Draft 7.29.2011<br />Cutting it Close: Safety in Agricultural Services<br />
Experience doesn’t guarantee safety<br />“Wilson said Vargas's screams would have been drowned out by the noise of the chi...
Two teens electrocuted by irrigation system <br />"I heard them yelling. I went over to help,“ Tristen Dudley, 13, of Rock...
Youth employment and deaths in the agricultural sectors<br /><ul><li>1.12 million children and adolescents under the age o...
590,000 of these youth perform work on the farm
An additional 307,000 children and adolescents were hired to work on U.S. farms in 2006
From 1995-2002, 113 youth die annually from farm-related injuries</li></li></ul><li>Deaths in Ag services at higher rate t...
Provide workers with the right training<br />Areas of Ag services in which workers must receive training according to fede...
Provide workers proper protection<br />The employer is responsible for providing personal protective equipment, [PPE] - 19...
Provide workers with the right tools<br />To create a safe work space, employers must give their employers proper working ...
Beating the heat – a special note on working in warm weather<br />"Heat illness is 100 percent preventable, and it starts ...
Skin protection<br /> Ways to cool off in hot temperatures and to protect the body from harmful UV rays<br /><ul><li>Wear ...
Wear a wide-brimmed hat; baseball caps don’t shade the head as well
Use sunscreen – minimum SPF 30
UV-absorbent sunglasses
Limit exposure whenever possible</li></ul>Protection from heat and humidity<br /><ul><li>Drink small amounts of water freq...
Take breaks in the shade
Avoid caffeine, alcohol, sugars
Work in the shade if possible
Know if any prescriptions turn deadly in high temperatures</li></li></ul><li>How to trim and fell trees safely<br />
Assess the area<br />“To fell a tree” doesn’t mean just cutting it down.<br />Felling incorporates the action by which tre...
Things to remember when felling trees<br />Determine felling direction<br />Take into account dead trees, direction of pre...
Avoid and clear power lines<br /><ul><li>Tree trimming and removal work done within ten feet of a power line requires trai...
In addition to training, a second trained trimmer must be within the vicinity to assist the first worker in case something...
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  • OSHA photo: https://www.uta.edu/wconnect/osha/static/osha-home.shtml
  • http://www.abcactionnews.com/dpp/news/region_tampa/wood-chipper-kills-tree-trimmer-on-the-jobPosted: 09/25/2010By: Kristal RobertsTAMPA - A Tampa tree trimmer is dead after one mistake left him fighting against the force a wood chipper, Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office said.44-year-old Miguel Vargas was a part of a five man crew trimming trees on Golf Crest Trail in Tampa around 3:30 Saturday afternoon. He was at the back of the wood chipper machine, feeding branches into the chipper, investigators saidDwayne Wilson, Vargas&apos;s boss, told ABC Action News he heard the sound of something other than wood grounding in his chipper, which sent him scrambling for his emergency button. But by then there was little anyone could do.&quot;It was too late. I mean, when I heard the rope go through.&quot; Wilson said, &quot;I heard a piece of metal and I ran back to shut the machine down and when I did, I looked and saw him on the ground.Vargas accidentally got tangled in rope that was around the branches, and fought from being pulled into the wood chipper, Wilson said.&quot;When The force of the wood chipper pulling the rope Miguel struggled against the rope trying to escape the chipper but was decapitated within seconds, Wilson said.He was pronounced dead at the scene.Vargas worked for Dwayne Wilson Tree Service for the last 7 years and had used the woodchipper for the last 4.The sheriff&apos;s office calls what happened an accident, but for the crew members and the girlfriend Vargas leaves behind the question of why may never be answered.http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1315616/Gardener-decapitated-rope-slips-neck-sucked-wood-chipper.html#ixzz1TAzh8VHrhttp://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/northamerica/usa/8028834/Gardener-decapitated-in-freak-wood-chipper-accident.html
