Entertainment safety 12 29 10

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  • Limited to place where entertainment events are held such as plays, concerts, sports, and other forms of entertainment. Movie and production companies were added because of similar accidents were occurring. Amusement parks and horse racing were excluded. SIC 78 was the concentrated area.
  • The accident happened October 20, 2010 Photo Joe Reynolds AP – it is copyrighted Authorities were investigating the incident. The hydraulic scissor lift, which can be lowered or raised depending on needs, stretched across a nearby street. According to one report, the tower stood about 50 feet above the ground. Winds in the area were gusting to 51 mph at the time, according to the National Weather Service, and the team practiced indoors Tuesday because of the blustery conditions. Sullivan indicated via his Twitter account that he was in a dangerous predicament. According to a report from WTSB in South Bend, Sullivan posted the following tweet at 3:22 p.m. ET, just as practice was beginning: "Gusts of wind up to 60 mph. Well today will be fun at work. I guess I've lived long enough." Then, at 4:06 p.m. according to the station, Sullivan posted another tweet: "Holy (blank). Holy (blank). This is terrifying.“ http:// sports.espn.go.com/ncf/news/story?id =5734494 http://newsinfo.nd.edu/news/17292-homily-for-declan-sullivan/
  • http://www.businessweek.com/ap/financialnews/D9K937JG0.htm From Lights! Camera! Actions! (second to last slide) FATALITY/INJURY STATISTICS Fatalities The Center for Safety in the Arts has compiled a list of 40 fatalities from 1980-89 in motion picture and television production (see Table 1-1). This includes fatalities in American films and in films shot abroad by American companies or their subsidiaries. Of these 40 fatalities, 21 occurred while doing stunts or special effects. Only 8 of the 21 stunt or special effects fatalities involved stunt performers; the other stunt fatalities included 4 camera operators or related crew, 6 actors, 1 pilot, and 2 bystanders. The important conclusion to be drawn from this is that stunts and special effects put not only stunt performers at risk, but also everyone else on the set as well. Of the remaining 19 fatalities, all 9 of the fatalities that occurred during ordinary filming, and 5 of the 10 non-filming fatalities involved helicopters (and one airplane accident). The rest of the fatalities involved accidents on the set (electrocution, a crane accident, and being hit by a truck and a steel beam, and a blank gun accident). High risk stunts are clearly not the only hazard on the set. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Table 1-1. Motion Picture/Television Production: Fatalities 1980-89 1980 Rodney Mitchell (cameraman) TV Series: "Dukes of Hazzard". Circumstances: car chase 1980 Robert Van Der Kar (cameraman) TV Series: "Magnum PI". Circumstances: helicopter accident 1980 unknown stuntwoman * Film. Circumstances: fall from roof. 1980 unknown male (producer) * Film: unknown Circumstances: hit by steel beam 1981 Jack Tyre (stuntman) Film: "Sword and the Sorcerer". Circumstances: falling off cliff stunt. 1981 Boris Sagol (director) TV Film: "World War III". Circumstances: helicopter accident 1981 unknown male (camera assistant) * Film. Circumstances: hit by truck 1982 Jack Tandberg (cameraman) TV Film: "The Five of Me". Circumstances: car chase 1982 David Perrin (stunt pilot), Jaron Anderson (mechanic), Nigel Thornton (helicopter pilot). Film: "High Road to China" Circumstances: helicopter crash en route to location in Yugoslavia 1982 Vic Morrow, Myca Dinh Lee, Renee Chen (performers) Film: "The Twilight zone". Circumstances: helicopter accident. 1983 Joseph Leonard Svec (skydiver) Film: "The Right Stuff". Circumstances: skydiving accident 1984 Jon Eric-Hexum (actor) TV Series: "Cover-Up". Circumstances: blank gunshot 1985 Art Scholl (stunt pilot) Film: "Top Gun". Circumstances: airplane accident 1985 Reid Rondell (stuntman) TV Series: "Airwolf" Circumstances: helicopter accident 1985 Claudio Cassinelli (actress), Don Nasca (pilot) Film: "Hands of Stone". Circumstances: helicopter accident 1985 Rich Holley (pilot) Film: "Runaway Train". Circumstances: helicopter accident en route to Alaska filming location 1985 unknown stuntman * Entertainment production. Circumstances: fall from height. 1986 Dar Robinson (stuntman) Film: "Million Dollar Mystery". Circumstances: motorcycle stunt 1986 Bruce Ingram (cameraman) Film: "The Wraith". Circumstances: car chase 1986 Martin Wenzel and Conrad Wenzel (bystanders) Film: "Gor". Circumstances: gas cylinder explosion-fire scene in South Africa. 1986 unknown fatality ** Film: unknown Circumstances: crane accident 1987 Victor Magnotta (stuntman) Film: "Skip Tracer". Circumstances: car stunt 1987 4 unknown fatalities Film: "Braddock: "Missing in Action III". Circumstances: helicopter crash in Philippines. 1988 Patrick Dungan (electrician) Film: "Men Don't Leave". Circumstances: electrocution 1989 Geoff Brewer (stuntman), Gadi Danzig (camera man), Michael Graham (key grip), Jojo Imperial (pilot), Don Marshall (gaffer). Film: "Delta Force 2". Circumstances: helicopter crash in Philippines. 1989 Clint Carpenter (stuntman) Film: "Hired to Kill". Circumstances: helicopter stunt in Corfu. 1989 Tobi Halicki (director) Film: "Gone in 60 Seconds II". Circumstances: falling water tower special effect. Sources: * National Traumatic Occupational Fatality Database (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) ** California Division of Labor Statistics and Research news clippings from the Cinema: Accidents file of the Lincoln Center Library for Performing Arts.
