Quit beating the bush for volunteers- Volunteer Alberta CSGVP PPT

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Volunteer Alberta's presentation of the Alberta-specific statistics from the 2007 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating (CSGVP). Visit www.volunteeralberta.ab.ca to book a presentation today!

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  • International Classification of Nonprofit Organizations table in the John Hopkins University’s study of Canadian nonprofits
  • HIGHLIGHT: The CSGVP was developed through a unique blend of federal government departments, nonprofit and voluntary organizations led by Statistics Canada and Imagine Canada, and in partnership with Volunteer Canada, Canadian Heritage, Health Canada, Human Resources Development Canada, and the Kahanoff Foundation. PRESENTERS’ NOTES: The 2007 CSGVP is the largest study ever undertaken that provides information on how Canadians: donate money and in-kind gifts to charitable and nonprofit organizations; volunteer time to charitable and nonprofit organizations; and Provide direct help to others. History: In 1987, Statistics Canada conducted a Survey of Volunteer Activity to assess volunteer participation. The 1997 NSGVP was conducted as a special survey and posed many of the same questions, enabling comparisons to be made between 1987 and 1997 findings. The Survey was redone in 2000 as part of the federal government's Voluntary Sector Initiative. The NSGVP provided a comprehensive look at the ways in which Canadians support one another and their communities. In 2001, the federal government funded a permanent survey program on charitable giving, volunteering and participating within Statistics Canada. The survey was renamed the Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating (CSGVP) to distinguish it from surveys in other countries The CSGVP format, approach and questions differ from previous iterations of the survey. Therefore, survey results cannot be compared to previous results. Results from the 2007 CSGVP should be considered the new “benchmarks” of giving, volunteering and participating in Canada. REFERENCES: Pages 5-6, Caring Canadians, Involved Canadians: Highlights from the 2007 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating
  • PRESENTERS’ NOTES: Canadians donate their time and money, help their neighbours, and connect with each other in their communities by belonging to organizations, groups or associations. 84% Canadians donated 23 million 46% Canadians volunteered 12.5 million 84% Canadians helped others directly REFERENCES: Page 57, Caring Canadians, Involved Canadians: Highlights from the 2007 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating
  • PRESENTERS’ NOTES: The numbers relating to « volunteering in Canada » refer to the extent to which Canadians (15 years and older) volunteered through an organization over the course of one year. 12.5 million Canadians volunteered (46% of the population aged 15 and older) during the one-year period preceding the survey. Just over 2.1 billion hours volunteered, equivalent to almost 1.1 million full-time jobs. The average contribution per volunteer is of 166 hours over the course of one year. REFERENCES: Page 36, Caring Canadians, Involved Canadians: Highlights from the 2007 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating
  • PRESENTERS’ NOTES: Variations in provincial and territorial volunteering rates and hours: Given the social and economic differences among Canada’s provinces and territories, it is not surprising to find variations in volunteer rates and hours. Saskatchewan has the highest volunteer rate (59%), followed by the Yukon (58%) and the Prince Edward Island (56%). The lowest volunteer rate was found in Québec, where 37% volunteered in 2007. There was a statistically significant difference between 2004 and 2007 in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland & Labrador. NOTE: It is difficult to pinpoint specific reasons for the variation in data among the provinces and territories. There are many factors that contribute to the results and need to be considered – from average household incomes to education levels, religious affiliations and the average age of the population. It is important to note that there are many ways of supporting communities and each other. Some provinces may have higher rates in some areas of support but lower rates in others. When you only look at the lower rate, you don’t get the whole picture. For example, Nunavut has one of the lowest donor rates in the country, but the highest rates of helping each other directly. REFLECTION: On average, Canadian volunteers contribute 166 hours per year. This is the equivalent of just over three hours per week or 14 hours per month. How does this compare to the average number of hours contributed by volunteers in your organization? What does this mean in terms of establishing new or revising current position descriptions? Does it change the commitment expected from volunteers? REFERENCES: Page 46, Caring Canadians, Involved Canadians: Highlights from the 2007 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating
  • • Organizations need to be aware of the nature of their volunteer base - Narrow but highly committed, with volunteers providing large numbers of hours? - Broad, but less committed? - Implications for many other aspects of volunteering • Also need to understand the role of their cause relative to volunteering generally
  • Implications: Albertans more likely to volunteer than residents of half the other provinces • Report higher average hours than national average
  • Females volunteer more but males volunteer more hours