  • http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2019144/Jade-Garza-Hannah-Kendall-killed-electrocuted-farm-accident.html?ito=feeds-newsxmlTeenage best friends killed after being electrocuted in farm freak accident By KATY B. OLSONLast updated at 9:03 AM on 27th July 2011Two teenage girls died after being electrocuted in a freak farm accident while working in a cornfield on Monday. Fourteen-year-olds Jade Garza and Hannah Kendall of Sterling, Illinois, were electrocuted after coming into contact with a field irrigator. The two best friends were working in a cornfield in northwestern Illinois.  According to a statement released by their employer, the Monsanto Corporation, the pair were ‘electrically shocked by a centre pivot irrigation system’. Seventy-two other workers were working in the field at the time. Two other workers were seriously injured. Six other workers received treatment for non-life-threatening injuries. Monsanto Corporation CEO Hugh Grant said in a statement: ‘I am saddened by this terrible accident and loss. We place the highest priority on the safety of our contractors and employees.&apos;Our greatest concern at this time is the well being of the family and friends of those involved in today’s devastating accident.’ The Sauk Valley Media newspaper reported that the girls would have entered their freshman year at Sterling High School this fall.  Fourteen- and fifteen-year-olds may be employed for non-hazardous farm work during non-school hours, according to Department of Labor Youth Employment laws.  The accident is being investigated by Occupational Safety and Health Administration representatives and may take up to six months to complete.After the horrific tragedy, friends took to social media websites to pay tribute to the young girls.Matthew Belcher wrote: &apos;No words can do justice - nor express our collective sorrow - may Hannah and Jade rest in peace - and may the joy they brought forth, live forever on.&apos;Sara Jo Kahly added: &apos;This is such a horrible tradegy. Who knew such a cruel thing could happen like this at work. &apos;Kidz are out there trying to make money because theres no way else too. This hits me hard. This could have been prevented if the managers wouldnt have had them work... R.I.P girls. You will be missed by many.&apos;
  • OSHA Agricultural Operations web page: http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/agriculturaloperations/index.html
  • Revisions to the 2009 Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) counts: http://www.bls.gov/iif/oshwc/cfoi/cfoi_revised09.pdfhttp://data.bls.gov/gqt/RequestData#download.f.8
  • The following standards in part 1910 of this Chapter shall apply to agricultural operations:1928.21(a)(1)Temporary labor camps - 1910.142;1928.21(a)(2)Storage and handling of anhydrous ammonia - 1910.111(a) and (b);1928.21(a)(3)Logging Operations - 1910.266;1928.21(a)(4)Slow-moving vehicles - 1910.145.1928.21(a)(5)Hazard communication - 1910.1200.1928.21(a)(6)Cadmium - 1910.1027.1928.21(a)(7)Retention of DOT markings, placards and labels - 1910.1201.1928.21(b)Except to the extent specified in paragraph (a) of this section, the standards contained in Subparts B through T and Subpart Z of part 1910 of this title do not apply to agricultural operations. 1928.51(b)(1)Roll-over protective structures (ROPS). ROPS shall be provided by the employer for each tractor operated by an employee. Except as provided in paragraph (b)(5) of this section, a ROPS used on wheel-type tractors shall meet the test and performance requirements of 29 CFR 1928.52, 1928.53, or 1926.1002 as appropriate. A ROPS used on track-type tractors shall meet the test and performance requirements of 29 CFR 1926.1001.