  • http://www.lvrj.com/multimedia/Death-in-a-Showroom-98146624.html Image from Las Vegas Review Journal July 11, 2010 it is copyrighted Las Vegas stagehand Vicente Rodriguez fell to his death from a rigging plank suspended over the MGM Grand's Hollywood Theater. If the planking had been equipped with guardrails, the 20-year-old -- who was incorrectly wearing his safety harness -- might be alive today. MGM Grand paid a penalty of $19,800, down from a proposed penalty of $38,700. Rhino Las Vegas, the stage company, must pay a $4,000 penalty, according to terms of a settlement reached in late May. The original fine proposed for Rhino was $25,000. Occupations such as construction, offshore drilling, mining and logging are routinely viewed as dangerous, while risks to entertainment workers are not always well-publicized, Michaels told the media. Most of the public knows that an animal trainer died during a performance at SeaWorld Orlando in February, but fewer people realize Disney World also suffered several work-related fatalities last year. http://www.lvrj.com/news/fatal-plunge-by-stagehand-stirs-questions-of-safety--fines-95599114.html
  • From Vincente Enrique’s mother, Marychris Rodriguez: “Thirty-three inches of false ceiling, having to stand on a "rounded" top-rail to clip into his life-line 52" away, I think those measurements and the video of the medieval work site speak for itself. The person that took him up there broke rules of safety himself....he had no harness and jumped across. Then in two statements, one to the coroner, and one to OSHA he states: " I pointed were he should hook up, I turned, and there was a hole where the decedent should have been." Five seconds of this guys life would have saved my son, he had worked in that theatre for 8 years, "Here dude, let me hook you up." Furthermore, the harness my son was wearing, they went to look for in someone's car, Vicente was not hired as a "high rigger" therefore, he did not carry a harness, but he WAS wearing it correctly, and that is important to clarify. “
  • Causes of incidents: See Causes sheet. 42 falls: includes 8 falls from ladder, 4 falls from catwalk, 2 scaffolds, 2 aerial lifts 35 struck object: 14 saw blades, 13 falling objects (8 vehicle loads), 3 struck by flying object, 10 collapses: 5 aerial lifts, 2 forklifts, 2 ladders, 1 scaffold 7 burns: 4 pyrotechnics. 2 arc blasts, 1 gunpowder 6 caught in/between: 4 pyrotechnic explosions 16 other: 4 inhalation of CO, 3 hearing loss, 2 pedestrian struck by vehicle, 2 motor vehicle incidents, Activity: See Activity sheet
  • Atlanta Ballet’s wrangling with the federal government over a 2007 “Nutcracker” accident might be coming to an end. http://www.ajc.com/services/content/metro/stories/2009/02/07/ballet0207.html The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has withdrawn punitive action against Atlanta Ballet for a case involving a 17-year-old dancer who fell about 12 feet into the orchestra pit at the Fox Theatre, according to ballet executive director Barry Hughson. Hughson said he is “very happy” about the ruling. However, OSHA spokeswoman Leni Fortson said Friday that the case remains open. It is OSHA policy not to comment on open cases, she said. Leah Boresow, who was then a high school senior from Alpharetta, was dressed in a panda costume with limited visibility during a December 2007 performance of “The Nutcracker.” Although the ballet at the time was performing to recorded music, the pit floor was lowered as if an orchestra had been there. Boresow required spinal surgery from injuries she sustained from the fall. Last year, OSHA fined the ballet $3,500 for failing to have a guardrail or equivalent system in place while the pit was lowered. After more than six months of legal discussions, OSHA and the ballet came to an agreement, said Hughson. The fine was canceled, he said Friday. The only steps the ballet company needs to take now, he added, “is to put its long-standing safety procedure into the employee handbook.” Boresow has since graduated from Chattahoochee High School and is in college. The OSHA 1997 letter of interpretation was the first step which was not understood by the industry and ignored You also asked what regulations apply to the riggers, truss spot operators and others in theater who regularly work at heights at the 75' to 150' range, and whether a climbing belt "Swiss seat" that is used as a positioning device can no longer be used as a fall protection device. As a rigger, using a climbing belt "Swiss seat" as a positioning device may be permissible, but as you correctly assume, you can not use it as a fall protection device . The climbing belt "Swiss seat" should at least meet the proposed requirements for positioning device systems in section 1910.130 of the April 10, 1990, Federal Register Notice of Proposed Rulemaking. A copy is enclosed for your information. A full body harness would be an appropriate fall protection device for working at 