Most Frequently Cited OSHAConstruction StandardsFederal OSHA – FY 2012John A NewquistFacebookLinked InTwitterSlideshare
#1 1926.501 (b)(13)• Most the falls arethose with no fallarrest• Workers can slip onshingle or felt to startslipping• Most...
Part 1 Directive• Effective June 16, 2011• OSHA has issued a directive rescinding the Interim Fall ProtectionCompliance Gu...
What is Residential?• The end-use is to havepeople live in as theirhome, i.e., adwelling/apartmentAND• The structure being...
Residential? NO! (most instances)• Churches• Nursing Homes• Banks• HotelsNursing HomesHotelsBanks
Fall Protection Plan• 1926.502(k)• See Appendix E inOSHA Subpart M• ANSI Z359.2 –MinimumRequirements for aComprehensiveMan...
Fall Protection Program• Written Plan showing fall arrest is notfeasible• Plan must be specific to the site it is usedon• ...
#2 1926.503(a)(1)• No fall protectiontraining program• This is a programrequirement to trainworkers in thehazards of falls...
#3 1926.501(b)(1)• Open-sided floorsover six feet withoutfall protection.• No guardrails on thiscommercial building.• Foun...
#4 1926.1053(b)(1)• Ladder not extendingover the edge 3 feet
#5 1926.102(a)(1)• 1926.102(a)(1) –eye/face protection• Grinding, Chemicals,Sparks, and any otherflying object hazard
#6 1926.100(a)• No Hard Hats• When working aroundthe bucket of a backhoe, hard hats shouldbe worn.
#7 1926.501(b)(10)• Fall protection not usedon low sloped roofs• Guardrails and Fall arrestcan be put on roofs.• 1926.501(...
#8 1926.451 (g)(1)• No guard rails onscaffolds.• Often ends are notprotected.• The cross bracingmay serve as ONE ofthe rai...
#9 1926.20(b)(2)• No inspection ofworksite by acompetent person• Workers are neverto allowed to ridethe forks of a roughte...
#10 1926.453(b)(2)(v)• No Fall Protection inaerial lifts.• Worker in photo iswearing a full bodyharness for fall arrest.• ...
Develop Safety Rules• Follow Aerial Lift Manufacturer’sinstructions. Use ANSI A92 standards onaerial lifts if you cannot g...
Aerial Lift Training• Hands on training isnecessary. An aerial liftis not a car.• The worker should beable to demonstrate ...
Aerial Lift Training• The worker must knowwhere to attach thesnaphook for any aeriallift that has an OSHArated anchorage.•...
Aerial Lift Training• National Training guidelines• International Powered Access Federation(IPAF) www.ipaf.org• "Spot the ...
Bubbling Under the Top Ten• 1926.652(a)(1) – cave-inprotection• 1926.451(e)(1) – Unsafescaffold access• 1926.501(b)(11) – ...
Thanks• To Kenny for all his help.• My email is johnanewquist@gmail.com• www.buildsafe.org is a nonprofit where Iteach man...
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Construction most freq cited fy12 national

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  • FY 2012 Penalty $9.9M, 2695 total citations Victim and another employee were staging bundles of shingles on the second story roof of the newly constructed house. Both employees were on the east side of the house near the valley when the victim slipped on ice or frost on the roof and fell 21 feet to the ground below. The victim was transported to the hospital where he died the next day. Employee was installing roofing material on existing building when employee fell from roof.