  • EyeRounds Online Atlas of OpthamologyContributor: Andrew Doan, MD, PhD, University of Iowawww.eyerounds.org/trauma.htmhttp://webeye.ophth.uiowa.edu/eyeforum/atlas/pages/open-globe-from-mowing-the-lawn.htmlOSHA Regulations for providing workers with PPE: http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=STANDARDS&amp;p_id=9777
  • Photo and information: http://www.osha.gov/doc/outreachtraining/htmlfiles/tools.html
  • OSHA Fact Sheet: Working Outdoors in Warm Climates: http://www.osha.gov/OshDoc/data_Hurricane_Facts/working_outdoors.pdfPhoto of male worker: http://healthsafetysecurityincte.blogspot.com/2011/05/osha-launches-program-to-protect.htmlHealth, Safety &amp; Security Trends in Career and Technical Education: http://healthsafetysecurityincte.blogspot.com/2011/05/osha-launches-program-to-protect.htmlQuote from Stephanie McFarland, spokeswoman for the Indiana Department of Laborhttp://www.theindychannel.com/news/28663935/detail.htmlCoroner: Heat Involved In Man&apos;s Death At WorkCompany Didn&apos;t Report Death, State SaysPOSTED: 10:25 pm EDT July 25, 2011UPDATED: 10:56 am EDT July 26, 2011COLUMBUS, Ind. -- A southern Indiana man who collapsed while working at a foundry died of a heart attack complicated by extreme heat, the Bartholomew County Coroner&apos;s Office said.Charles Hulse, 50, of North Vernon, collapsed while at his work station at CE Systems Inc. in Columbus on Thursday.Bartholomew County Chief Deputy Coroner Larry Fisher said Hulse was on medication for hypertension and high cholesterol. He had started feeling overwhelmed by the heat, but had taken a break in a cool room before returning to work.The Republic reported that the death was ruled from natural causes. Temperatures reached the mid-90s that day, with a heat index of about 115 degrees.The Indiana Department of Labor is investigating the circumstances of the death at the foundry that makes iron castings for heavy equipment manufacturers.&quot;We&apos;ll take a look at everything from the workplace itself, where the employee was doing the work, what type of work the employee was doing,&quot; said Stephanie McFarland, spokeswoman for the Department of Labor.The Indiana Occupational Safety and Health Administration said companies are required to report workplace fatalities to the state within eight hours, but Hulse&apos;s death was not reported until Monday.Hulse&apos;s family knew he worked in hot conditions, but they didn&apos;t think it was so hot that it could contribute to his death.&quot;It shouldn&apos;t have happened at all, because now we&apos;re without him,&quot; said Hulse&apos;s son, Charles Hulse Jr.The worker&apos;s son and widow both believe the heat played a big role in his death.&quot;They could have given him breaks. They could have asked him to go home because of the heat,&quot; Hulse said. &quot;It gets about 180 degrees in there.&quot;&quot;I feel like they need to have water, Gatorade, and when it&apos;s this hot, they need to be shut down,&quot; said Irene Hulse, wife of the man who died. &quot;They&apos;re just going to have to realize that due to the health of the people who get these things out, they&apos;re just going to have to wait.&quot;OSHA officials said heat-related deaths are preventable.&quot;Heat illness is 100 percent preventable, and it starts with a three-step process -- water, rest and shade -- and employers need to make sure their employees have access to free drinking water and frequent rest, given the high heat and humid conditions we&apos;ve had,&quot; McFarland said.The recent heat wave prompted dozens of calls from workers all over the state asking about their rights, McFarland said. At least 50 people from various companies have complained of uncomfortable working conditions.Hulse&apos;s family said he was a hard worker who will be sorely missed.