75' to 150' OSHA is concerned with the safety and health of all workers in the entertainment industry. Although OSHA recognizes it is not appropriate to put guardrails at the edge of stages, theatrical employees need to be protected from all occupational safety and health hazards. The fall protection standards for general industry (found in Subpart D of 29 CFR at 1910.21 through 1910.32) as well as the personal protective equipment standards (found in Subpart I of 29 CFR at 1910.132 through 1910.138) are the appropriate standards for your situation. finally, the settlement of the Atlanta Ballet citation requiring a written program in their dance book containing the requirements for special blocking, lights at the leading edge, etc. then the CalOSHA 2002 ALJ decision on the San Francisco Opera on stage set fall protection citation was the next big wake up call On June 27, 2002 San Francisco Opera stagehand Francis Kenny suffered a broken leg and head trauma after falling 22 feet from a hydraulic lift while removing scenery. Now the Opera has been fined $70,000 by the California Occupational Safety and Health Administration for allegedly knowing it was improperly using the lift when it tipped over and sent Kenny crashing to the floor. Cal-OSHA, which has cited the Opera more than a dozen times for code violations since 1996 -- most of them considered minor but a few listed as "serious" -- says the Opera committed a "willful serious violation" by taking off two of the lift's four stabilizing "outriggers," or legs to fit it into a tight space.
  • Employee #1 was a prop maker and welder for the makers of the "Pirates of the Caribbean III" movie. He was working on a structure intended to be used underwater as a supporting stand. It weighed 4,700 lbs and was constructed from I- beams. The structure was being raised to weld the underside. It was rigged with 2 3-ft polyester slings attached to the ends of an 8 ft 4 in. steel spreader bar, which weighed 100 lbs. The slings were placed through Crosby screw-pin shackles that were rated for 3.25 tons and attached to the spreader bar. The spreader bar was attached to an 18-in. long polyester sling and slung over one fork of a JLG Telehandler, Model Number G10-55A, forklift. The slings were manufactured by Olympic Synthetic Products, Incorporated. The rated capacity of each sling was 5,300 lbs. The structure had been lifted twice. On the third lift, the top sling broke and the structure fell injuring Employee #1. He was hospitalized for multiple fractures of both legs and feet. 126152594 Allan Randal 40MHospitalized Fracture Construction Trades, N.E.C 1. 01001 Other5042 A0903/30/200704/17/2007X 225 225 0 - 2. 02001 Serious5042 A0703/30/200704/17/2007X 2700 2700 0
  • On January 18, 2009, Employee #1 was working as a Stage Carpenter at the woodworking shop of the Orpheum Theatre, located at 1182 Market Street, San Francisco. At approximately 9:00 am, Employee #1 was ripping an 8-foot long wet Douglas fir lumber on a table saw (Delta, Unisaw, 10" Right Tilting Arbor Saw, Model 36-812) to make a kick rail (1" X 1.5" X 8') for the back of the stage. The table saw had been routinely used without its guard assembly. He was pushing the stock with his right hand using a push block. While he was ripping the last foot of the stock, his left thumb got in the path of the running blade (10" carbide-tip, 50-tooth ripping blade) and amputated its tip. Employee #1 was transported to CPMC - Davies Campus by paramedics. The District Office was notified by both the Fire Department and the Employer later that day. On January 21, 2009, Compliance Officer inspected the scene of the accident and interviewed the witnesses. The cause of the accident was failure to use the blade guard assembly. Employer was cited with one serious accident-related violation. T8 CCR 4300.1(a) requires that all manually fed table saws be guarded by a hood which completely encloses the portion of the saw blade above the table as well as the portion of the blade above the material being cut. Other violation of Title 8 was observed and the Employer was cited accordingly 311060750 Ross Lorente 55MNon Hospitalized Amputation Carpenters 1. 01001 Serious43000001 B03/05/200903/10/2009I 270 270 0 08/06/2009 W-Empr Withdrew 2. 02001 Serious43000001 A03/05/200903/10/2009I 2700 18000 0 A-Amendment
