challenges o Practices o Requirements gathering o Nature of deadlines• Cross referencing culture against success• Filtering to establish the impact on success of the predictive model• Filtering the model behaviours to quantify the volume of respondents at each stage of the modelCopyright © E-consultancy.com ltd 2006 14
  15. 15. 5. Findings and Recommendations 5.1. The differences between web projects and other projectsThe interviews conducted in the early stages of this research supported the view that webprojects have challenges of their own which set them apart from other kinds of projects.Web projects draw on a huge range of people and skills – Marketing, commercial,design, usability, accessibility, information architecture, programming, databasedevelopment, application development, integration with legacy systems, back office supportand fulfilment. It’s not enough for each area to own one chunk of the project and then put itinto a black box for someone else to integrate. Multi-discipline teams need to worktogether to define whole solutions that maximise the technology’s’ potential to fulfil thecustomers’ needs.Because of this diversity of interests, most web projects also tend to attract a huge array ofstakeholders and hangers on. It’s also fair to say that in some organisations, web is stillperceived as ‘quick and easy’ so project managers have to manage varied and unrealisticexpectations.Web development tends to be an iterative process. Enhancing functionality throughsmaller, more frequent releases is the most effective way to keep up with the fast paceof change in consumer habits and technology. Plus the volume of data available on howcustomers interact with your website makes it impossible these days not to find ways tocontinuously improve conversion or loyalty.Hand in hand with a fast paced, competitive environment and demanding customers comesfixed deadlines, primarily driven by product launches and advertising campaigns.Many projects are made more complicated by the need to integrate cutting edgeapplications with legacy systems, which typically means that there are lots ofunknowns.The requirements of a web project are often less defined at the outset, partly because it isdifficult to second guess how the audience is going to interact with a three dimensionalcustomer experience. It’s not uncommon for requirements to be refined as part of thedesign process, and prototyping is sometimes used to aid this.The web channel represents your company’s window to the outside world, so if your projectsgo wrong the evidence is there for all your customers to see and experience in the formof poor usability, confusing navigation, frustratingly slow page downloads, underwhelmingcontent, impossible to complete transactions and error messages. Key Finding Take the time to ensure that you and other key stakeholders understand the unique challenges inherent with web projects. This will help manage unrealistic expectations from the business.Copyright © E-consultancy.com ltd 2006 15
  16. 16. 5.2. Biggest challenges facing web project managersAll our research participants were asked to identify the top three challenges they facedin delivering web projects. Their responses served to highlight the fact that a huge numberof organisations are struggling with challenges that are inherent to the nature of webprojects! Elements of their environment and / or processes are inadequate for thetasks they are being asked to carry out.Resoundingly, the biggest challenge facing web project managers is changing requirementsduring the course of the project. This is a defining feature of web projects, and can’t beavoided unless organisations are prepared to go back to producing brochure-ware and stopstriving for meaningful customer interaction. Chart 1 – Biggest challenges in managing web projects 60 50 50 40 % of respondents 33 31 30 27 27 23.5 19 20 16 15 14 10 0 n ut e ns e s e ts ts ills s tio rc at tim en en p ce tio sk in u im ra m rm so o a on r st of bo pr ct ire se re ui re pe ut ck la M ru qu eq de p ol p ex La rP ee re r in o rc un Po or /K tic ea to e o s at pe et Po is cl er ils ul al G o p o fa tic e sc lo N nr s ar e es g U ev in to n D ng si e Bu bl ha na C U Most frequent challenges (n=527)Ironically most organisations, 87.67% according to our survey, set their requirementsknowing that they need to be flexible to change. The fact that 50% still consider this to beone of the biggest challenges in their projects simply highlights the fact that they areunprepared for change when it needs to happen, or when it happens anyway.All project management methodologies will state that they have a mechanism for dealingwith change within the project. But organisations need to understand that there is a world ofdifference between managing change as an exception to the project, and embracing changeas part of the process. “Our problem was that the environment was constantly changing – you start off in waterfall with a big scope and then during the journey there would be continuous re-scoping because of unforeseen changes. So by the time you deliver it’s different to what you set off with and the business is disappointed”.Copyright © E-consultancy.com ltd 2006 16