&quot;He was only 50 years old. He had a whole life ahead of him, three kids, six grandkids. Now, he&apos;s not here,&quot; said Nancy Edwards.6News left a message with CE Systems Monday night, but the company had not returned the call.Services for Charles Hulse will be Tuesday at Dove and Sharp Funeral Home in North Vernon, where the family is accepting contributions to help pay for funeral expenses.Indiana Department of Labor: http://www.in.gov/dol/
  • OSHA Fact Sheet: Working Outdoors in Warm Climateshttp://www.osha.gov/OshDoc/data_Hurricane_Facts/working_outdoors.pdfPhoto of female worker:http://healthsafetysecurityincte.blogspot.com/2011/05/osha-launches-program-to-protect.html
  • Photos:http://www.google.com/imgres?q=trimming+trees&amp;um=1&amp;hl=en&amp;rlz=1C1SKPC_enUS359US413&amp;tbm=isch&amp;tbnid=hLPDhqfu5kgHkM:&amp;imgrefurl=http://www.life123.com/home-garden/trees-shrubs/planting-care/making-the-cut-proper-shrub-and-tree-pruning.shtml&amp;docid=BjyHSvvosrHJLM&amp;w=425&amp;h=282&amp;ei=xi4uTrHuC-rksQK3nPmNAQ&amp;zoom=1&amp;iact=hc&amp;vpx=139&amp;vpy=285&amp;dur=302&amp;hovh=183&amp;hovw=276&amp;tx=81&amp;ty=86&amp;page=1&amp;tbnh=140&amp;tbnw=185&amp;start=0&amp;ndsp=24&amp;ved=1t:429,r:5,s:0&amp;biw=1032&amp;bih=911http://www.google.com/imgres?q=trimming+trees&amp;um=1&amp;hl=en&amp;rlz=1C1SKPC_enUS359US413&amp;tbm=isch&amp;tbnid=_-TjrU1PVeIF5M:&amp;imgrefurl=http://www.turfplusmgt.com/tree_removal_pruning.htm&amp;docid=SSuq6Ful2FphPM&amp;w=550&amp;h=292&amp;ei=xi4uTrHuC-rksQK3nPmNAQ&amp;zoom=1&amp;iact=hc&amp;vpx=493&amp;vpy=413&amp;dur=4&amp;hovh=163&amp;hovw=308&amp;tx=146&amp;ty=84&amp;page=1&amp;tbnh=93&amp;tbnw=176&amp;start=0&amp;ndsp=24&amp;ved=1t:429,r:22,s:0&amp;biw=1032&amp;bih=911http://www.google.com/imgres?q=trimming+trees+electrical+wires&amp;um=1&amp;hl=en&amp;rlz=1C1SKPC_enUS359US413&amp;tbm=isch&amp;tbnid=1emNHlizvSy8aM:&amp;imgrefurl=http://tri-countyelectric.coop/treeTrimming.aspx&amp;docid=CFKY99fNhbHD2M&amp;w=320&amp;h=240&amp;ei=IjEuTvufGPGIsAKVutln&amp;zoom=1&amp;iact=hc&amp;vpx=303&amp;vpy=91&amp;dur=343&amp;hovh=192&amp;hovw=256&amp;tx=92&amp;ty=82&amp;page=1&amp;tbnh=132&amp;tbnw=207&amp;start=0&amp;ndsp=23&amp;ved=1t:429,r:1,s:0&amp;biw=1032&amp;bih=868http://www.wickedlocal.com/plymouth/town_info/calendars/x1693433171/Briefly-Oct-17#axzz1TB5mtZBs
  • Photo: http://www.fao.org/docrep/004/ac142e/ac142e0d.htm
  • Minnesota Safety Hazard Alert: http://www.dli.mn.gov/OSHA/PDF/hazalert_treefelling.pdfPhoto: http://www.treecareindustry.org/articles/safety/TCI1008_p8.htm
  • Quote from Mike Garvin http://www.pressherald.com/business/tree-trimmers-create-a-real-buzz_2011-07-24.htmlhttp://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=STANDARDS&amp;p_id=9732http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_id=10758&amp;p_table=STANDARDS
  • OSHA Chain Saw Safety Quick Card: http://www.osha.gov/OshDoc/data_Hurricane_Facts/chain_saw_safety.pdfOSHA Chipper Machine Safety Quick Card: http://www.osha.gov/OshDoc/data_Hurricane_Facts/chipper_machine.pdf
  • Photo of farm: http://www.public-domain-image.com/transportation-vehicles-public-domain-images-pictures/tractor-public-domain-images-pictures/farmer-and-tractor-tilling-soil.jpg.html