  • Who knew rock concerts are loud? Sometimes really loud? Maryellen and Kevin Burns filed a lawsuit against rockers Whitesnake after a 2003 concert. The couple argued the show caused permanent hearing loss. The show, held at Boston's Orpheum Theatre, was part of the Mmmm ... Nice Package Tour, featuring Scorpions and Dokken . The venue and promoter were also named in the lawsuit. The suit argues that the couple was asked to move to seats closer to the stage. A piece of staging was blocking the view from their original seats. Once moved closer, the couple found themselves next to a large speaker. According to a hearing loss expert, the speakers had "the potential to blast music at a volume anywhere from 2 to 22 times what is considered 'acceptable exposure' to the human ear." As a result, Maryellen Burns claimed long-term hearing loss. In the end, a judge sided with the Burns and the couple was awarded $40,000 in damages. The dangers of a rock concert -- Eight years ago, a middle-age mom sued Motley Crue for loss of hearing Vittoria Hohman barely can. The former real estate agent from St. Petersburg, Fla., says she has been hard of hearing since December 1985, when she took her daughter, Kellie, then 14, to a Mötley Crüe concert. The outing was designed to be a mother-daughter bonding experience. Hohman even bought front-row seats. The two sat less than 10 feet from the stage — right next to a wall of speakers It was the first and last rock concert Hohman ever attended, she says, and Tommy Lee's pounding drumbeats and Mick Mars' guitar were the last sounds she ever heard properly. By the time she left St. Petersburg's Bayfront Center, Hohman claims, she had lost all the hearing in one ear and partial hearing in the other. Kellie suffered damage as well, though only temporarily. Hohman filed suit against Mötley Crüe and the concert promoter, Beach Club Promotions, on June 17, 1987. Two years later, the group's attorneys confirm, the case was settled out of court by mutual agreement. The band's insurance company forked over $30,000. But as Hohman, 60, sees it, the money wasn't enough. ''It ruined me,'' she says of the concert. ''It caused me a lot of pain.'' She claims she was forced to give up her job selling real estate, since she couldn't hear her clients. ''If someone on the phone asked me if the house had a pool, I would hear, 'Does the house have an pool?' I had to leave my career. And I have been forced to do jobs that I didn't care to do. Manual jobs.'' W hen he had to take his 12-year-old to a concert by the group Smashing Pumpkins, Peter Jeffery planned to wait in a "parent's room." But a warm-up act commandeered the room, so Jeffery, a leading scholar of Gregorian chant, inserted a pair of earplugs, joined his son in the concert hall, and stayed to the end. Big mistake. After the concert, Jeffery felt dizzy and his left ear ached; both symptoms lasted until morning. The next day, his left ear rang loudly and incessantly. The ringing turned out to be tinnitus caused by the decibel overload, and his doctor said it would never go away. According to press reports, the Smashing Pumpkins concert reached loudness levels of 125 decibels, enough to cause permanent hearing loss in a fairly short time. On their own, many fans also crank up their Walkmans and car stereos to ear-splitting levels. With that kind of exposure, plenty of Smashing Pumpkins fans will need hearing aids by the time they reach Jeffery's age. Many won't have to wait: at least 15% of American teenagers have permanently lost some hearing. That's about the same percentage you would find among people between 45 and 65. http://www.bsherman.net/hearingloss.htm
  • http:// www.listzblog.com/top_ten_deadly_fires_history_list.html
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2003_E2_nightclub_stampede On November 25, 2009, Kyles and Hollins were found guilty of indirect criminal contempt for violating the previous orders to close the entire second floor of the club and were sentenced to two years in prison
  • http:// cincinnati.com/blogs/whoconcert / photo of the Love Parade
  • Shiftwork Practices 2007 Aguirre, A. and Moore-Ede, A. Circadian Information LP, Stoneham, MA www.circadian.com Work-schedule characteristics and reported musculoskeletal disorders of registered nurse. Scand J Work Environ Health. 2002 Dec; 28(6): 394-401. The relationship between nurse work schedules, sleep duration, and drowsy driving. SLEEP. 2007 30 (12): 1801-1807. Work schedule, needle use, and needlestick injuries among registered nurses. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2007 28:156-164. Chemical Safety Board - BP Texas City Explosion: March, 2005 Develop a Fatigue Management Plan http://www.csb.gov/completed_investigations/docs/CSBFinalReportBP.pdf pages 293-299 http://www.safetypartnership.blogspot.com/
  • Special Effects Technician Is Burned in Explosion Paramount Pictures On June 6, 2005, Employee #1, a Paramount Pictures special effects technician, sustained second- and third-degree burns over more than 50 percent of his body when special effects pyrotechnics exploded unexpectedly while he was in proximity. He was stabilized at the scene by on-site emergency medical personnel, and then airlifted to Henry Mayo Newhall Memorial Hospital. He was later transferred to Torrance Memorial Medical Center in extremely critical condition. Employee #1 was hospitalized for four months and underwent numerous surgeries and skin grafts. The investigation found that the pyrotechnic device detonated as a result of a short circuit. Photo is from another accident.
