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Priestly Generationsin DialogueArchdiocese of New OrleansAugust 2012 ConvocationDominic PerriFr. Stephen Fichter
We have been able to use a model of priestlygenerations (cohorts) to help us better understanddifferent generations within...
Brief Introduction to Cohort-Generational ModelsExplore what happens whendifferent generations interactApply generational ...
The dates for the generations(cohorts) are not hard/fastThe key piece is the sharedexperienceIf you feel you identify with...
A generation’s unique identity isshaped by the significant events andpeople that influenced them duringtheir formative yea...
Vatican II (1962-1965)Key Question – When did your seminaryformation take place with respect toVatican II?
Created 4 priestly ordinationcohorts1. Pre-Vatican II (ordained before  1964)2. Vatican II (ordained 1964 to 1977)3. Post-...
Ordained by 1964 (midpoint of Council)  Already formed before Vatican II  At least 72 years old (average 80+)  25% of thos...
Ordained between 1964 and1977  Formed during turbulent years  Age 59-71 (majority in their 60s)  33% of those in our 2009 ...
Ordained between1978 and1991  Ordained in first half of JPII’s service  Age: 45- 58 (some are even older)  Many entered se...
Ordained in1992 or later  Often called John Paul II priests  Age 24 and 44 (again, some are older)  18% of those in our 20...
The End
Priestly generations in dialogue
Priestly generations in dialogue
Priestly generations in dialogue
Priestly generations in dialogue
Priestly generations in dialogue
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Priestly generations in dialogue

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Brief Introduction to Cohort-Generational Models and 4-generation model of US priesthood.

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  • DIAPOSITIVAS DE COORDENADAS GEOGRAFICAS EN ESPAÑOL
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Priestly generations in dialogue

  1. Priestly Generationsin DialogueArchdiocese of New OrleansAugust 2012 ConvocationDominic PerriFr. Stephen Fichter
  2. We have been able to use a model of priestlygenerations (cohorts) to help us better understanddifferent generations within the presbyterate.We have come to a new understanding and respectfor the differences that exist among the differentpriestly generations in the presbyterate.We have conducted our conversations in a spirit ofmutual respect in which all feel they have beenheard and their experiences have been honored.
  3. Brief Introduction to Cohort-Generational ModelsExplore what happens whendifferent generations interactApply generational thinking toChurch and ministryWill begin with a 4-generationmodel of US historyFollowed by 4-generation modelof US priesthoodNot clear how well this appliesto non-US populations. Notenough research available
  4. The dates for the generations(cohorts) are not hard/fastThe key piece is the sharedexperienceIf you feel you identify with theexperience of a generation, youprobably belong there
  5. A generation’s unique identity isshaped by the significant events andpeople that influenced them duringtheir formative yearsEach generation is heavily influencedby the experience of the previousgenerations
  6. Vatican II (1962-1965)Key Question – When did your seminaryformation take place with respect toVatican II?
  7. Created 4 priestly ordinationcohorts1. Pre-Vatican II (ordained before 1964)2. Vatican II (ordained 1964 to 1977)3. Post-Vatican II (ordained 1978 to 1991)4. Millennial (ordained 1992 to present)
  8. Ordained by 1964 (midpoint of Council) Already formed before Vatican II At least 72 years old (average 80+) 25% of those in our 2009 studyCharacteristics: Attracted to Institutional Church Identify strongly with Church structures Becoming a priest was often a matter of pride for family and community
  9. Ordained between 1964 and1977 Formed during turbulent years Age 59-71 (majority in their 60s) 33% of those in our 2009 studyCharacteristics: Questioned institutions and structures Rebelled against and tried to reform what they saw as overly clerical culture Focus on building community
  10. Ordained between1978 and1991 Ordained in first half of JPII’s service Age: 45- 58 (some are even older) Many entered seminary after college 23% of those in our 2009 studyCharacteristics: Most were children during Council By the time they arrived in seminary, ideas of Council were in place
  11. Ordained in1992 or later Often called John Paul II priests Age 24 and 44 (again, some are older) 18% of those in our 2009 studyCharacteristics: Raised when Church was in decline (schools, hospitals, religious orders) Wear collar as a witness; more likely to see themselves as “men set apart”
  12. The End

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