  17. 17. The next most significant challenges are the unrealistic expectations of the business andfailure of the business to provide adequate input at the right time. Once again, this isprobably symptomatic of one of the major challenges of web projects.The fact that there are a myriad of stakeholders and skill sets involved in web projects,means that managing the appropriate level of involvement from all parties can be aphenomenal communications task. • Key Finding The results from the questionnaire serve to reinforce the view that web projects require a project management approach that helps with: • Evolving requirements • Putting focus on the end customer • Collaboration between different skill sets • Managing stakeholder expectationsCopyright © E-consultancy.com ltd 2006 17
  18. 18. 5.3. Key drivers of successDuring the interview stage of this research it became clear that organisations that aresuccessful in delivering web projects share similar behaviours. We can see that success is notdriven by the size of the organisation, which specific methodology they used or even theteam structure.Instead, the key to running successful web projects appears to be nothing more that acollaborative and communicative culture, supported by structured practicesand processes that are appropriate to the individual project and the organisation.The most successful organisations had these attributes in common: Statements of a mature organisation • Think strategically but deliver tactically • Projects aligned with business strategy • Sponsorship at senior level of the organisation • Cross-functional steering to prioritise resource and provide guidance • Collaboration between IT, Marketing and Management • Shared goals • Structured approach to projects, which is appropriate to the needs of the business. This often means using different approaches for different kinds of projects. • Driven by business/customer needs • Dedicated project management resource • Flexibility to respond to change • Focus on the requirements that deliver the greatest benefitFor the purposes of statistical analysis and producing a predictive model, these statementswere translated into specific practices which were then incorporated into the quantitativestudy: • Flexibility in requirements • Involvement of the end user in defining requirements • Having a Project Manager • Having a structured approach to managing web projects • Highly collaborative culture • Highly communicative culture • An annual plan that is aligned with the overall business strategy • Shared goals with the rest of the business • A business wide approach to prioritising resource • Cross-functional steering • Senior sponsors for projectsA final influence, less easily quantified, was whether an organisation was able todemonstrate using different approaches for different kinds of projects.Key FindingDelivering a successful project is as much about managing the environment as it is about managingthe process.Copyright © E-consultancy.com ltd 2006 18
  19. 19. Most of us do some of the right thingsThe model will demonstrate that it is a combination of practices that drive significantimprovements in the success rates of projects. But some behaviours are moreimportant than others, and the good news is that UK businesses are already doing a lotof the right things.The table below shows the percentage of respondents already demonstrating the behavioursand practices that are critical to success. The practices that have the most tangible impact onsuccess are marked with stars. Chart 2 – Percentage of respondents who demonstrate key success factors Multiple approaches 17.1 Cross-functional steering 28.9 Business wide prioritisation 34.9 Snr Sponsors 38.4 Align with business strategy 38.4 Shared goals 46.6 Highly communicative 49.8 Structured approach 54.2 High collaboration 54.5 Have a PM 55.5 User drives requirements 66.2 Flexible requirement 75.2 Baseline 100.0 0.0 20.0 Percentage of respondents 40.0 60.0 80.0 100.0 120.0 Key finding (n = 631) Some factors have a larger, clearer influence on the likely success of a project. The top four factors are: § creating a highly collaborative environment § having a structured approach § aligning projects with business strategy § business wide prioritisation of resource.Copyright © E-consultancy.com ltd 2006 19
  20. 20. A model for successful Web Project ManagementThe quantitative study enabled data relating to over 600 companies to be mapped onto amaturity model, to establish whether these key behaviours were truly predictive of success.Each success factor was input according to how widespread its’ practice is i.e. the mostcommonly followed behaviours first, with the least common and arguably moresophisticated practices at the end of the model, as illustrated in the table above. Mature organisations are more successfulBy looking at a combination of which key success factors had been adopted by a company,and the perception of success they had achieved against the following criteria, we were ableto demonstrate a clear link between the adoption of best practice (via the criticalsuccess factors) and the increased success of a project.How would you rate the success of your projects on the following criteria? Never Sometimes Always Achieves goals Meets deadlines Meets budget Customer satisfaction Involvement of the end user Embraces flexibility during development Delivers ROIWithout doubt some elements of the model are more significant than others in drivingsuccess, but no single attribute guarantees success on its own. The model represents, at ahigh level, an ideal blend of company culture, organisational structure, skills and practices.The most successful organisations do all or many of these things. The following charts showhow different facets of the model impact some of the success criteria.Copyright © E-consultancy.com ltd 2006 20