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=djVBzrucNLY is a video of the accident from the trial Many stories are on the accident.
  • From Lights! Camera! Action! Using infants and children as performers in motion picture films is often unavoidable, but it is essential to ensure that the children are not exploited or exposed to unsafe conditions. Most states have child labor laws which are intended to protect child performers and models. In New York State, for example, according to Section 35 of the Arts and Cultural Law, a child under the age of 16 must be under the direction, control or supervision of the Department of Education, and a permit obtained specifying the details and time of the child's participation. This permit is obtained from the mayor or chief executive officer of the city where the filming will take place. Permits will not be issued for anything that would be harmful to the child's welfare, development or proper education, and the child can only perform what is described in the permit. The following are some concerns and requirements for child performers: 1. Infants and children are much more easily fatigued than adults. Late hours, frequent retakes, and excessive exertion are some examples of situations to be avoided or minimized. 2. There is growing concern about the effects of bright camera lighting on the eyes of children, particularly infants. At present, no standards exist but good practice would involve minimizing the amount of time children spend under bright lights. 3. Children are not permitted to perform hazardous stunts or be in the area where they are being performed. The New York State regulations, for example, state that it is "unlawful to employ a child ... In any practice that is dangerous to life or limb." This law does make provision for a Child Performer Permit for children riding a bicycle or horse. In these instances, the child is under the supervision of the State Department of Education. Of course, any child performing such an activity should have appropriate training, and they should not be permitted to participate in hazardous stunts. For example, the two Vietnamese children killed during the 1982 filming of "The Twilight Zone: A Movie" should never have been involved in scenes involving pyrotechnics. 4. Young children also should not participate in scenes which, in the opinion of a psychiatrist, would be psychologically traumatic. An example might be a young child witnessing graphic violence. 5. State laws also require that the production company hire teachers for children who are missing school. The SAG and AFTRA contracts specify requirements for number of school hours and working hours, and other relevant conditions. California also requires that teachers have training as welfare workers.
  • Hollingsworth, 27, of Palm Beach Gardens, who had worked for the center since April, 2007, fell 25 feet as he installed lights at the 300-seat Marshall E. Rinker Sr. Playhouse, the side theater to the main Alexander W. Dreyfoos Jr. Concert Hall. Originally, OSHA had proposed fining Kravis $4,900: $7,000, the maximum for a "substantial probability of death or serious physical harm," reduced by 20 percent deduction for Kravis being a smaller company and 10 percent for it not having had an incident in three years. "Rather than choose to appeal the citation, Wald said today, Kravis "agreed not to contest the serious citation and agreed to abate the violation by requiring workers to use power lifts to reach lighting areas rather than allow workers to use catwalks. OSHA agreed to apply a 25 percent penalty reduction resulting in a final penalty of $3,675." http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/osha-head-fines-too-small-to-protect-entertainment-722933.html
  • Several. Fall from car. Rigging failure. Hoist failure.