  • HIGHLIGHT: A few contribute the most. We often hear “if you want something to get done, ask the busiest person around.” This 2007 CSGVP confirms the trend that a little does a lot! Only 25% of Canadians provided 78% of all volunteer hours. Volunteer Canada Key Message: The study shows that while Canadians make an enormous contribution (almost 12.5 million Canadians volunteered their time in 2007 to charities or organizations and contributed close to 2.1 billion volunteer hours, an average of 166 hours in a year per volunteer), the vast majority of volunteer hours are contributed by a small group of Canadians. In terms of the whole Canadian population, only 25% of Canadians contributed 78% of all volunteer hours. In short, the bulk of support comes from a narrow segment of the population and provides a very thin base of support for charitable and non-profit organizations. This was an increase from 11% who contributed 77% in the 2004 data set. The volunteers who contribute the bulk of hours are referred to in the CSGVP as “top volunteers”. The 25% of Canadians who are classified as Top Volunteers are broadly distributed throughout the population. Here is what we know about them from the CSGVP: Those who are religiously active and those who have university degrees are much more likely than others to be « top volunteers » Compared to all Canadians, those who attend religious services weekly are more likely to be top volunteers (23% were top volunteers compared to 9% of all Canadians) 17% of individuals with a university degree were top volunteers In contrast, top volunteers are least likely to be found among those with only pre-school aged children in the household (7% were top volunteers), those who have not graduated from high school (6%) and those with a household income of less than $20,000 (8%) A top-volunteer in 2007 is not much different from a top-volunteer in 2004. Beyond examining the motivation of « top volunteers » or their characteristics in order to recruit more « of the same », it is important to consider other statistics from the Survey and make some connections: 13% of those aged 45-64 are top volunteers (those aged 65 and up were at 12%) The average number of hours volunteered generally increases with age (from 138 hours a year for youth to 218 hours for seniors). In 2004 seniors volunteered 245 hours. REFERENCES: Pages 41-42, Caring Canadians, Involved Canadians: Highlights from the 2007 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating
  • SUPER-VOLUNTEERS : Those who have been contributing a great amount of time to the sector are often referred to as “super-volunteers.” Today’s “super” volunteers (mostly the post WWII cohort, now in their late 70s or 80s) – those who do the majority of all the volunteer work in Canada (most hours) – are beginning to reach their limits. What can we, as a voluntary sector, do to enrich and diversify the supply of volunteers? BABY BOOMERS : While baby boomers represent a significant pool of highly skilled, capable and active people, they are a different cohort with different expectations. Now on the brink of retirement, they are potentially positioned to fill Canada’s volunteer ranks. But this group is different from their predecessors - they are more demanding and are seeking opportunities for growth that are new and innovative, as well as looking for interesting and meaningful experiences. Note: Volunteer Canada’s resource entitled Volunteer Connections: New strategies for involving older adults outlines many volunteer management adaptations to consider attracting and retaining baby boomers as volunteers. An introductory workbook on ‘Baby Boomers – your new volunteers” is available from Volunteer Canada © 2009 BEYOND BOOMERS : It is important to plan beyond the involvement of boomers as volunteers. Consider the following: The super-volunteers are slowly moving out of volunteer activity. The boomers (we predict) are less likely to get involved at the same level as super-volunteers. Theoretically, the impact of this should be minimal since there are MORE boomers, but each is contributing fewer hours. However, once the boomers become the service recipients (when they are no longer involved as volunteers but need support from the community), who will be there to contribute volunteer time and energy? The reality is that the next generation (Generation X and younger) is not as large a cohort as the boomers. How can we engage them now in order to influence volunteer involvement behaviours in the longer term? How do you create positions to encourage cross-generational volunteering?
  • HIGHLIGHT: Results highlighting youth involvement in Canada dispels the myth of apathy often associated with teens. PRESENTERS’ NOTES: Volunteer Canada’s Key Message: The CSGVP paints a positive picture of Canadian youth involvement and dispels any myth of apathy amongst teens. Canadian teenagers between the ages of 15 and 19 are more likely than those in any other age group to volunteer (65%). Teens also support different causes than other volunteers and have different motivations for becoming involved. Youth, aged 15 to 24, have a higher rate of volunteering than any other age group Teenagers (15 to 19 yrs) are more likely than any other age group to volunteer (65% compared to 47% of 20 to 24 yr olds) However 20 to 24 year olds contributed more hours on average (182 per year compared to 116 per year for 15 to 19 year olds) REFERENCES: Page 51-52, Caring Canadians, Involved Canadians: Highlights from the 2007 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating
  • Young volunteers have different barriers in becoming involved than other young-Canadians have: 15-19 more likely dissatisfied with experience (13%) 20-24 more likely to not volunteer due to time (79%) REFERENCES: Page 51-52, Caring Canadians, Involved Canadians: Highlights from the 2007 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating
  • HIGHLIGHT: Mandatory community service is most prevalent among respondents aged 15 to 24 but not limited to this age group. Note: only 7% of all survey respondents indicate that they were required to contribute. PRESENTERS’ NOTES: Today, it is almost impossible to discuss youth and teen involvement in community without addressing the topic of mandated community service programs. This includes community service hours required to complete a high school diploma in some provinces and territories. The CSGVP includes mandatory community service in its estimates of volunteering. It is worth noting that the authors of the CSGVP recognize that such activities should not be considered within the concept of volunteering. Volunteer Canada has recently released a new series of publications on mandated community service and volunteerism. This may be of interest to the audience, particularly for discussions on teen involvement and the impact of mandated community service on their engagement patterns. It is important to note that the inclusion of mandated community service hours does not affect the overall outcomes of the survey results. Teen involvement is high, dispelling the myth that youth are not interested or involved in community of their own will. REFERENCES: Volunteering and Mandatory Community Service: each of the four resources in the series can be downloaded from Volunteer Canada’s online resource centre at www.volunteer.ca/resource. Use the key word “mandatory” for your search. Pages 49, Caring Canadians, Involved Canadians: Highlights from the 2007 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating
  • The likelihood of volunteering in later life appears to be linked to a number of early life experiences during one’s primary or secondary schooling. Those who had these prior life experiences were more likely than other Canadians to volunteer. Those who had prior life experiences were more likely to volunteer. Albertans more likely to volunteer if they had any of the youth experiences measured, over those who did not especially if they were active in student government or had parents who volunteered Albertans who were active in student government, belonged to a youth group or who had volunteered as a youth volunteered the most hours as adults HIGHLIGHT: The survey revelations emphasize our need to know who we want to engage as volunteers, determine if youth are part of this target group, and develop plans to effectively involve them. PRESENTERS’ NOTES: What does this mean to those who work to develop and strengthen volunteerism? The survey confirms the continued growth of involvement of youth – and in particular teens – in community. These results dispel the myth that youth are not involved or don’t want to be involved. Practitioners need to adopt and implement programs and practices that are youth and teen inclusive. Consider the following: DISPELLING THE MYTHS: Many factors influence youth engagement: information age, pop culture, globalization, broken homes, recession spending, political scandals, television warfare, better education, environmental awareness, organized religion, etc. MANDATORY COMMUNITY SERVICE – A GROWING TREND: The concept of community service programs has emerged and is often associated with youth engagement – mandatory community service programs, however structured, require people to get involved. Focusing on creating positive experiences that may lead to ongoing commitment and involvement is key. REFLECTION: Mandatory community service is a hot topic in Canada. The new series of resources (entitled Volunteering and Mandatory Community Service) developed by Volunteer Canada will help stimulate reflections and discussions. We encourage you to consult these resources and share them with your groups. REFERENCES: Page 41, Caring Canadians, Involved Canadians: Highlights from the 2007 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating
  • • 8% of volunteers stated that they were required to volunteer for the organization to which they contributed the most hours (decreased 3% from 2004) • Fewer volunteers reported in 2007 that their community service was mandatory (required by the organization they served) than in 2004 Implications: • Organizations should be aware of the role mandatory community service plays in their province - Generally fairly small • Note that topline figures are not universal - More important for many causes More important amongst many groups of potential volunteers
  • Volunteer Canada’s Key Message: CSGVP shows that the presence or absence of children in the household has a measurable effect on giving and volunteering in Canada. Canadians with school-aged children between the ages of 6 and 17 years were most likely to volunteer (62% of those with only school aged children volunteered, while 54% of those with both pre-school and school-aged children volunteered). While we often view parents with young children as the least likely to have time to volunteer, the CSGVP results show that the likelihood of volunteering generally increases with the presence of children, particularly school aged children (pre-school aged = 0 to 5 years; school aged = 6 to 17 years), in the household. Those who had only school aged children in the household were most likely to volunteer (67% volunteered), followed by those who had both pre-school and school aged children in the household (63% volunteered) Those with only pre-school aged children were least likely to volunteer (41%) However, those with no children volunteered the highest average number of hours (181), while those with pre-schoolers only volunteered the least (113 hours).
  • HIGHLIGHT: The correlation between volunteering and the presence of children in the household suggests a tendency to associate this form of volunteerism with mandatory community service. Yet, while involvement may be because of the children, it is not necessarily coerced. PRESENTERS’ NOTES: What does this mean to those who work to develop and strengthen volunteerism? The link between the presence of children in the household and volunteering generates thoughts from many angles including: the definition of volunteerism and the perceived obligation associated with parental involvement as volunteers, the opportunity parents have to model behaviour that could translate into involved children, and the notion of family volunteering and group involvement. DEFINITION OF COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT: The definition of volunteerism has evolved. Many activities done to support one another or our community have formalized and are now considered “volunteering”. As such, parental involvements in activities such as cooperative day-cares or parent teacher associations are considered volunteer activities and have been accounted for in this survey. Volunteer Canada’s resources on mandatory community service highlight a continuum of involvement, from mandated to altruistic engagement. Parental involvements such as these are included. We encourage you to refer to these for more information. MODELED BEHAVIOUR: As discussed in Volunteer Canada’s Family Volunteering: A Discussion Paper, research supports the common knowledge that children whose parents volunteer and participate are more likely to be volunteers as adults (Reed and Selbee, 2001; Jones, 2001). The impact of this modeling is clear, as we see that individuals who engaged in volunteering activity as a child or who observed their parents volunteering have a much higher probability of being a volunteer in their adult years. According to those studies, 49% volunteered if a parent had volunteered, compared with 29% if a parent had not.
  • In Alberta… Those who are employed are most likely to volunteer (56%), however those not in the labour force volunteered the most hours (176 annually). Those who were unemployed were the least likely to volunteer and also volunteered the least number of average hours.