  21. 21. Score out of 3 Score out of 3 2 1.9 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.45 2.55 2.65 2.75 2.85 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 2.8 2.9 Baseline Baseline Flexible requirements Flexible requirements Customer at Customer at requirements gathering requirements gatheringCopyright © E-consultancy.com ltd 2006 Have a PM Have a PM Collaboration Collaboration Structured approach Structured approach Communicative Adoption of Model Adoption of Model Communicative Shared goals Shared goals Align with bus strategy Align with bus strategy Snr Sponsors Chart 4 - They are more likely to meet deadlines Snr Sponsors Business wide Business wide prioritisation prioritisation Cross functional Cross functional steering steering Chart 3 - Companies further up the model = more likely to achieve their goals. (n = 631) (n = 631)21
  22. 22. Chart 5 - They are better at staying within budget 2.7 2.65 2.6 2.55 2.5 Score out of 3 2.45 2.4 2.35 2.3 2.25 Adoption of Model 2.2 2.15 Align with bus strategy Have a PM Business wide Baseline Collaboration Structured approach Shared goals Snr Sponsors Cross functional requirements gathering Flexible requirements Communicative prioritisation steering Customer at (n = 631) Chart 6 - They are better at dealing with change in the project. 2.75 2.7 2.65 2.6 2.55 Score out of 3 2.5 2.45 2.4 2.35 Adoption of Model 2.3 2.25 Align with bus strategy Have a PM Business wide Baseline Collaboration Structured approach Shared goals Snr Sponsors Cross functional requirements gathering Flexible requirements Communicative prioritisation steering Customer at (n = 631)Key findingIt’s possible to apply a model that is predictive of success. Respondents at the top of the model scoredthemselves as 92.38% successful, versus the average which was 79.76%.Copyright © E-consultancy.com ltd 2006 22
  23. 23. The model applied Discussions with client and agency organisations suggested that there are three main categories to describe an organisations’ maturity in delivering web projects. The survey data enabled the size of these groups to be quantified. Chart 7 – Shows where the biggest improvements in success occur and the location of the three main groupings in terms of their adoption of the model Early Frustrated Slick Experimenter Visionaries Professionals 83% 14.2% 2.8% 120.0 Involves end user Meets deadlines 100.0 Achieves goals% of respondents 80.0 Meets Budgets 60.0 Customer satisfaction Flexibility in dev 40.0 Delivers ROI 20.0 Adoption of model 0.0 ts g es n gy ch e t n s M en s e in en iv io t io al or ch te in oa P er at at m go m ra el ns ra oa te ic a is pr ir e ir e as bo st po rit un ls d e ap pr qu av re qu B l la io ss S na m ap ha pr ed re H re co m nr ne t io le S ur e co e S es si h nc l id tip ib ct ig bu r iv y w fu ul ex tr u H hl - rd s m ith Fl ig ss S es H w as se ro in n U C H us lig B A (n=631) Although success rates consistently improve the further along the model you go, each of the markers on the diagram above serve to illustrate the point at which the most considerable improvements occur. Key finding Although some elements of the model are more significant than others in driving success no single attribute guarantees success on its own. Organisations should strive to adopt as many of the success criteria as possible in order to deliver value and ROI. Copyright © E-consultancy.com ltd 2006 23
  24. 24. Early Experimenters Early experimenters tend to be relatively new to delivering web projects. The web channel is typically seen as a tactical tool rather than a channel that is integrated into the overall strategic plan of the business. This can be problematic. It can mean that e-commerce initiatives operate in a vacuum and the opportunities and benefits are not fully realised by the wider organisation. On the one hand this means that the project team will typically have a lot of empowerment (while things are going well), but at times the lack of support from a senior sponsor can be to the detriment of the project. A particular challenge can be getting and keeping the right resources for the job. This mode is typified by a lack of formal process, or having to operate with processes that aren’t always suited to web projects. There will usually be some organisational tools such as work schedules, project updates and team meetings but these are often applied in an ad hoc manner. The knock-on effects of a lack of structured approach are discussed more fully later in this document. There is unlikely to be a full-time project manager in place, although IT project managers may get involved where there is integration with legacy systems. Projects are completed purely as a result of the sheer determination of the individuals within the project team. Nothing more. Working in this mode can be maintained for a while, but typically issues can occur when: • projects increase in their size or complexity • web gets a higher profile in the business • more stakeholders come out of the woodwork • there are more projects and/or fewer resources available • key team members leaveKey FindingWeb projects need to be part of an overall business strategy. When this isn’t the case the project teamoperate in a vacuum without the appropriate tools and techniques to make their projects a success.The business case for appropriate resource is doomed to fail because the project is not contributing tothe priority objectives of the business.Copyright © E-consultancy.com ltd 2006 24

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