  • Why did OSHA issue Instruction STD 3.1 “Interim Fall Protection Compliance Guidelines for Residential Construction” in 1995? Once the final rule for Subpart M was published, representatives from the residential construction industry, including the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) and the National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA), expressed ongoing concerns about complying with 1926.501(b)(13). For example, industry representatives were concerned about the feasibility of establishing proper anchor points on wood-framed structures. In response to their concerns and to give OSHA time to revisit some feasibility issues, the Agency issued Directive STD 3.1. The directive allowed employers doing specified residential construction activities to comply with the requirements of Subpart M by implementing the alternative fall protection and work procedures prescribed in the directive. The alternative procedures could be used without a prior showing of infeasibility or greater hazard and without a written fall protection plan. The Agency did not intend STD 3.1 to be a permanent policy. Why did OSHA reissue STD 3.1 as STD 3-0.1A in 1998? OSHA issued STD 3-0.1A (later redesignated as STD 03-00-001) as a plain language replacement for STD 3.1. In STD 03-00-001, the Agency made some changes to the original interim guidance to clarify the scope of the directive and the Agency’s enforcement policy with respect to fall protection requirements for the specific construction activities covered by the directive. In STD 03-00-001, OSHA indicated that it intended to reevaluate the interim policy after soliciting additional public comment. Why did OSHA issue an Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPR) for Subpart M in 1999? OSHA issued an ANPR for Subpart M in 1999 in part to obtain information from the public that it could use to evaluate the effectiveness of and need for STD 03-00-001. In the ANPR, the Agency noted that there had been progress in the types and capability of commercially available fall protection equipment since 1926.501(b)(13) was promulgated in 1994. OSHA also stated in the ANPR that it intended to rescind STD 03-00-001 unless persuasive evidence was submitted showing that it is infeasible or presents significant safety hazards for most residential construction employers to comply with 1926.501(b)(13). Did OSHA rely on sources of information in addition to the comments received in response to the ANPR in evaluating whether to continue the interim enforcement policy contained in STD 03-00-001 ? Yes. A Residential Fall Protection Work Group within OSHA’s Advisory Committee on Construction Safety and Health (ACCSH) has reported to ACCSH on a number of presentations they have seen from home builders and fall protection equipment manufacturers describing new ways of providing safe and effective fall protection in residential construction. ACCSH has recommended rescission of STD 03-00-001 on two separate occasions – first in 2000 and again in 2008. Also in 2008, both the Occupational Safety and Health State Plan Association (OSHSPA) and the NAHB submitted letters to OSHA advocating for withdrawal of STD 03-00-001. The NRCA has continued to oppose rescission of STD 03-00-001 with respect to roofing work, but a representative of that organization conceded at an ACCSH meeting in December 2009 that nowadays it is “very tough” to establish that conventional fall protection is infeasible or creates a greater hazard.
  • From the fact sheet The new directive interprets “residential construction” as construction work that satisfies both of the following elements:  The end-use of the structure being built must be as a home, i.e., a dwelling.  The structure being built must be constructed using traditional wood frame construction materials and methods. The limited use of structural steel in a predominantly wood-framed home, such as a steel I-beam to help support wood framing, does not disqualify a structure from being considered residential construction. From OSHA Fact Sheet Why are only “dwellings” considered residential construction”? Limiting the scope of 1926.501(b)(13) to the construction of homes/dwellings comports with the plain meaning of the term “residential” in the text of that paragraph and is consistent with OSHA’s intent in promulgating that provision.
  • Employees working six (6) feet or more above lower levels must be protected by conventional fall protection methods listed in 1926.501(b)(13) ( i.e., guardrail systems, safety net systems, or personal fall arrest systems ) or alternative fall protection measures allowed by other provisions of 29 CFR 1926.501(b) for particular types of work.  An example of an alternative fall protection measure allowed under 1926.501(b) is the use of warning lines and safety monitoring systemsduring the performance of roofing work on lowsloped roofs. (4 in 12 pitch or less). (See 1926.501(b)(10)).  OSHA allows the use of an effective fall restraint system in lieu of a personal fall arrest system. To be effective, a fall restraint system must be rigged to prevent a worker from reaching a fall hazard and falling over the edge. A fall restraint system may consist of a full body harness or body belt that is connected to an anchor point at the center of a roof by a lanyard of a length that will not allow a worker to physically reach the edge of the roof.  When the employer can demonstrate that it is infeasible or creates a greater hazard to use required fall protection systems, a qualified person must develop a written site-specific fall protection plan in accordance with 1926.502(k) that, among other things, specifies the alternative fall protection methods that will be used to protect workers from falls.
  • There is a “Sample Fall Protection Plan” in Appendix E of Subpart M. Why did OSHA prepare this appendix? OSHA included Appendix E in Subpart M to show employers and employees what a compliant fall protection plan might look like. From OSHA Fact Sheet Can a standardized fall protection plan be developed and implemented for the construction of dwellings that are of the same basic structural design? Before using a fall protection plan at a particular worksite, the employer must first be able to demonstrate that it is infeasible or presents a greater hazard to use conventional fall protection methods at that site. Fall protection plans must be site-specific to comply with §1926.502(k). A written fall protection plan developed for repetitive use, e.g., for a particular style or model of home, will be considered site-specific with respect to a particular site only if it fully addresses all issues related to fall protection at that site. Therefore, a standardized plan will have to be reviewed, and revised as necessary, on a site by site basis.