  • HIGHLIGHT: Immigrants are slightly less likely to volunteer than native-born Canadians. PRESENTERS’ NOTES: Volunteer activity does not appear to be directly related to the length of time that immigrants have resided in Canada, although those who immigrated before 1971 tend to volunteer more hours than others (224 hrs vs. 163 hrs). The demographic characteristics of respondents are likely to play a role in their volunteering behaviours. For example, the average age of immigrants who arrived prior to 1967 was 64. This group exhibits volunteering patterns that are very similar to those of native-born Canadians 65 years of age and older (i.e. a somewhat lower volunteer rate than those slightly younger, but a higher average number of hours volunteered). REFERENCES: Pages 44-45, Caring Canadians, Involved Canadians: Highlights from the 2007 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating
  • Volunteer Alberta’s Intersections projects Types of organizations supported: 7% of immigrants volunteered with Sports and Recreation Organizations (vs. 13% of native-born Canadians) 8% volunteered for social services organizations (vs. 12%) More likely to volunteer for religious beliefs than native-born Canadians (34% vs. 20%)
  • HIGHLIGHT: In many cases, immigrants are engaged, without any targeted recruitment efforts, at times when they face the many challenges of starting a new life. Imagine what could be accomplished if we were to engage them actively at a stage when life has become “easier” for them. PRESENTERS’ NOTES: What does this mean to those who work to develop and strengthen volunteerism? The survey shows that immigrants are engaged in communities. While they may be unrepresented in some sectors (i.e. the sports and recreation sector), in general, immigrants to Canada are involved in all aspects of community. The key is to evaluate on a local level, as was discussed with families and youth volunteers, how much involvement of different “target” groups of volunteers is appropriate for your organization. For example, if you serve a community where 10% of the population has immigrated in the last 20 years, you may want to set a goal of ensuring 10% of your volunteer pool is made up of individual from these immigrant communities. It is important is to compare your group of volunteers to the community you serve, your organization’s mandate and your client group. Once you have determined your needs, you can focus on strategies for reaching your target group(s). Based on some of the findings, we may want to consider focusing our efforts on engaging retiree immigrants. This cohort of retirees is often well established with independent children. These individuals are ready to contribute to a community that has welcomed and supported them. Involving volunteers from all sectors of community at the leadership level, through service delivery efforts, in planning, and in implementing programs, can only enrich the quality of communities.
  • PRESENTERS’ NOTES: Non-volunteers were most likely to report time factors as barriers to volunteering. Over two thirds (68%) indicated that they did not volunteer because they did not have the time and 62% indicated that they were unable to make a long-term commitment. About half (53% reported giving money rather than time and 44% indicated that no one had asked them to volunteer. Around a quarter (27%) had health problems or physical disabilities that kept them from volunteering Relatively few identified financial costs associated with volunteering (18%) or dissatisfaction with previous volunteer experiences (8%) as barriers. REFERENCES: Pages 50-51, Caring Canadians, Involved Canadians: Highlights from the 2007 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating
  • No significant changes from 2004 to 2007 PRESENTERS’ NOTES: Volunteers were asked whether a number of possible reasons for volunteering were important to their decision to volunteer for the organization to which they contributed the most hours. Most agreed that the desire to make a contribution to their community was an important reason for their volunteering (93% nationally) In comparison to 2004, there has been little change in the reported motivations of volunteers REFERENCES: Page 48, Caring Canadians, Involved Canadians: Highlights from the 2007 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating • Provincial patterns are a general guideline only; considerable variation depending on the specific context - Most commonly reported motivations or barriers not necessarily the most important in any given context • Motivations and barriers experienced by volunteers change as their circumstances change • Always remember that motivations for volunteering do pertain to specific types of organizations • Few barrier shifts between volunteers and non-volunteers
  • PRESENTERS’ NOTES: One of the benefits of volunteering is the opportunity it provides volunteers to learn new skills Two thirds (66%) of volunteers reported that their volunteering had provided them with interpersonal skills, such as understand and motivating people or being better able to handle difficult situations. 34% indicated an increased knowledge about specific subjects like health, women’s or political issues, criminal justice, or the environment. A quarter obtained technical or office skills e.g. first aid, coaching, computer skills and bookkeeping. REFERENCES: Page 49, Caring Canadians, Involved Canadians: Highlights from the 2007 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating
  • IMPLICATIONS: • Need to be aware of how prevalent various volunteer activities are and, by extension, size of volunteer pool - Not recruiting solely for a cause – also recruiting for an activity - Related implications of underlying personal and economic characteristics, training overhead and length of involvement with organizations • Organizations should also consider which of their activities are not found in this list
  • PRESENTERS’ NOTES: Compared to 2004, there were no significant changes in the methods by which volunteers became involved with charitable or nonprofit organizations. Although less than half of volunteers became involved after approaching the organization on their own initiative (45%), these volunteers contributed more hours, on average (148 vs. 108), than others and contributed over half of all volunteer hours (53%) REFERENCES: Page 48, Caring Canadians, Involved Canadians: Highlights from the 2007 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating
  • PRESENTERS’ NOTES: Those who approached an organization on their own stated that they learned about the opportunity through these forms of mediums. But with such low percentages, and knowing that 48% volunteer because they were asked to volunteer, where should marketing funds be invested? (Database, recognizing past/current volunteers) REFERENCES: Page 48, Caring Canadians, Involved Canadians: Highlights from the 2007 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating
