Adverse Weather

1,889 views

Published on

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,889
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
30
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
250
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Adverse Weather

    1. 1. Adverse Weather
    2. 2. Heat Related Illnesses <ul><li>Heat Cramps </li></ul><ul><li>Heat Exhaustion </li></ul><ul><li>Heat Stroke </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The leading cause for all heat-related illnesses is dehydration, especially if over 3% of body weight </li></ul></ul>
    3. 3. Heat Related Illness <ul><li>Although heat-related illnesses are treatable and preventable, on average 240 people die of heat-related illnesses in the United States each year. </li></ul>
    4. 4. Heat Regulating Mechanisms (The body had 4 methods of regulating heat) <ul><li>Conduction – The body coming in contact with something cold (cold packs or Ice) </li></ul><ul><li>Convection – Air passing over the body, lifting heat away (wind or fans) </li></ul><ul><li>Radiation– Heat dissipating from the body </li></ul><ul><li>Evaporation – Sweat evaporating cools the body </li></ul>
    5. 5. Heat Cramps <ul><li>Muscle cramps caused by excessive loss of salts (electrolytes) </li></ul><ul><li>Typically in the legs or abdomen </li></ul><ul><li>Symptoms </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Elevated body temp </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Thirst </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Muscle cramps </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sweating </li></ul></ul>
    6. 6. Heat Exhaustion <ul><li>Caused by exposure to high heat and humidity for hours, resulting in excessive loss of fluids and salts through heavy perspiration </li></ul><ul><li>If untreated my lead to heat stroke </li></ul><ul><li>Symptoms </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Same as heat cramps plus </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Nausea/Vomiting </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Headache/Confusion </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Malaise </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Lightheadedness </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Dizziness </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Irritability </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Cool/Moist/Pale Skin </li></ul></ul></ul>
    7. 7. Heat Stroke <ul><li>Caused by overexposure to extreme heat, resulting in the breakdown of the body’s heat regulating mechanisms </li></ul><ul><li>Core body temperature of 104 Degrees F or more. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Deadliest heat Illness </li></ul></ul><ul><li>May lead to brain damage, coma or death </li></ul><ul><li>Symptoms </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Same as heat exhaustion plus </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Delirium </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Seizure </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Coma </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Kidney Failure </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Irregular Heartbeat </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Shock </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Pulmonary Edema </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Hot/Dry/Red Skin </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Lowered Level of Consciousness </li></ul></ul></ul>
    8. 8. Conditions That Contribute to Heat-Related Illness <ul><li>Fever </li></ul><ul><li>Dehydration </li></ul><ul><li>Prolonged exertion </li></ul><ul><li>Cardiac Conditions </li></ul><ul><li>Diabetes </li></ul><ul><li>Eating Disorders </li></ul><ul><li>Obesity </li></ul><ul><li>Sleep Deprivation </li></ul><ul><li>Previous heat stroke </li></ul><ul><li>Use of equipment or heavy clothing </li></ul><ul><li>Alcohol use </li></ul>
    9. 9. The Heat Index describes what the temperature really feels like. It is a composite of the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation and elevation on the human body   RELATIVE HUMIDITY (%) Temp. 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 95 100 110 (47) 136 (58)                         108 (43) 130 (54) 137 (58)                       106 (41) 124 (51) 130 (54) 137 (58)                     104 (40) 119 (48) 124 (51) 131 (55) 137 (58)                   102 (39) 114 (46) 119 (48) 124 (51) 130 (54) 137 (58)                 100 (38) 109 (43) 114 (46) 118 (48) 124 (51) 129 (54) 136 (58)               98 (37) 105 (41) 109 (43) 113 (45) 117 (47) 123 (51) 128 (53) 134 (57)             96 (36) 101 (38) 104 (40) 108 (42) 112 (44) 116 (47) 121 (49) 126 (52) 132 (56)           94 (34) 97 (36) 100 (38) 103 (39) 106 (41) 110 (43) 114 (46) 119 (48) 124 (51) 129 (54) 135 (57)       92 (33) 94 (34) 96 (36) 99 (37) 101 (38) 105 (41) 108 (42) 112 (44) 116 (47) 121 (49) 126 (52) 131 (55)     90 (32) 91 (33) 93 (34) 95 (35) 97 (36) 100 (38) 103 (39) 106 (41) 109 (43) 113 (45) 117 (47) 122 (50) 127 (53) 132 (56) 88 (31) 88 (31) 89 (32) 91 (33) 93 (34) 95 (35) 98 (37) 100 (38) 103 (39) 106 (41) 110 (43) 113 (45) 117 (47) 121 (49) 86 (30) 85 (29) 87 (31) 88 (31) 89 (32) 91 (33) 93 (34) 95 (35) 97 (36) 100 (38) 102 (39) 105 (41) 108 (42) 112 (44) 84 (29) 83 (28) 84 (29) 85 (29) 86 (30) 88 (31) 89 (32) 90 (32) 92 (33) 94 (34) 96 (36) 98 (37) 100 (38) 103 (39) 82 (28) 81 (27) 82 (28) 83 (28) 84 (29) 84 (29) 85 (29) 86 (30) 88 (31) 89 (32) 90 (32) 91 (33) 93 (34) 95 (35) 80 (27) 80 (27) 80 (27) 81 (27) 81 (27) 82 (28) 82 (28) 83 (28) 84 (29) 84 (29) 85 (29) 86 (30) 86 (30) 87 (31)
    10. 10. Category Heat Index Possible heat disorders for people in high risk groups Extreme Danger 130°F or higher (54°C or higher) Heat stroke or sunstroke likely. Danger 105 - 129°F (41 - 54°C) Sunstroke, muscle cramps, and/or heat exhaustion likely. Heatstroke possible with prolonged exposure and/or physical activity. Extreme Caution 90 - 105°F (32 - 41°C) Sunstroke, muscle cramps, and/or heat exhaustion possible with prolonged exposure and/or physical activity. Caution 80 - 90°F (27 - 32°C) Fatigue possible with prolonged exposure and/or physical activity
    11. 11. Treating Heat Related Illnesses <ul><li>Remove from heat </li></ul><ul><li>Call 911 if heat stroke is suspected </li></ul><ul><li>Remove excess clothing </li></ul><ul><li>Cool victim </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Fan, place cool wet towels on the head, neck, armpits, groin and under the knees, hose with water, a cool shower, ice bath </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Replace fluids </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Slowly, preferably with 1 teaspoon of salt per quart . </li></ul></ul>