  • Entertainment safety 12 29 10

    1. 1. That’s not Entertainment Entertainment Industry Safety Draft 12 29 2010
    2. 2. &quot;Holy (blank). Holy (blank). This is terrifying.&quot; <ul><li>Declan Sullivan’s tweet from on top the aerial lift. </li></ul><ul><li>Winds were 51 mph. </li></ul><ul><li>Wind alert last two days. </li></ul><ul><li>What was the safe wind </li></ul><ul><li>for this aerial lift? </li></ul><ul><li>Declan, age 20, </li></ul><ul><li>was slated to go off to </li></ul><ul><li>study in China next </li></ul><ul><li>semester. </li></ul>A day of employee aerial lift training is industry practice. See www.ipaf.org
    3. 3. 'Spider-Man' stunt goes awry; is show in peril? <ul><li>Revenues lost due to accident are over million. </li></ul><ul><li>Back surgeries are thousands of dollars. </li></ul><ul><li>CBS said the harness broke on 12-23-10. </li></ul><ul><li>An ANSI Z359 harness $200. </li></ul><ul><li>Do the math. </li></ul><ul><li>$200 or a whole cast out of work with millions lost. </li></ul><ul><li>Most accidents are preventable and good cases for business viability. </li></ul>Stuntman Christopher Tierney who fell over 20 feet is undergoing back surgery in the 12-21-10 fall.
    4. 4. Falls <ul><li>Vicente Rodriguez died on May 20, 2009, five days after his 20th birthday, at the MGM Grand's Hollywood Theater. </li></ul><ul><li>He was working as a high rigger, a job he was not trained to do, when he fell 40 feet to his death </li></ul>
    5. 5. The Effect on Families <ul><li>“ Vicente Enrique Rodriguez, it was an honor to be your mother, you were the very best of both of us, and what a human being should be.” </li></ul><ul><li>Marychris Rodiguez </li></ul>
    6. 6. These Deaths Were Preventable <ul><li>These were not isolated cases. </li></ul><ul><li>There were 23 deaths and 103 injuries for a total of 126 in 118 incidents from 2000-2010. This included three double, one triple and one quadruple incident. </li></ul><ul><li>Vicente Rodiguez’s death was one of 42 falls that OSHA can document from 2000-2010. </li></ul><ul><li>Workers have a right to a safe workplace. </li></ul><ul><li>In the entertainment industry these are the FIVE largest risks among many: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Falls </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rigging Failure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Saws </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Hearing loss </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fire </li></ul></ul><ul><li>All of these are preventable </li></ul>
    7. 7. Accident Causation Factors <ul><li>42 falls: includes 8 falls from ladder, 4 falls from catwalk, </li></ul><ul><li>2 scaffolds, 2 aerial lifts </li></ul><ul><li>35 struck by objects include 14 saw blades, 13 falling objects </li></ul><ul><li>(8 vehicle loads), 3 struck by flying object </li></ul><ul><li>10 collapses: 5 aerial lifts, 2 forklifts, 2 ladders, 1 scaffold </li></ul><ul><li>7 burns: 4 pyrotechnics. 2 arc blasts, 1 gunpowder </li></ul><ul><li>6 caught in/between </li></ul><ul><li>4 pyrotechnic explosions </li></ul><ul><li>16 others include 4 inhalation of CO, 3 hearing loss, 2 pedestrian struck by vehicle, 2 motor vehicle incidents </li></ul><ul><li>But there is more….trampling, etc. </li></ul>
    8. 8. Injury Prevention Basics <ul><li>Management Leadership </li></ul><ul><li>Employee Participation </li></ul><ul><li>Hazard Prevention and Control </li></ul><ul><li>Education and Training </li></ul><ul><li>Program Evaluation and Improvement </li></ul><ul><li>Communication and coordination on multi-employer sites </li></ul><ul><li>These principles are adopted and recognized by… </li></ul><ul><ul><li>2100 VPP Companies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1600 SHARPs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1926.20, 1926.21 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1910.119 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>ANSI Z9.10 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>OHSAS 18001 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>States AR, CA, LA, HI, MN, MT NV, NH, NY, OR, WA </li></ul></ul>
    9. 9. Falls <ul><li>Any company with personnel who work at heights must have a fall protection plan to be in compliance with the new ANSI Z359.2 standard. </li></ul><ul><li>A written Personal Protective Equipment hazard assessment is required under OSHA 1910.132. </li></ul><ul><li>Employees must know </li></ul><ul><li>the use, inspections, </li></ul><ul><li>and limitation of fall </li></ul><ul><li>arrest equipment. </li></ul>
    10. 10. Rigging <ul><li>October 3, 2006 </li></ul><ul><li>Trying to lift 4,700 pounds support stand </li></ul><ul><li>Sling broke </li></ul><ul><li>Employee received multiple fracture of both legs and feet. </li></ul>Must know total weight including rigging. What is the weakest component? Training is a must.