  • PRESENTERS’ NOTES: Canadians provide substantial help to others directly on their own without being involved in a formal organization or group. The CSGVP asked Canadians to indicate whether they had helped individuals, other than those living in their household, on their own over the previous year. This helping activity is sometimes referred to as informal volunteering . Approximately 84% of the population aged 15 and over had helped others directly, without involving an organization, at least once during the previous year (virtually unchanged from 2004 – 83%) 60% provided help in the home, such as cooking, cleaning, gardening, maintenance, painting, shoveling snow or car repairs; 53% provided health-related or personal care, such as emotional support, counseling, providing advice, visiting the elderly or unpaid babysitting; 47% helped by shopping, driving someone to the store or to other appointments; 29% helped with paperwork tasks such as writing letters, doing taxes, filling out forms, banking, paying bills or finding information; and, 16% provided unpaid teaching, coaching, tutoring, or assisting with reading. 25% provided help directly to someone in some other way REFLECTION: Should this kind of helping activity be documented separately from the volunteering data? Does the separation of these results affect your definition of volunteerism and volunteer development—and if so, how? Does it strengthen the concept of “formal” volunteerism? REFERENCES: Page 52-53, Caring Canadians, Involved Canadians: Highlights from the 2007 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating
  • PRESENTERS’ NOTES: Volunteer Canada Key Message: The CSGVP shows that giving, volunteering and participating behaviours are highly linked. People who volunteer are also more likely to donate, help others directly and participate by belonging to groups, associations and organizations. A full 69% of volunteers engaged in all three activities; 17% in two forms. A large majority (91%) of volunteer made financial donations (compared to 84% of Canadians), while 91% helped others directly (compared to 84% of Canadians). (*Volunteer Canada has identified key messages relating to the CSGVP results and volunteerism. Each of these messages is referenced throughout this presentation.) The CSGVP shows that volunteers are most likely to also donate, help others and participate by belonging to groups, associations and organizations. Volunteers are most likely to engage in other activities: 80% in three forms 91% of volunteers made financial donations compared to 85% of Canadians 91% helped others directly compared to 83% of Canadians REFLECTION: Volunteerism is one way to link with one’s community. Think about those currently involved with your organization. How many are engaged in more than one supportive capacity (giving, volunteering, participating)? Should we engage volunteers in diverse ways? How? As a board member, CEO or leader within the organization, what does this mean in terms of volunteer involvement? What connections can be made? REFERENCES: Pages 57-59, Caring Canadians, Involved Canadians: Highlights from the 2007 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating
  • Nonprofits use these patterns to better understand what levels of support are reasonable to expect from particular groups of donors Although those with higher income tend to make larger donations than others in absolute terms, they usually donate at a lower percentage of their total before tax household income when they do contribute. Household incomes of less than $20,000 donated an average of 1.6% of their pre-tax incomes, while those with household incomes of $100,000 or more contributed just 0.5% Albertans more likely to donate to health and hospital services organizations than residents of other provinces. Albertans most likely to donate to organizations working in the areas of health and hospitals, social services, and religion
  • Role of planning Those who make donation decisions in advance (amount or organization they will support) donate large amounts Those who donate to the same organizations from year to year donate disproportionately large amounts Alberta donors most likely to donate due to: -desire to help their community -desire to help a cause in which they believe -compassion towards those in need Less likely to be motivated by: -religious obligations or beliefs -tax credits from government -Slightly more likely than donors in other provinces to be motivated by tax credits in return donations Barriers to Donating More: • Albertan donors most likely to say they did not give more because: - Could not afford to give more - Happy with what they already gave
  • Alberta has one of the highest charitable tax credits in Canada. If donating $500, you are actually paying $300 because you get $200 back on your income taxes ($83 from the province and $117 from the nation) - get your biggest bang for the buck. * Total Annual Donations - When you make a charitable donation to a Canada Revenue Agency registered charity, you receive an official income tax receipt. You will receive a receipt for each individual donation you make. ** The charitable tax credit Is non-refundable, which means you must be a taxpayer to benefit from the tax credit. Don’t forget to use individual donations towards the Community Spirit Donation Matching Program. Visit www.culture.alberta.ca for more information.
  • (78%) of paid staff in Alberta work for large organizations (those with $1 million or more in annual revenues), even though these organizations account for just over 6%* of organizations. In contrast, the 43% of organizations with annual revenues less than $30,000 account for just 2% of total employment. Even though Hospitals, Universities and Colleges represent a tiny minority of organizations, they account for over one third (34%) of total employment in the $10 million or more category (8% of total employment for all organizations) i.e., Mostly the larger organizations are the ones who have more paid staff, the small grassroots organizations have less staff and may even be entirely volunteer-run.
  • The broader non-profit sector, which includes hospitals, universities and colleges, exceeded by more than one third the value added of the entire retail trade industry, and outpaced the value added of the mining, oil and gas extraction industry.
  • Organizations in social services, development and housing, culture and recreation, and religion groups when combined made up nearly two-thirds of core NPI economic activity in each of the eleven years. Note: The “other” category includes environment, law, advocacy and politics, international, and not elsewhere classified.
