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© John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015
Creating the
Value Proposition
For Mentoring©
JOHN SJOVALL & VALERIE SMITH PE...
© John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015
Welcome
John P. Sjovall Jr
President, Board of Directors | LTEN
Former Execut...
© John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015
Let’s start with an activity!
How do we
get to the
Value Proposition
 Strate...
© John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015
What is a Value Proposition?
 A Value Proposition reveals the connections be...
© John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015
Guiding Principles
Begin with the end in
mind and Start where
the organizatio...
© John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015
Guiding Principles
Know the culture
Speak to it
respectfully
 Assess the org...
© John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015
Guiding Principles
Engage
Stakeholders
“I never met a senior leader who
hadn’...
© John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015
Guiding Principles
What’s it
going to cost?
Cost is Multifaceted:
money, time...
© John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015
Guiding Principles
Engage
Participants
 Make it an honor – VP
nomination
 D...
© John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015
Activity #2
Speed Dating
 You have been nominated to be a Mentor or a Mentee...
© John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015
Facilitated Mentoring
“SOME PEARLS FOR A SUCCESSFUL MENTORING PROGRAM”
© John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015
Goal of Facilitated Mentoring
 Create a Mentoring Culture - ‘how we do thing...
© John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015
Facilitated Mentoring Steps
 Engagement
 Preparation
 Kickoff
 Support
 ...
© John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015
Facilitated Mentoring Process
or “How we did it”
Engagement
 Establish crite...
© John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015
Facilitated Mentoring Process
or “How we did it”
Preparation
 Mentor Worksho...
© John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015
Facilitated Mentoring Process
or “How we did it”
Kickoff
 Special event, off...
© John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015
Facilitated Mentoring Process
or “How we did it”
Support
 “The Mentor’s Guid...
© John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015
© John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015
Facilitated Mentoring Process
or “How we did it”
Wrap Up
“Tie a Bow
Around it...
© John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015
Facilitated Mentoring Process
or “How we did it”
Reinforce
The Value
Proposit...
© John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015
The Challenge of
Measurement and Evaluation
Key: Be willing to truly debate M...
© John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015
How we knew we were
CREATING A MENTORING CULTURE
 100% VP (stakeholder) part...
© John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015
Summary
 Mentoring happens everyday
 Facilitate it for organizational benef...
© John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015
Contacts
John P. Sjovall Jr
e: jsjovalljr@gmail.com
c: (203) 313-0234
Valerie...
© John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015
Your Feedback Is Important
Please take a moment to complete the workshop
eval...
© John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015
Appendix & References
© John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015
Selector
© John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015
How you know you are
CREATING A MENTORING CULTURE
 100% Stakeholder particip...
© John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015
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The value proposition for mentoring v7 copy

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Pointers on how to create a Value Proposition for organization-based Mentoring. Value Propositions are always being made and refined and relate to each stakeholder. The Value Proposition is personal and organizational, different for Mentors and Mentees. Our mentoring process, also shows how the Value Proposition is brought to life through the program, not just in creating a business case.

Published in: Leadership & Management
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The value proposition for mentoring v7 copy