    11. 11. Thumb Amputation <ul><li>January 18, 2009 </li></ul><ul><li>The table saw had been routinely used without its guard assembly. </li></ul><ul><li>His left thumb got in the path of the running blade </li></ul><ul><li>(10&quot; carbide-tip, 50-tooth ripping blade) and amputated his thumb tip. </li></ul><ul><li>Every operator of the saw </li></ul><ul><li>should know how to </li></ul><ul><li>recognize the required guards. </li></ul><ul><li>This is the cause of most </li></ul><ul><li>amputations in the </li></ul><ul><li>Entertainment Industry. </li></ul>
    12. 12. Cost of Hearing Loss <ul><li>“ I don't find picking on someone who is deaf to be funny, or entertaining. But then again this is coming from someone who is almost completely deaf in one of my ears. A lot of times I don't hear all of the conversation, or I miss the punch line to a joke, and a lot of times I'm too embarrassed to let anyone know that this is happening. I don't want to be treated different, or looked down upon.” </li></ul><ul><li>One Candlebox concert </li></ul><ul><li>Single concert deafness has happened </li></ul><ul><li>numerous times. </li></ul><ul><li>It is not just “put in ear plugs” </li></ul><ul><li>Conduct noise monitoring and establish an </li></ul><ul><li>effective hearing conservation program with </li></ul><ul><li>employee training. </li></ul>
    13. 13. Fire <ul><li>February 20, 2003 </li></ul><ul><li>The club burned to the ground in six minutes.  </li></ul><ul><li>100 people were killed </li></ul><ul><li>230 were injured </li></ul><ul><li>132 made it out </li></ul><ul><li>unharmed. </li></ul>The lessons from the Iroquois Theater Fire, Coconut Grove, Kentucky Supper are all past examples of large loss fires.
    14. 14. Egress <ul><li>E2 – 21 died in 2003 in a trampling accident </li></ul><ul><li>On November 25, 2009, two owners of the nightclub were found guilty of indirect criminal contempt for violating the previous orders to close the entire second floor of the club and were sentenced to two years in prison </li></ul>The doors did not swing out in path of exit travel was one many issues. Example of this at another venue is shown
    15. 15. Egress <ul><li>2010 - 21 died, 500 injured at Germany’s Love Parade fest. </li></ul><ul><li>1979 - 11 concert goers were killed and scores were injured to see The Who. </li></ul><ul><li>1998  - 8 people were killed in a stampede by fans rushing the stage Friday night at an outdoor Pearl Jam. </li></ul><ul><li>Training in crowd management is essential for staff and planning an event. </li></ul>http:// www.osha.gov/OshDoc/data_General_Facts/Crowd_Control.html Is OSHA’s guidelines for crowd controls. The principles are applicable in Entertainment.
    16. 16. Fatigue <ul><li>Some production crews have worked 20+days in a row of 12+hour days. </li></ul><ul><li>If workers are too tired to remember their training, that is when bad things happen. </li></ul><ul><li>Fatigue Management Plan. </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.csb.gov/completed_investigations/docs/CSBFinalReportBP.pdf pages 293-299 </li></ul><ul><li>Fatigue a causal or contributing factor. </li></ul><ul><li>Three Mile Island, </li></ul><ul><li>Chernoble and </li></ul><ul><li>Exxon Valdez. </li></ul><ul><li>Challenger Disaster. </li></ul><ul><li>The Baker Commission investigating the BP Texas City disaster in the US recommended to BP the development of a Fatigue Management Plan </li></ul>
    17. 17. Electrical and Arc Flash <ul><li>August 28, 2001 </li></ul><ul><li>Employee was performing repairs inside an electrical panel. </li></ul><ul><li>He was using an &quot;easy-out,&quot; a device for extracting broken screws, to remove a screw that had become stuck while threaded into a bus bar. Its head had sheared off. </li></ul><ul><li>Drilled into the remaining portion of the screw with a portable electric drill. </li></ul><ul><li>Just as he felt the drill bit punch through the back of the screw, a large flash ensued. </li></ul><ul><li>He was treated for second and </li></ul><ul><li>third-degree burns. </li></ul>NFPA 70E and OSHA 1910.333-399 have specific rules on working on live parts over 50 volts. Training, PPE, and safe procedures are required.
    18. 18. Special Effects Technician Is Burned in Explosion <ul><li>June 6, 2005 </li></ul><ul><li>Special effects technician </li></ul><ul><li>Second and third-degree burns over more than 50 percent of his body. </li></ul><ul><li>Pyrotechnics exploded unexpectedly while he was in proximity. </li></ul><ul><li>Employee was hospitalized for four months and underwent numerous surgeries and skin grafts. </li></ul><ul><li>The investigation found that the </li></ul><ul><li>pyrotechnic device detonated as a </li></ul><ul><li>result of a short circuit. </li></ul>PPE, training, programs, and electrical safety are necessary.