  • OSHA Safety Procedures for TractorsBy Erika Beckline, eHow ContributorAugust 4, 2010A young child was killed when he fell off his father&apos;s lap and became entangled in the tractor&apos;s rear power take-off shaft, according to the National Ag Safety Database. Accidents with the power take-off shaft or tractor riders are not uncommon. To protect farm workers, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) enforces several regulations regarding tractors. Industry-specific regulations may also apply for tractors used in construction, logging, or other applications.Rollover ProtectionAccording to OSHA Standard 1928.51, tractors must have a rollover protective structure that meets the applicable standard --- either 1928.52, 1928.53, 1926.1002, or 1926.1003 --- for tractors used in industrial applications. The rollover protection must have a label stating the manufacturer&apos;s name and address, the model number and that the structure was tested according to standards. These tractors must also be equipped with a seat belt that meets standard 1928.51. The tractor must also provide protection to the driver from spilled liquids and sharp edges in the event of a rollover. Low profile tractors and other equipment, like fruit harvesters, are exempt from this requirement.Other Protective DevicesOSHA requires protective guards on all parts of the power drive system, allowing only enough exposure for proper operation. According to Standard 1928.57, the tractor must also have a master shield on the rear power take-off to protect the driver and other workers from shaft entanglement. The master shield must be able to withstand 250 pounds. All guards, shields and access door must be in place when the tractor is in operation. There must be signs on the tractor stating this also. When performing maintenance or repairs, do not remove any of these safety devices until the tractor is powered down and all parts have stopped moving completely.Safe OperationOSHA Standard 1928 requires employers instruct tractor operators on safe operation including:- always wearing the seat belt- making sure everyone is clear when starting and operating the tractor- taking care and reducing speed when operating near potential hazards such as ditches, trees, slopes and rough surfaces- avoiding steep slopes when possible- not allowing riders- properly securing the brakes- properly hitching the tractor only at the points recommended by the manufacturerRead more: OSHA Safety Procedures for Tractors | eHow.comhttp://www.ehow.com/list_6816531_osha-safety-procedures-tractors.html#ixzz1TPNA3QoL
  • OSHA Fact Sheet, Farm Safety: http://www.osha.gov/OshDoc/data_General_Facts/FarmFactS2.pdfCody Rigsby story, grain elevator: http://www.denverpost.com/breakingnews/ci_18560602?source=rssThe grain-elevator company where a teenager died after suffocating in a pile of grain two years ago is expected to plead guilty next week to a criminal charge of aiding and abetting and workplace safety violations.Representatives of Tempel Grain Elevators, based in Wiley, are expected to appear in U.S. District Court at 10 a.m. Aug. 5 for a change of plea hearing and immediate sentencing, according to court records.John Richilano, an attorney for Tempel Grain, said after the charge was filed Tuesday that the company was in &quot;the final stages of reaching an agreement with the government.&quot; Richilano could not immediately be reached for comment Wednesday.Jeff Dorschner, a spokesman for the U.S. Attorney&apos;s Office, declined to release the details of the agreement before next week&apos;s sentencing.The charge carries up to a $500,000 fine, but other terms could be determined by a judge and the probation department.Cody Rigsby, 17, died at a grain elevator Tempel Grain operated in Haswell in Kiowa County. On May 29, 2009, he climbed a ladder and entered a grain bin, where the grain continued to flow and engulfed him, suffocating him, according to court documents.