  • Penalty $1.6M, 1019 total citations. 1926.503(a)(1) The employer shall provide a training program for each employee who might be exposed to fall hazards. The program shall enable each employee to recognize the hazards of falling and shall train each employee in the procedures to be followed in order to minimize these hazards.
  • Penalty $3.6M, 1000 total citations 1926.501(b)(1) "Unprotected sides and edges." Each employee on a walking/working surface (horizontal and vertical surface) with an unprotected side or edge which is 6 feet (1.8 m) or more above a lower level shall be protected from falling by the use of guardrail systems, safety net systems, or personal fall arrest systems.
  • Penalty 2.3M, 991 total violations 1926.1053(b)(1) When portable ladders are used for access to an upper landing surface, the ladder side rails shall extend at least 3 feet (.9 m) above the upper landing surface to which the ladder is used to gain access; or, when such an extension is not possible because of the ladder's length, then the ladder shall be secured at its top to a rigid support that will not deflect, and a grasping device, such as a grabrail, shall be provided to assist employees in mounting and dismounting the ladder. In no case shall the extension be such that ladder deflection under a load would, by itself, cause the ladder to slip off its support.
  • 774 violation total, $1.4M
  • Penalty $1.3M, 666 total violations 1926.100(a) Employees working in areas where there is a possible danger of head injury from impact, or from falling or flying objects, or from electrical shock and burns, shall be protected by protective helmets
  • 579 violations, $2.3M
  • Penalty 1.8M; 560 total violations 1926.451(g)(1) Each employee on a scaffold more than 10 feet (3.1 m) above a lower level shall be protected from falling to that lower level. Paragraphs (g)(1)(i) through (vii) of this section establish the types of fall protection to be provided to the employees on each type of scaffold. Paragraph (g)(2) of this section addresses fall protection for scaffold erectors and dismantlers. Note to paragraph (g)(1): The fall protection requirements for employees installing suspension scaffold support systems on floors, roofs, and other elevated surfaces are set forth in subpart M of this part.
  • 533 violation, $1.4M
  • Penalty 1.4M, 533 total violations 1926.453(b)(2)(v) A body belt shall be worn and a lanyard attached to the boom or basket when working from an aerial lift. Note to paragraph (b)(2)(v): As of January 1, 1998, subpart M of this part (1926.502(d)) provides that body belts are not acceptable as part of a personal fall arrest system. The use of a body belt in a tethering system or in a restraint system is acceptable and is regulated under 1926.502(e).
  • The International Powered Access Federation (IPAF) promotes the safe and effective use of powered access equipment worldwide in the widest sense -- through providing technical advice and information, through influencing and interpreting legislation and standards, through its safety initiatives and training programmes. It is a not-for-profit organisation owned by its members who include manufacturers, rental companies, contractors and users. If you are new to powered access, this website offers some starting points. You can refer to a simple industry document to understand what training and familiarisation is necessary. IPAF's technical guidance notes offer practical advice on using harnesses, assessing ground conditions and avoiding trapping. Visit the Film section to learn about the correct use of equipment and view the award-winning "Spot the Mistake" video. If you are looking for training -- the IPAF training programme for platform operators is certified by TÜV as conforming to ISO 18878. Successful trainees are awarded the PAL Card (Powered Access Licence) as proof of training. Find your nearest training centre using the locator.