  1. 1. © John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015 Creating the Value Proposition For Mentoring© JOHN SJOVALL & VALERIE SMITH PEASE
  2. 2. © John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015 Welcome John P. Sjovall Jr President, Board of Directors | LTEN Former Executive Director, Training & Development | Daiichi Sankyo, Inc. Valerie Smith Pease Owner | Valerie Smith Consulting
  3. 3. © John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015 Let’s start with an activity! How do we get to the Value Proposition  Strategic reasons why your organization / client might adopt a mentoring process?  Realistic outcomes to expect from a mentoring process?  Hurdles you might encounter when you introduce a mentoring process at your company / client?
  4. 4. © John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015 What is a Value Proposition?  A Value Proposition reveals the connections between what you are suggesting the organization do and its goals, in essence, the WIFFM. It enables stakeholders to take the steps to implement an intangible with faith that the promise will be delivered.  Another definition: A value proposition is a promise of value to be delivered and acknowledged and a belief from the customer that value will be delivered and experienced. A value proposition can apply to an entire organization, or parts thereof, or customer accounts, or products or services.
  5. 5. © John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015 Guiding Principles Begin with the end in mind and Start where the organization is  Know what you’re doing and do your homework  Put a framework together so you have something understandable to share  Solicit commentary and opinions and adapt the plan to what you learn
  6. 6. © John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015 Guiding Principles Know the culture Speak to it respectfully  Assess the organization’s appetite for change and ‘development fatigue’  Know and understand the implications of territorial disputes  Don’t punish the organization for its faults
  7. 7. © John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015 Guiding Principles Engage Stakeholders “I never met a senior leader who hadn’t had a Mentor somewhere along the way”  Piloting & Baby Steps  Flag-waving senior leader  Leverage their personal mentoring experiences  Anticipate stakeholders’ motivations and past experiences
  8. 8. © John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015 Guiding Principles What’s it going to cost? Cost is Multifaceted: money, time, effort and productivity  Balance cost of external vs. time and effort of internal staff  Focus on how mentoring enables productivity  Year One development costs reduce substantially in subsequent years
  9. 9. © John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015 Guiding Principles Engage Participants  Make it an honor – VP nomination  Define criteria for participating & preparation  OK to not participate  Assist invitees with discernment  Make it fun!
  10. 10. © John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015 Activity #2 Speed Dating  You have been nominated to be a Mentor or a Mentee.  Think of two questions you can ask the other candidates to help you find an effective Mentoring Partner.  Each of you will have 2 minutes each to determine whether this individual will be an effective mentoring partner for you.
  11. 11. © John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015 Facilitated Mentoring “SOME PEARLS FOR A SUCCESSFUL MENTORING PROGRAM”
  12. 12. © John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015 Goal of Facilitated Mentoring  Create a Mentoring Culture - ‘how we do things around here’.  Development opportunities for strong performers and HiPos.  To engage and showcase senior leaders to actively develop and engage valued staff and lead by example.
  13. 13. © John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015 Facilitated Mentoring Steps  Engagement  Preparation  Kickoff  Support  Wrap Up  Reinforce
  14. 14. © John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015 Facilitated Mentoring Process or “How we did it” Engagement  Establish criteria:  for length of service  performance ranking  band and any other culturally relevant criteria  VP Nomination  Briefing Sessions and Briefing Documents  Discernment Conversations
  15. 15. © John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015 Facilitated Mentoring Process or “How we did it” Preparation  Mentor Workshops  Mentee Workshops  Look Book  Meet and Greet
  16. 16. © John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015 Facilitated Mentoring Process or “How we did it” Kickoff  Special event, offsite  VP welcome lunch  Speed Dating  Mentor and Mentee selection  Pairing  Partnership Launch
  17. 17. © John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015 Facilitated Mentoring Process or “How we did it” Support  “The Mentor’s Guide” &“The Mentee’s Guide” Workbooks  Three Month Check-Ins  Check-In calls  “Finish Strong” strategies and meeting with three months to go  Reading list and resource sharing
  18. 18. © John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015
  19. 19. © John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015 Facilitated Mentoring Process or “How we did it” Wrap Up “Tie a Bow Around it”  Evaluation conversations – no happy sheets – and report to company  Final Celebration Workshop and Party including  the Journey of the Mentor and Mentee  Success Stories  Pay it Forward  Circling back with VP’s
  20. 20. © John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015 Facilitated Mentoring Process or “How we did it” Reinforce The Value Proposition, continued  Prior participants present the program to incoming  Incorporate feedback from each year’s participants to ‘sell’ what’s needed  Invite VPs to be Mentors  Invite VPs to the Briefing sessions each year
  21. 21. © John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015 The Challenge of Measurement and Evaluation Key: Be willing to truly debate Measurement and Evaluation  Why you are doing it?  What do you want to do with the results?  What measures are valid?  Can one particular development initiative in isolation predict or be causal to an employees’ success?
  22. 22. © John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015 How we knew we were CREATING A MENTORING CULTURE  100% VP (stakeholder) participation:  As Mentors  Proactively nominate team members throughout the year  Three VPs initiated a mentoring process within their own team’s while fully participating in this one  During a substantial business downturn including two large layoff processes this program was labeled a ‘do not touch’ with no budget cuts.  Other supportive programs started: Mentoring Circles, Internal Internships, and Executive Shadowing  Mentees sought to Mentor in the program as soon as they eligible  Another company division has adopted the same process  Participants labeled the experience as the most significant development experience of their entire careers
  23. 23. © John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015 Summary  Mentoring happens everyday  Facilitate it for organizational benefit  Take baby steps: piloting and stakeholder engagement
  24. 24. © John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015 Contacts John P. Sjovall Jr e: jsjovalljr@gmail.com c: (203) 313-0234 Valerie Smith Pease 535 Raymond Drive West Chester, PA 19380 e: valerie@valeriesmithconsulting.com w: (484) 999-8279 c: (610) 246-8821
  25. 25. © John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015 Your Feedback Is Important Please take a moment to complete the workshop evaluation located in the mobile app. L-TEN looks to your feedback to help improve the program each year. - Open the mobile app - Click on agenda - Select the session you are evaluating - Select the rate and review button If you do not want to complete the evaluation in the mobile app, you may collect a hard copy form at the registration desk. 4
  26. 26. © John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015 Appendix & References
  27. 27. © John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015 Selector
  28. 28. © John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015 How you know you are CREATING A MENTORING CULTURE  100% Stakeholder participation:  As Mentors  Proactively nominate team members  Stakeholders initiate mentoring process within their own organizations in addition to fully supporting organizational program  Other parts of the organization or divisions adopt similar programs  Program labeled a ‘do not touch’ with no budget cuts.  Mentors actively seek senior stakeholder mentoring on their own  Mentees seek to Mentor in the program as soon as they eligible  Participants labeled the experience as the most significant development experience of their entire careers  Other supportive programs start to establish, such as: Mentoring Circles, Internal Internships, and Executive Shadowing  “Pay it Forward” activities start to exponentially increase
  29. 29. © John Sjovall and Valerie Smith Pease, 2015

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