    19. 19. Special Effects <ul><li>The most dangerous types of special effects involve the use of fire, pyrotechnics, and firearms. </li></ul><ul><li>Many of these special effects scenes are also stunts since actors are involved. </li></ul><ul><li>The death of Vic Morrow,  Renee Chen (age 6), My-ca Dinh Le (age 7) during the 1982 filming of &quot;The Twilight Zone: a Movie&quot; involved a special effects explosion which caused the helicopter to crash onto the actors. </li></ul><ul><li>Other types of hazardous fire and pyrotechnics special effects include car explosions, simulated bullet hits, burning buildings, flames, flash pots, etc. </li></ul>
    20. 20. Children are not to be exploited or exposed to unsafe conditions. <ul><li>States have child labor laws which are intended to protect child performers and models. </li></ul><ul><li>Infants and children are much more easily fatigued than adults. Late hours, frequent retakes, and excessive exertion are some examples of situations to be avoided or minimized. </li></ul><ul><li>The effects of bright camera lighting on the eyes of children, particularly infants is a concern. Minimize the amount of time children spend under bright lights. </li></ul><ul><li>Young children also should not participate in scenes which, in the opinion of a psychiatrist, would be psychologically traumatic. An example might be a young child witnessing graphic violence. </li></ul><ul><li>Children are not permitted to perform hazardous stunts or be in the area where they are being performed. </li></ul><ul><li>For example, the two children killed during the 1982 filming of &quot;The Twilight Zone: A Movie&quot; should never have been involved in scenes involving pyrotechnics. </li></ul><ul><li>State laws also require that the production company hire teachers for children who are missing school. The SAG and AFTRA contracts specify requirements for number of school hours and working hours, and other relevant conditions. California also requires that teachers have training as welfare workers. </li></ul><ul><li>OSHA has investigated several accidents with children (as young as four) who died in a workplace. </li></ul>
    21. 21. OSHA <ul><li>&quot;We've seen several examples of employers in the entertainment industry that have not provided precautions adequate to protect workers. And we've seen fatalities as a result of that,&quot; Assistant Labor Secretary and OSHA Director David Michaels said Thursday during a conference call with reporters, the Orlando Sentinel reported. </li></ul><ul><li>&quot;There's a tremendous amount of risky work in these facilities and safety is often not considered the highest priority in these cases,&quot; Michaels said. </li></ul><ul><li>While most people think of offshore oil rigs, mines and logging as dangerous, the entertainment industry can be as well, as evidenced by the Dec. 3 death at Kravis of Fenton &quot;Andy&quot; Hollingsworth as well as a fatal attack by a killer whale on a Sea World and three employee deaths last year at Walt Disney World, OSHA spokesman Michael Wald said this week. </li></ul>
    22. 22. Blink – What Could Go Wrong? Auto hoisted over a crowd during a concert
    23. 23. Resources <ul><li>artscraftstheatersafety.org </li></ul><ul><li>http:// www.hse.gov.uk/entertainment/information.htm </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.uic.edu/sph/glakes/harts1/HARTS_library/ it has several good links, checklist, safety procedures, and much more </li></ul><ul><li>The Artist's Complete Health and Safety Guide: Third Edition by Monona Rossol (Nov 1, 2001) </li></ul><ul><li>International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE) </li></ul><ul><li>Every state has free consultation available to small employers. </li></ul><ul><li>And…..(next slide) </li></ul>
    24. 24. History Repeats <ul><li>Lights! Camera! Action! was a Health and Safety Manual for the Motion Picture and Television Production produced by the Center for Safety in the Arts by Dr. Michael McCann, Ph.D., C.I.H. </li></ul><ul><li>The txt book is at  http://www.uic.edu/sph/glakes/harts1/HARTS_library/filmall.txt   </li></ul><ul><li>This is a must read for anyone in the entertainment field. Many of the hazards identified in the 1991 book reoccur today. Many more examples and accidents are in the book. </li></ul>
    25. 25. Further <ul><li>This was prepared as a collaborative effort several friends as a preliminary aid for anyone in the Entertainment field. </li></ul><ul><li>These are just some the issues. A comprehensive job hazard analysis should be conducted for any task where someone can get hurt. </li></ul><ul><li>This is not an official OSHA publication. Those will be on the OSHA.gov website. </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] is my email if you see any errors </li></ul><ul><li>312-353-5977 </li></ul><ul><li>I want to thank Dr. McCann, M.R., Matt S. Marychris R., Shumaine G., Lisa S., and Janet S. for all their assistance in answering questions and providing insight to the many hazards in this sector. </li></ul>

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