  • Ag safety

    1. 1. Draft 7.29.2011<br />Cutting it Close: Safety in Agricultural Services<br />
    2. 2. Experience doesn’t guarantee safety<br />“Wilson said Vargas's screams would have been drowned out by the noise of the chipper as it stripped and shredded branches.”<br />Accidents might happen, but with awareness, they can always be prevented<br />44-year-old Miguel Vargas had worked for Dwayne Wilson Tree Service for seven years.<br />A rope around a branch Vargas was feeding into a wood chipper became tangled around his neck, and pulled him into the machine.<br />Vargas’ boss, Wilson, immediately turned off the machine – when he looked at Vargas, the machine had already decapitated him.<br />
    3. 3. Two teens electrocuted by irrigation system <br />"I heard them yelling. I went over to help,“ Tristen Dudley, 13, of Rock Falls, said. "I didn't do anything because I would have been sucked in."<br />Fourteen-year-olds Jade Garza and Hannah Kendall were working in a cornfield in northwestern Illinois.<br />While removing tassels from corn, the two friends were “electrically shocked by a center pivot irrigation system.”<br />An OSHA investigation into the deaths is ongoing.<br />
    4. 4. Youth employment and deaths in the agricultural sectors<br /><ul><li>1.12 million children and adolescents under the age of 20 live on farms – 2006
    5. 5. 590,000 of these youth perform work on the farm
    6. 6. An additional 307,000 children and adolescents were hired to work on U.S. farms in 2006
    7. 7. From 1995-2002, 113 youth die annually from farm-related injuries</li></li></ul><li>Deaths in Ag services at higher rate than most private sector industries<br />According to the 2009 Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) there were 4,551 fatal occupation injuries<br />In the agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting industries, there were 575 fatal occupational injuries<br />12.6 percent of deaths occurred in this sector<br />The overall fatal work injury rate for the U.S. in 2009 was 3.5 fatal injuries per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers<br />The rate of death in the agricultural, forestry, fishing, and hunting industries in 2009 was 27.2 people per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers<br />This is one of the highest rate of deaths among all industries covered by OSHA<br />Causes of fatalities in ag services industries in 2009:<br />Contact with objects and equipment (170)<br />Struck by object (97)<br />Caught in or compressed by equipment or objects (58)<br />Transportation incidents (284)<br />Falls (32)<br />
    8. 8. Provide workers with the right training<br />Areas of Ag services in which workers must receive training according to federal law:<br />The best way to stop preventable accidents and deaths from occurring is to educate the workforce <br />It’s the law<br />This investment might seem unnecessary in the short-term, but in the long-term it saves lives and costs less than having to pay worker compensation and legal battles<br />Temporary Labor Camps – 1910.142<br />Logging – 1910.266<br />Hazard Communication – 1910.1200<br />Cadmium – 1910.1027<br />Roll-Over Protective Structures for Tractors Used in Agricultural Operations – 1928.51 (d)<br />Guarding of Farm Field Equipment, Farmstead Equipment, Cotton Gins – 1928.57 (a) (6(i) through (v)<br />OSHA standards 1910 apply to all non farming operations and only in certain operations on farms. <br />
    9. 9. Provide workers proper protection<br />The employer is responsible for providing personal protective equipment, [PPE] - 1910.132(f)(1)<br />Agricultural services rely on machines and tools that are dangerous if used improperly and without protective shielding.<br />Workers should wear helmets, gloves, goggles, and other PPE that will prevent injury and even death.<br />The eye pictured of above is a patient who was mowing without protective safety goggles. His retina was irreparably damaged, blinding him in that eye. <br />
    10. 10. Provide workers with the right tools<br />To create a safe work space, employers must give their employers proper working tools.<br />Workers should pay attention when using electrical tools; these implements can shock and burn workers if used carelessly.<br />Damaged electronic tools should be removed from the work space and discarded.<br />Tools should receive routine maintenance and cleaning, which allows safe use and maximum utilization.<br /><ul><li>Hazard moving parts, such as the rotating metal of a saw, must have guards to protect workers from injury.</li></li></ul><li>Factor in weather conditions<br />Never work in adverse weather conditions.<br />Before working on trees, look at weather reports and determine if any storms could endanger yourself or your workers.<br />Trees act as large conduits of electricity – in a lightning storm, standing beneath a tree is one of the most dangerous places to be.<br />Rain causes slippery surfaces on which workers can trip and fall.<br />