  • The fields of health and education account for a significant share of total sector revenues (about 60% in each of the eleven years), the bulk of which flows to hospitals, universities and colleges (55%). The remaining 40% of revenues span a broad spectrum of activities. The six primary activities— development and housing, culture and recreation, social services, business and professional associations, religion, and philanthropic intermediaries—consistently accounted for more than three-quarters of total revenue received by core non-profit institutions throughout the eleven-year period. P.22
  • Labour compensation forms the majority of operating expenses for hospitals, universities, and colleges. In 2007, compensation of employees accounted for 63.7%, more than twice this group’s purchases of goods and services used in the production process, also called intermediate purchases (29.9%). In contrast, organizations in the core non-profit sector spent more on intermediate purchases (50.8%) than on labour services (43.5%). However, core non-profit institutions benefit also from the bulk of volunteer effort, painting an entirely different portrait of this group when extending the value of labour services to include a value of volunteer work. The remaining 6% of operating expenses for each group is divided between capital consumption allowances (depreciation of fixed capital), and taxes less subsidies on factors of production. p.27
  • About Volunteer Alberta Provides support and networking opportunities to connect organizations in Alberta’s nonprofit/voluntary sector. Encourages the establishment of volunteer centres in Alberta. Provides networking and professional development opportunities to persons and organizations working in the nonprofit/voluntary sector. Works to raise awareness of the issues facing volunteers and the organizations they work in and strives to find support to remove these barriers. Acts as a clearinghouse for volunteer information and services, and provides access to resources including a volunteers-in-action Photo Gallery, best practices, HR benefits, volunteer management information, communication tools and more. Distributes Volunteer Alberta’s email newsletter Sector Connector on current trends, issues, news, events, and provincial and federal policies and initiatives affecting the voluntary sector. Connects with national organizations, including Volunteer Canada and CAVR (Canadian Administrators of Volunteer Resources), to provide Encourages participation in provincial and national programs such as National Volunteer Week (NVW) and International Volunteer Day (IVD), and provides funding to communities celebrating NVW through a partnership with the Wild Rose Foundation. Volunteer Alberta hosted the Alberta Network of the Canada Volunteerism Initiative (CVI) 2003-2007, and provides access to the wealth of knowledge created during this initiative. Volunteer Alberta’s mission: To create possibilities in Alberta’s voluntary sector by strategically connecting leaders, members, organizations and networks. Volunteer Alberta’s vision: Strong organizations effectively and strategically engaging individuals in their communities. Volunteer Alberta’s principles: Volunteer Alberta is collaborative, adaptable and has integrity. Volunteer Alberta’s goals are to ensure: Alberta’s communities have increased capacity to support volunteerism. Volunteer Alberta is a key voice for volunteerism in Alberta. Volunteer Alberta’s programs and services are progressive in meeting the needs of our members. A registered charity and nonprofit organization, Volunteer Alberta has been working with Alberta communities and volunteer centres since 1991.  
  • VA can provide access to resources, experience Here for you – a phone call away! ADVOCACY – BILL 1***** Information Networking Training Funding announcements Partnerships YOU ARE NOT ALONE!
  • 1st draw prize: $500.00 to a Alberta nonprofit organization of your choice 2nd draw prize: $250.00 to a Alberta nonprofit organization of your choice 3rd draw prize: Registration to Vitalize 2010 in Edmonton June 10-12, 2010. Provided by Culture and Community Spirit
  • CSGVP Next Steps: The 2007 CSGVP is the largest study ever completed on how Canadians support one another and their communities Considerable concern about the possible loss of 2010 survey www.givingandvolunteering.ca PRESENTERS’ NOTES: The 2007 CSGVP is the largest study ever completed on how Canadians support one another and their communities. Imagine Canada (www.imaginecanada.ca) has taken the lead on sharing the results from the survey throughout the country. In the past, specific fact sheets have been created to address specific highlights of survey results. While these have not yet been developed and funding still needs to be secured to produce these, we encourage you to visit www.givingandvolunteering.ca regularly for more information on the survey and related resources. As well, we encourage you to consult www.nonprofitscan.ca for a listing of research and resources for the voluntary sector. For more information and to access resources, visit www.volunteeralberta.ab.ca or contact the friendly staff at Volunteer Alberta. Thank you for coming to learn about Volunteer Alberta and Alberta’s Nonprofit/Voluntary Sector. We hope that you have found this presentation informative and useful. Questions?
  • Quit beating the bush for volunteers- Volunteer Alberta CSGVP PPT

    1. 1. Quit beating the bush for volunteers The Twelve Legs we Stand on www.volunteeralberta.ab.ca
    2. 2. Content <ul><li>The 12 legs of the nonprofit/voluntary sector (NPVS) </li></ul><ul><li>CSGVP </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Volunteers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Donors </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Employees </li></ul><ul><li>GDP Impact </li></ul><ul><li>NPVS Revenues </li></ul><ul><li>About Volunteer Alberta </li></ul>The Twelve Legs we Stand on
    3. 3. Diversity of Nonprofit/voluntary sector <ul><li>Culture and Recreations </li></ul><ul><li>Education and Research </li></ul><ul><li>Health </li></ul><ul><li>Social Services </li></ul><ul><li>Environment </li></ul><ul><li>Development and Housing </li></ul><ul><li>Civic and Advocacy </li></ul><ul><li>Philanthropic Intermediaries </li></ul><ul><li>International </li></ul><ul><li>Religious Congregations </li></ul><ul><li>Business and Professional Unions </li></ul><ul><li>Not Elsewhere Classified (n.e.c.) </li></ul>The Twelve Legs we Stand on International Classification of Nonprofit Organizations table in the John Hopkins University’s study of Canadian nonprofits
    4. 4. Alberta’s Nonprofit/voluntary organizations <ul><li>19,000 organizations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>12% of Canada’s 161,000 nonprofit/voluntary organizations </li></ul></ul><ul><li>58% of the 19,000 are completely volunteer run (no paid staff!) </li></ul>The Twelve Legs we Stand on Regional Highlights of the National Survey of Nonprofit and Voluntary Organizations, 2006
    5. 5. The Twelve Legs we Stand on Statistics Canada Statistique Canada Canadian Heritage Patrimoine canadien Health Canada Sant é Canada Human Resources and Ressources humaines et Skills Development Canada Développement des compétences Canada Publuc Health Agency Agence de santé publique Of Canada du Canada Highlights and Implications of the 2007 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating
    6. 6. The Twelve Legs we Stand on The CSGVP <ul><li>• The 2007 CSGVP is the most recent national study that provides detailed information on how Canadians support each another and their communities </li></ul><ul><li>CSGVP History and Evolution </li></ul><ul><li>1987 – Survey of Volunteer Activity </li></ul><ul><li>1997 – NSGVP </li></ul><ul><li>2000 – NSGVP </li></ul><ul><li>2004 – CSGVP, released 2006 </li></ul><ul><li>2007 – CSGVP, released June 8, 2009 </li></ul>
    7. 7. The Twelve Legs we Stand on A Good News Survey
    8. 8. The Twelve Legs we Stand on Volunteering in Canada
    9. 9. Volunteering in Alberta <ul><ul><li>52% of Albertans aged 15 and over volunteered in 2007 (increase of 4% from 2004) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>46% of Canadians volunteered (increase of 1%) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Alberta volunteers each contributed an average of 172 hours </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Canadians as a whole volunteered an average of 166 hours per year </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Albertans collectively volunteered 27 million hours annually </li></ul></ul>The Twelve Legs we Stand on A Portrait of Canadian Volunteerism: Highlights and Implications of the 2007 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating
    10. 10. The Twelve Legs we Stand on Provincial and Territorial Variations
    11. 11. Types of Organizations Supported <ul><li>Alberta residents most likely to volunteer for organizations working in the areas of: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Education and research </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Social services </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sports and recreation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Religion </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Somewhat more likely to volunteer for Education and research organizations than residents of other provinces </li></ul><ul><li>Widespread support does not necessarily mean volunteers contribute many volunteer hours </li></ul><ul><li>No major shifts from 2004 to 2007 </li></ul>The Twelve Legs we Stand on
    12. 12. Average Hours Volunteered The Twelve Legs we Stand on
    13. 13. Who is More Likely to Volunteer in Alberta? <ul><ul><li>Groups that volunteer the largest numbers of hours: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Aged 45 - 54 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Female </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Married or in a common-law relationship </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Not in the labour force </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Annual household income of $100,000 or more </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Attend religious services on a weekly basis </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Again, although these characteristics are treated separately, many tend to be related </li></ul></ul>The Twelve Legs we Stand on A Portrait of Canadian Volunteerism: Highlights and Implications of the 2007 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating
    14. 14. Who is More Likely to Volunteer? Gender The Twelve Legs we Stand on
    15. 15. Who is More Likely to Volunteer? Education The Twelve Legs we Stand on
    16. 16. Who is More Likely to Volunteer? Marital Status The Twelve Legs we Stand on
    17. 17. Who is More Likely to Volunteer in Alberta? Household income The Twelve Legs we Stand on A Portrait of Canadian Volunteerism: Highlights and Implications of the 2007 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating
    18. 18. Who is More Likely to Volunteer? Religious Attendance The Twelve Legs we Stand on
    19. 19. The Twelve Legs we Stand on A Few Contribute the Most in Canada <ul><li>25% of all volunteers provided 78% of all volunteer hours (compared to 11% contributing 77% of hours) </li></ul><ul><li>“ Top Volunteers” are: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>More likely to be religiously active </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>More likely to have a university degrees </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Less likely to have only pre-school aged children in their household </li></ul></ul><ul><li>13% of those aged 45-64 are top volunteers (and the average number of hours volunteered increases with age) </li></ul>
    20. 20. The Twelve Legs we Stand on A Few Contribute the Most (cont’d) <ul><li>What does this mean to those who work to develop and strengthen volunteerism? </li></ul><ul><li>Super volunteers </li></ul><ul><li>Baby boomers </li></ul><ul><li>Beyond boomers </li></ul>
    21. 21. The Twelve Legs we Stand on Youth Involvement <ul><li>Youth, aged 15-24, have a higher rate of volunteering than any other age group </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Teenagers (15-19 years) are more likely to volunteer (65%) compared to 47% of 20 to 24 year olds </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>20-24 age group volunteered more hours on average (182 hours vs. 116 hours) </li></ul></ul>
    22. 22. Barriers to volunteering more in youth The Twelve Legs we Stand on
    23. 23. The Twelve Legs we Stand on Youth Involvement (cont’d) <ul><li>Mandatory community service common among young Canadians </li></ul><ul><li>Small number (13%) of teen and youth volunteers (15-24 year olds) were required to get involved </li></ul><ul><ul><li>61% of the 13% did so because school required it </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Overall, 7% of Canadians provided mandatory community service </li></ul><ul><ul><li>46% required by organization they volunteered for </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>32% required by school </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>6% required by employer </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>16% required by some other authority </li></ul></ul>
    24. 24. Youth Involvement (cont’d) <ul><li>Those who had prior life experiences were more likely to volunteer. Experiences include: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>active in student government (61% volunteered) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>one or more parents who did volunteer work in the community (58%) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>active in a religious organizations (56%) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>done some kind of volunteer work (55%) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Cont’d… </li></ul>The Twelve Legs we Stand on
    25. 25. The Twelve Legs we Stand on Mandatory community service in Alberta 2007 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating
    26. 26. Who is more likely to volunteer? Presence of Children The Twelve Legs we Stand on
    27. 27. The Twelve Legs we Stand on Children in the Household (cont’d) <ul><li>What does this mean to those who work to develop and strengthen volunteerism? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Definition of community involvement </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Modeled behaviour </li></ul></ul>
    28. 28. Who is More Likely to Volunteer? Labour Force Status The Twelve Legs we Stand on
    29. 29. The Twelve Legs we Stand on Rates of Volunteering Among Immigrants
