Conveyor Safety

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Conveyor Safety

  1. 1. CONVEYOR & CRUSHER SAFETY NCMAQD Steve Franklin
  2. 2. 56.14107(a <ul><li>Guarding of Moving Machine Parts </li></ul><ul><li>2,960 </li></ul><ul><li>13.7% </li></ul>
  3. 3. Guards
  4. 5. NONMETAL MINE FATALITY <ul><li>On March 18, 1999, a 56-year-old superintendent with 4 weeks mining experience was fatally injured at a sand and gravel operation. The victim was using a metal bar to clean mud off of a return roller underneath a conveyor belt when he was caught and drawn into the pinch point. </li></ul>
  5. 6. Best Practices <ul><li>Maintenance should not be performed unless the power is off and machinery components are blocked against hazardous motion. </li></ul><ul><li>Moving machine parts should be guarded to protect persons from contact that could cause injury. </li></ul><ul><li>Mine operators should take measures to ensure all personnel are trained in safe work procedure </li></ul>
  6. 7. NONMETAL MINE FATALITY <ul><li>On August 9, 1999, a 25-year-old laborer with 4 weeks mining experience was fatally injured at a sand and gravel operation. The victim was using a hoe to clean material underneath an operating conveyor belt when he was caught and drawn into the pinch point at a return roller. </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>
  7. 8. Best Practices <ul><li>Maintenance should not be performed unless the power is off and machinery components are blocked against hazardous motion. </li></ul><ul><li>Moving machine parts should be guarded to protect persons from contact that could cause injury. </li></ul><ul><li>Mine operators should take measures to assure all personnel are trained in safe work procedures. </li></ul>
  8. 10. Continued
  9. 11. Continued
  10. 12. 56.14112(b <ul><li>Guard Construction </li></ul><ul><li>622 </li></ul><ul><li>2.9% </li></ul>
  11. 13. NONMETAL MINE FATALITY <ul><li>On April 28, 1998, a 36-year old plant operator was fatally injured at an open pit limestone mine. The victim climbed a conveyor structure and became caught in a pinch point while attempting to clean a moving conveyor belt with a shovel. The victim's arm was severed and he fell 9 feet to the ground. </li></ul>
  12. 14. Best Practices <ul><li>Conveyors should be de-energized and blocked against motion before work is performed on them. </li></ul><ul><li>Guards around moving machine parts should cover all areas which miners can contact inadvertently. </li></ul><ul><li>Substantially constructed work platforms should be provided at all worksites. </li></ul><ul><li>Where there is a danger of falling, persons should wear safety belts and lines. </li></ul>
  13. 15. Continued
  14. 16. Continued
  15. 17. Continued
  16. 18. Paperwork & Training
  17. 19. Walkway
  18. 21. Accidents In a recent six year period, 21 miners died in conveyor-belt accidents. The leading cause of these accidents was trying to remove material sticking to a roller or pulley while the belt was running
  19. 22. Consider the following: <ul><li>In these fatal accidents, belt speeds were typically in the range of 300 to 500 feet per minute (fpm). This means the belt was moving from 5 to over 8 feet per second. </li></ul><ul><li>For the average person, the time needed to react to an unexpected sensation is about one second. </li></ul>
  20. 23. FACTS <ul><li>Putting these facts together shows why working near a running conveyor belt is so dangerous. Even at 300 fpm, in that one second that the average person needs to react, the belt moves over the pulleys and rollers a distance of 5 feet. That's far enough to draw your tool, your loose clothing, gloved or bare hand and arm, into a pinch point before you can react. </li></ul>
  21. 24. Take these tips to work with you: <ul><li>Don't take chances around a conveyor belt. </li></ul><ul><li>Don't perform work that will expose you to a pinch point, like clearing caked material from a roller, while a belt is in operation. </li></ul><ul><li>Only work on a conveyor that is locked and tagged out. </li></ul><ul><li>If you are working near a stopped belt, and a start-up warning is given, stop what you're doing and get clear! </li></ul>
  22. 25. Tips <ul><li>Never cross a moving belt. </li></ul><ul><li>Always cross at a bridge or designated crossing point. </li></ul>
  23. 26. FACTS An average of forty miners are injured each year by material falling from belt conveyors. Although these injuries are generally not serious, almost half result in lost work time. Over a five-year period, the average number of lost-work days per injury was 12 at metal and nonmetal mines and 23 at coal mines.
  24. 27. Skirt Boards <ul><li>The use of skirt boards can limit the amount of material that falls from conveyors and exposes miners to injuries. The cost can be optimized by placing the skirt boards at &quot;high-risk&quot; areas along the belt line, where these type of accidents are more likely to occur. </li></ul>
  25. 28. To reduce such accidents, mine operators should do the following: <ul><li>1) Install skirt boards on conveyors at locations that have a higher likelihood of material falling off the belt, or a higher chance for miners to be exposed to this hazard, such as: </li></ul><ul><li>At loading and transfer areas it is recommended that the skirt boards be at least 2-1/2 times longer than the belt is wide, to allow the material to ‘settle down'; </li></ul>