    11. 11. Beating the heat – a special note on working in warm weather<br />"Heat illness is 100 percent preventable, and it starts with a three-step process -- water, rest and shade -- and employers need to make sure their employees have access to free drinking water and frequent rest, given the high heat and humid conditions we've had.” – <br />Indiana Department of Labor spokeswoman <br />Stephanie McFarland <br />This summer, we’ve had record highs. Just because the sky is blue and the sun is shining doesn’t mean conditions are safe for workers. Make sure to provide employees with the following amenities when they’re working in the heat and sun. <br />
    12. 12. Skin protection<br /> Ways to cool off in hot temperatures and to protect the body from harmful UV rays<br /><ul><li>Wear loose-fitting, light-colored, long-sleeved shirts and pants (cotton)
    13. 13. Wear a wide-brimmed hat; baseball caps don’t shade the head as well
    14. 14. Use sunscreen – minimum SPF 30
    15. 15. UV-absorbent sunglasses
    16. 16. Limit exposure whenever possible</li></ul>Protection from heat and humidity<br /><ul><li>Drink small amounts of water frequently
    17. 17. Take breaks in the shade
    18. 18. Avoid caffeine, alcohol, sugars
    19. 19. Work in the shade if possible
    20. 20. Know if any prescriptions turn deadly in high temperatures</li></li></ul><li>How to trim and fell trees safely<br />
    21. 21. Assess the area<br />“To fell a tree” doesn’t mean just cutting it down.<br />Felling incorporates the action by which tree trimmers designate a safe area in which the tree can fall.<br />More people are killed felling than during any other logging activity.<br />
    22. 22. Things to remember when felling trees<br />Determine felling direction<br />Take into account dead trees, direction of pressure, and other trees that could complicate the process<br />Provide retreat path for logger<br />Keep tabs on all workers’ locations<br />Types of preferred tree felling:<br />Top cut<br />Bottom or under cut<br />Back cut<br />
    23. 23. Avoid and clear power lines<br /><ul><li>Tree trimming and removal work done within ten feet of a power line requires trained and experienced tree trimmers who know how to create safe cutting environments.
    24. 24. In addition to training, a second trained trimmer must be within the vicinity to assist the first worker in case something were to go array (1910.269(r))
    25. 25. Employing that second working and paying for training might seem pricey in the short-run, but the long-term payoff is significantly beneficial.</li></li></ul><li>Ensure a safe working environment at all heights<br /> Falling is the leading cause of workplace death among all industry occupational fatalities recorded by OSHA<br /> “Lift controls shall be tested each day prior to use to determine that such controls are in safe working condition.” - 1910.67(c)(2)(i)<br />When working from an aerial lift, a body belt should be worn and attached to the boom or basket by a lanyard<br />Weight limits specified by the manufacturers should never be exceeded<br /><ul><li>“…an average of two tree care workers die every week on the job. There are about 200,000 tree care workers nationwide. Electrocution, falling from heights and being struck by falling branches are top hazards.” – Mike Garvin, CEO of Tree Care Industry Association</li></li></ul><li>Noise – don’t let it get to you <br />Noise is a common workplace hazard workers in the various ag services<br />OSHA’s permissible exposure limit, or PEL, is 85 dBA for all workers for an 8 hour day<br />Many of the machines workers use routinely exceed OSHA’s dBA limit.<br />The best solutions<br />Invest in machines that have vibration reduction technology; they significantly aid in noise level reduction and worker health<br />Purchase ear protection for all workers<br />
    26. 26. Essential practices to remember when using tree trimming machinery<br />Chainsaws <br />Wood chippers<br />Before use, check the parts of the chainsaw to make sure it will function properly<br />Start the saw on the ground; drop starting is NEVER allowed<br />Clear away debris, branches, rock and metals away from the chains path<br />Maintain balance and focus when operating the saw<br />Wear PPE to protect your body<br />Do not wear loose-fitting clothes<br />Be careful that the branch or tree being cut does not bind the chainsaw<br />Be careful about chainsaw kickback<br />To avoid this, DO NOT saw with tip<br />Keep tip guard in place<br />Understand the manufacturer’s guidelines for machine operation<br />Undergo thorough training of the machine<br />NEVER reach into the chipper while it is turned on<br />Chippers make a lot of noise and chew up and shoot out debris – wear PPE, including earplugs, safety glasses, hard hats and gloves<br />Maintain a safe distance (two tree or log lengths) from chipper operations and other workers<br />Remember to use the lockout system to prevent the chipper from restarting when servicing the chipper<br />