    12. 12. Work Practices <ul><li>Schedule hot jobs for the cooler part of the day </li></ul><ul><li>Use relief workers </li></ul><ul><li>Assign extra workers </li></ul><ul><li>Provide rest periods with water breaks </li></ul><ul><li>Provide rest/recovery areas </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(AC, water and shade) </li></ul></ul>
    13. 13. Work Breaks <ul><li>During high heat workers must be allowed to have more breaks. </li></ul><ul><li>20 minutes for every 2 hours </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Yard may remain open and organized activities, such as softball, may take place because offenders voluntarily take part in them and it would be considered light work. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>86 degrees or higher for heavy work </li></ul><ul><li>88 degrees or higher for moderate work </li></ul><ul><li>90 degrees or higher for light work </li></ul><ul><li>Above 96 degrees only essential work other than light work can be done outdoors </li></ul>
    14. 14. Controls for Prevention of Heat Related Illnesses <ul><li>Engineering controls – Fans and air conditioning </li></ul><ul><li>Administrative Controls – Cool water, salt supplement and acclimatization </li></ul><ul><li>PPE – Reflective clothing, ice vests, wetted clothing, water cooled garments, etc. </li></ul>
    15. 15. Cold Emergencies Signs & Symptoms <ul><li>Shivering </li></ul><ul><li>Extremity numbness </li></ul><ul><li>Slurred speech </li></ul><ul><li>Slow pulse & breathing rates </li></ul><ul><li>Confusion </li></ul>
    16. 16. Frost Bite <ul><li>Freezing of body tissues from prolonged exposure to cold </li></ul><ul><li>Mostly affects the nose, Cheeks, Ears, Fingers & Toes </li></ul><ul><li>Warning Signs and Symptoms </li></ul><ul><ul><li>White or Grayish yellow skin </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Numb, firm or waxy feeling skin </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Itching/Burning Sesation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Numbness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Blistering </li></ul></ul>
    17. 17. Frost Bite
    18. 18. Treating Frostbite <ul><li>Immerse frostbitten areas in warm water if no medical care is available & there is no possibility of re-freezing </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Frost bite is very painful when it thaws </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Warm victim </li></ul><ul><li>Remove wet clothing </li></ul><ul><li>Remove from cold </li></ul><ul><li>Keep patient calm </li></ul><ul><li>Do not apply heat directly </li></ul><ul><li>Do not rub frostbitten areas </li></ul>
    19. 19. Hypothermia <ul><li>Symptoms </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Shivering in early stages </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Numbness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Drowsiness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rapid breathing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Apathetic </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Loss of motor control </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Muscle/joint rigidity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Decreased consciousness, glassy stare </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cool abdominal skin temp </li></ul></ul><ul><li>When your body is unable to maintain a core temperature of 95 degrees F. </li></ul>
    20. 20. Emergency Care Hypothermia <ul><li>Re-warming </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Warm water </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Body to body </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Blankets </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Warm Drink-no alcohol </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Remove any wet clothing </li></ul><ul><li>Transport to hospital </li></ul><ul><li>Care for shock </li></ul><ul><li>People pulled from icy water should avoid movement </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Movement of extremities can cause cold blood to return to the heart, which could alter cardiac rhythm </li></ul></ul>
    21. 21. Cold Weather <ul><li>Whenever the ambient air temperature is at or below 0 degrees Fahrenheit or the wind-chill is at or below –5 degrees Fahrenheit the watch commander may cancel all or portions of offender outdoor activities. </li></ul><ul><li>Essential work duties will continue as required </li></ul><ul><li>Staff performing essential work duties will be provided appropriate clothing </li></ul>
    22. 22. Lightening Warning <ul><li>While lightening on the horizon should warn of potential danger, thunder also means there is an immediate danger to individuals who are outdoors. </li></ul><ul><li>Do not resume outdoor activities until 30 minutes after a storm passes </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Lightening can strike 10 miles ahead of or behind a storm front and thunderhead clouds </li></ul></ul>
    23. 23. Tornados & Severe Weather <ul><li>Any time a tornado or severe weather is confirmed all facility occupants must seek shelter in designated shelters </li></ul><ul><li>Severe weather can include </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Large hail </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>High damaging winds </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lightening </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Heavy rains </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Master control will notify the watch commander when the weather service issues a severe weather watch or warning for the area around the facility </li></ul><ul><li>If a watch is issued the watch commander will notify those areas/staff who need to be on alert </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Perimeter, Squad, Yard, Etc . </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Any time a warning is declared the watch commander will activate IMS, assume command and direct all staff to inform offenders and staff of precautions to be taken </li></ul>
    24. 24. Watching for severe weather <ul><li>Staff can keep track of severe weather warning or watches at the National Weather Service website. </li></ul><ul><li>http//www.weather.gov/ </li></ul><ul><li>Type your zip code or click on the map to see current watches/warnings and radar images for your area </li></ul>
    25. 25. Any Questions?

    ×