  • Construction most freq cited fy12 national

    1. 1. Most Frequently Cited OSHAConstruction StandardsFederal OSHA – FY 2012John A NewquistFacebookLinked InTwitterSlideshare
    2. 2. #1 1926.501 (b)(13)• Most the falls arethose with no fallarrest• Workers can slip onshingle or felt to startslipping• Most are roof falls inresidentialNo fall arrest protectionused
    3. 3. Part 1 Directive• Effective June 16, 2011• OSHA has issued a directive rescinding the Interim Fall ProtectionCompliance Guidelines for Residential Construction (STD 03-00-001)• OSHA Extends Residential enforcement. Note: OSHAs policy doesNOT give builders a reprieve from new, more stringent fallprotection regulations.• First, the regulation hasnt changed; the old 1994 regulation is justbeing enforced. Second, there is no reprieve. Those requirementshave been in effect for over a year. Penalties are lower and morecompliance assistance is offered, but builders and roofers arerequired to comply with the new requirements.http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=NEW
    4. 4. What is Residential?• The end-use is to havepeople live in as theirhome, i.e., adwelling/apartmentAND• The structure being builtmust be constructedusing traditional woodframe constructionmaterials and methods.– Metal Studs– Masonry
    5. 5. Residential? NO! (most instances)• Churches• Nursing Homes• Banks• HotelsNursing HomesHotelsBanks
    6. 6. Fall Protection Plan• 1926.502(k)• See Appendix E inOSHA Subpart M• ANSI Z359.2 –MinimumRequirements for aComprehensiveManaged FallProtection Program
    7. 7. Fall Protection Program• Written Plan showing fall arrest is notfeasible• Plan must be specific to the site it is usedon• Can be used for repetitive use for aparticular style/model house if ALL issuesrelated to fall protection are addressed
    8. 8. #2 1926.503(a)(1)• No fall protectiontraining program• This is a programrequirement to trainworkers in thehazards of falls.• Many use job safetyanalysis to determinepotential hazardsfaced in construction.
    9. 9. #3 1926.501(b)(1)• Open-sided floorsover six feet withoutfall protection.• No guardrails on thiscommercial building.• Found quite a bit atelevator shafts, andstairwells also.
    10. 10. #4 1926.1053(b)(1)• Ladder not extendingover the edge 3 feet
    11. 11. #5 1926.102(a)(1)• 1926.102(a)(1) –eye/face protection• Grinding, Chemicals,Sparks, and any otherflying object hazard
    12. 12. #6 1926.100(a)• No Hard Hats• When working aroundthe bucket of a backhoe, hard hats shouldbe worn.
    13. 13. #7 1926.501(b)(10)• Fall protection not usedon low sloped roofs• Guardrails and Fall arrestcan be put on roofs.• 1926.501(b)(10) permitsthe use of warning linesand safety monitoringsystems during theperformance of roofingwork on low-sloped roofs(least desirable option).
    14. 14. #8 1926.451 (g)(1)• No guard rails onscaffolds.• Often ends are notprotected.• The cross bracingmay serve as ONE ofthe rails only if itmeets certain heightcriteria.
    15. 15. #9 1926.20(b)(2)• No inspection ofworksite by acompetent person• Workers are neverto allowed to ridethe forks of a roughterrain forklift.
    16. 16. #10 1926.453(b)(2)(v)• No Fall Protection inaerial lifts.• Worker in photo iswearing a full bodyharness for fall arrest.• Nearly 400 aerial liftdeaths since 2000.• Users need a PAL’scard or specific handson user training.
    17. 17. Develop Safety Rules• Follow Aerial Lift Manufacturer’sinstructions. Use ANSI A92 standards onaerial lifts if you cannot get them.• Follow Warning Labels.• Only trained personnel can operate thelifts.• A trained person must inspect themachine before each shift.• And many more!
    18. 18. Aerial Lift Training• Hands on training isnecessary. An aerial liftis not a car.• The worker should beable to demonstrate allpredicted uses of the liftand compliance withmanufacturersinstructions.• Always close lift platformchains or door. (This isalways required).• Many fatal falls are undersix feet.
    19. 19. Aerial Lift Training• The worker must knowwhere to attach thesnaphook for any aeriallift that has an OSHArated anchorage.• He is wearing a full bodyharness for fall arrest.• Guardrails are not meantto be used as anchorageson an aerial lift.• The manufacturer’smanual will designate theproper anchorage points.
    20. 20. Aerial Lift Training• National Training guidelines• International Powered Access Federation(IPAF) www.ipaf.org• "Spot the Mistake" video• Promotes safe and effective of product• 15 training centers/companies in the US.• Successful trainees are awarded the PALCard (Powered Access License) as proofof training
    21. 21. Bubbling Under the Top Ten• 1926.652(a)(1) – cave-inprotection• 1926.451(e)(1) – Unsafescaffold access• 1926.501(b)(11) – No fallarrest on steep roofs• 1926.451(b)(1) – Scaffoldneeded stable footing• 1926.20(b)(1) – noaccident preventionprogram
    22. 22. Thanks• To Kenny for all his help.• My email is johnanewquist@gmail.com• www.buildsafe.org is a nonprofit where Iteach many classes.• Follow me on Facebook where I posteveryday on OSHA and safety.

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