    27. 27. Farming Safety<br />Farming can be a rewarding job. But there are many dangers inherent in farming. The profession involves heavy machinery, potentially deadly chemicals, animals, and incorporating family into the work force. Also, farms are in rural, remote settings far from the care of hospitals or doctors’ offices. Preventative measures outlined in OSHA guidelines and regulations will help farmers and their farmhands maintain safe working environments.<br />
    28. 28. Tractors and Large Machinery<br />Most farm accidents involve heavy machinery<br />All farming implements should have proper guard protection, much like any other tool in any other industry<br />Routine maintenance to tractors and other machinery keeps machine functional and operating safely<br />Tractors must have sufficient rollover protective structures that meet OSHA standards - 1928.51<br />Just as when driving a car, tractor drivers should be aware of their surrounding. Blind spots endanger fellow farm hands or family members on the ground.<br />Quick tips for tractor safety <br />(OSHA Standard 1928)<br />Avoid steep slopes<br />Buckle up<br />Properly secure the brakes<br />Make sure the path on which you’re driving the tractor is clear of people and obstacles<br />Do not allow riders<br />
    29. 29. Chemical Safety<br />Short-term and long-term exposure to certain farm chemicals can cause irreversible adverse health effects<br />There are numerous ways pesticides and other farming chemicals can enter the body: the skin, clothes, or breathing<br />The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that 10,000 to 20,000 poisonings happen every year among agricultural workers.<br />To prevent poisoning and other dangerous health complications, make sure to do the following:<br />Be trained to use the chemicals you’re spraying on crops<br />Be aware that at any given time, there might be pesticides on the plants, in the soil, irrigation water <br />Keep chemicals in restricted areas<br />Wash before eating or any activity involving the hands<br />Wear PPE to protect the body<br />Shower after working with chemicals<br />Wash your work clothes separately from other laundry<br />If contact is made with a chemical, wash it off immediately and seek medical attention<br />
    30. 30. Family and Child Safety<br /><ul><li>Farming, unlike many other occupations, involves an area co-inhabited by a residence and workplace
    31. 31. Members of the family become de facto farmhands to help the family business
    32. 32. Injury rates are highest among two groups: workers over 65 and the youth, ages 15 and under
    33. 33. Children playing around the house and the barn are subjected to many dangers.
    34. 34. Machinery
    35. 35. Animals
    36. 36. Chemicals
    37. 37. Not only should workers on the farm undergo proper training to deal with the dangers associated in everyday farming, but the family should be educated to ensure their normal day-to-day lives are not disrupted by preventable accidents</li></ul>Cody Rigsby, 17, died at a grain elevator Tempel Grain operated in Haswell in Kiowa County. On May 29, 2009, he climbed a ladder and entered a grain bin, where the grain continued to flow and engulfed him, suffocating him, according to court documents. – Liz Navratil, Denver Post, July 27, 2011<br />
    38. 38. Education is the best means of prevention<br />This presentation scratches the surface of all the safety guidelines and regulations OSHA enforces to protect the United State workforce in agricultural service industries. Before starting work in any industry, workers must educate themselves with proper training to protect themselves; it is also their employer’s responsibility to provide that training. A class can go a long way to ensure workers’ safety. Investing in safety might mean a short-term set back, but employers who take the time to create a safe working environment benefit the most by having healthy employees and profitable business endeavors.<br />
    39. 39. Further <br />This ppt was prepared by Trevor Eischen as a preliminary aid for people required to work in agriculture services.<br />Thanks to John Newquist, Tonya Ford and Janet S. for corrections and suggestions. <br />This is not an official OSHA publication. Those will be on the OSHA.gov website. <br />trevoreischen1714@gmail.com is my email if you see any errors. This is just a draft as of the cover date.<br />

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