  26. 29. To reduce accidents <ul><li>At areas that have unusual features, such as magnets, crushers, and grizzlies; </li></ul><ul><li>At places where persons regularly travel along or cross under the belt; and </li></ul><ul><li>At areas where maintenance, clean-up, or inspection activities are frequently performed. </li></ul>
  27. 30. 2) At your periodic safety meetings, emphasize the following : <ul><li>In the ‘high-risk' areas mentioned above, miners need to be aware of the potential for falling material while doing clean-up, maintenance, or inspection work. </li></ul><ul><li>Under certain operating conditions, such as when a belt is not fully loaded, material may be more likely to bounce or fall off a belt. </li></ul>
  28. 31. safety meetings <ul><li>When traveling along conveyors (even in a vehicle), miners should keep as far away from the conveyor as possible, without exposing themselves to other hazards. </li></ul><ul><li>Even small material can cause injury if it falls from a height or from a fast moving belt. </li></ul>
  29. 32. NONMETAL MINE FATALITY On April 4, 2006, a 23-year-old laborer, with one month mining experience, was fatally injured at a sand and gravel operation. The victim had entered the area under the crusher and traveled near the back side of the discharge conveyor tail pulley. His clothing became entangled in the rotating tail pulley.
  30. 33. Best Practices <ul><li>Establish policies that ensure employees are trained on required procedures to safely remove spillage near moving conveyor belts. </li></ul><ul><li>Establish policies that ensure employees are trained on required procedures to safely remove spillage near moving conveyor belts. </li></ul><ul><li>Before assigning miners to clean up spillage, have them identify hazards and demonstrate how they would safely complete the tasks. </li></ul>
  31. 34. Best Practices <ul><li>Stop, Look, Analyze, Manage ( SLAM ) </li></ul><ul><li>Ensure that conveyor belts are deenergized and blocked against motion before positioning yourself near the drive, head, tail, and take-up pulleys. </li></ul>
  32. 35. NONMETAL MINE FATALITY <ul><li>On May 3, 2006, a 19-year-old laborer, with 4 weeks mining experience, was fatally injured at a sand and gravel operation. The victim was underneath a feeder conveyor belt and was adjusting it when he became entangled between the belt and the return idler. </li></ul>
  33. 36. Best Practices <ul><li>Ensure that miners are properly task trained in procedures to safely adjust conveyor belts that are in operation. A competent person should closely observe the miner while he performs the task to ensure they are protected from hazardous motion of the conveyor. </li></ul><ul><li>Before assigning miners to adjust belts, have them identify hazards and demonstrate how they would safely complete the task. Stop, Look, Analyze, Manage ( SLAM ). </li></ul>
  34. 37. Best Practices <ul><li>Keep all guards securely in place except when testing or making adjustments. </li></ul><ul><li>Install local stop switches at all conveyor locations and ensure start up warning alarms are operational where visual observation of the entire conveyor is not possible from the start up control. </li></ul>
  35. 38. NONMETAL MINE FATALITY <ul><li>On September 28, 2004, a 64-year-old plant operator, with 17 years mining experience, was fatally injured at a sand and gravel operation. He was using a water hose to clean spillage under a conveyor. Apparently, a large rock fell from a conveyor located overhead and struck him, resulting in fatal injuries . </li></ul>
  36. 39. Best Practices <ul><li>Conduct a Risk Assessment evaluating all tasks and identifying potential hazards before performing work. </li></ul><ul><li>Never walk under or perform work near moving conveyor belts where there is a danger of being stuck from falling material. </li></ul><ul><li>Ensure that guards, shields, or other devices are installed to protect persons from hazards of falling material near conveyors, screens, or crushers. </li></ul>
  37. 40. NONMETAL MINE FATALITY <ul><li>On January 25, 2005, a 49-year-old quarry operator, with 14 years mining experience, was fatally injured at a cement operation. The victim was cleaning loose material and pumping water from the primary crusher conveyor belt basement. He contacted an unguarded return idler that was about four feet above the ground and was trapped between the conveyor belt and the return idler. </li></ul>
  38. 41. Best Practices <ul><li>Examine work areas to identify all possible hazards and take all precautions to safely perform the task before the work begins. </li></ul><ul><li>Ensure that moving machine parts are guarded to protect persons. </li></ul><ul><li>Ensure that miners are prohibited from traveling through areas or performing work where they are exposed to moving machine parts that can cause injury. </li></ul><ul><li> </li></ul>
  39. 42. Man vs. Machine Man lost.

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