    30. 30. Rates of Volunteering among Immigrants <ul><li>Less likely than native-born Canadians to volunteer (40% vs. 49%) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>But contributed more hours (171 hrs vs. 163) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>More likely to list barriers to not volunteering </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Did not know how to become involved (33% vs. 22% of Canadian-born non-volunteers) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Costs associated with volunteering was a barrier (23% vs. 15%) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Dissatisfied with a previous volunteer experience (11% vs. 7%) </li></ul></ul>The Twelve Legs we Stand on
    31. 31. The Twelve Legs we Stand on Rates of Volunteering Among Immigrants <ul><li>What does this mean to those who work to develop and strengthen volunteerism? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Homogenous versus heterogeneous volunteer pool </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Importance of sustaining efforts to involve immigrants as volunteers </li></ul></ul>
    32. 32. Barriers to Volunteering in Canada The Twelve Legs we Stand on
    33. 33. Barriers in Volunteering in Alberta <ul><li>Albertans most likely to report as barriers to volunteering: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Lack of time (increased by 5% from 2004) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Inability to make a long term commitment to volunteering (increased by 3% from 2004) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Less likely to report as barriers: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Dissatisfaction with previous volunteering (increased by 2% from 2004) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Financial costs of volunteering (stable) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Volunteers more likely to report that they had given enough time already (stable) </li></ul><ul><li>Non-volunteers more likely to report that no one asked them to volunteer (increased by 6% from 2004) </li></ul>The Twelve Legs we Stand on
    34. 34. Motivations in Alberta <ul><li>Albertans most likely to be motivated to volunteer by desires to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Make a contribution to community (94%) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use their skills and experiences (77%) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Least likely to be motivated by: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Religious obligations and beliefs (23%) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Desire to improve job opportunities (22%) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Pattern of motivations extremely similar to that seen in other provinces </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Somewhat less likely to be motivated to use skills and experiences (77% vs. 78%) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>More likely to be motivated to explore own strengths (52% vs.59%) </li></ul></ul>The Twelve Legs we Stand on A Portrait of Canadian Volunteerism: Highlights and Implications of the 2007 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating
    35. 35. Benefits of Volunteering <ul><li>Learn new skills. Gained: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>68% interpersonal skills (66% nationally) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>46% communication skills (45% nationally) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>39% organizational skills (39% nationally) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>33% increased knowledge (34% nationally) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>38% gained fundraising skills (33% nationally) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>25% gained technical skills nationally </li></ul></ul>The Twelve Legs we Stand on
    36. 36. What Do Volunteers Do <ul><li>Alberta volunteers most likely to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Fundraise (48% vs. nationally 43%) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Organize or supervise events (47% vs. 45%) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Teach, educate or mentor (34% vs. Nationally 30%) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sit on committees or boards (33% both nationally and provincially) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Although there was a decrease in these activities from 2004 to 2007 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The greatest increase occurred in Conservation or environmental protection (4%) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Less likely than residents of other provinces to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Counsel or provide advice (26% vs. 28%) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Generally, the most common activities account for largest amounts of volunteer time </li></ul>The Twelve Legs we Stand on
    37. 37. How to Involve Volunteers <ul><li>48% asked to volunteer by someone </li></ul><ul><li>45% were approached by an organization to become involved </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Group contributed more hours on average (148 hours vs. 108 hours) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Contributed over half of volunteer hours </li></ul></ul>The Twelve Legs we Stand on
    38. 38. How to Involve Volunteers (cont’d) <ul><li>Those who approached an organization to volunteer learned about the opportunity through: </li></ul><ul><li>Responding to an advertisement (e.g. poster, newspaper) (14%) </li></ul><ul><li>Responding to a public appeal on TV or radio (3%) </li></ul><ul><li>Internet (3%) </li></ul><ul><li>Referral from another agency (2%) </li></ul>The Twelve Legs we Stand on
    39. 39. Volunteer Characteristics <ul><li>Implications: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Some groups volunteer disproportionately large amounts of time but this is less pronounced than with donations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>May be less of an issue of identifying ‘high yield’ segments and more of an issue of tuning recruitment, volunteer activities, etc. for particular population segments </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Patterns shown here are for volunteering generally – significant variations depending on the cause </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Useful to compare the characteristics and contributions of your volunteers with the patterns presented here </li></ul></ul>The Twelve Legs we Stand on
    40. 40. <ul><li>Overall, Alberta helped others at a rate of 86% (vs. 81% in 2004, Canada’s average of 84% in 2007) </li></ul>The Twelve Legs we Stand on Helping Others
    41. 41. The Twelve Legs we Stand on Linked Behaviours <ul><li>Giving, volunteering and participating behaviours are linked </li></ul><ul><li>Those who volunteer are more likely to donate, help others directly and participate in organizations </li></ul><ul><li>80% of volunteers engaged in all three activities </li></ul><ul><ul><li>91% of volunteers made financial donations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>91% helped others directly </li></ul></ul>
    42. 42. Donating in Alberta <ul><li>85% of Albertans (approximately 2,986,300 people) made financial donations in 2007 (79% in 2004) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>84% of Canadians donated </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Average donation of $596 (19% increase from $500 in 2004) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Canadians donated on average $437 </li></ul></ul>The Twelve Legs we Stand on
    43. 43. Alberta’s Top Donors <ul><li>45 years and older </li></ul><ul><li>Were married or in a common-law relationship </li></ul><ul><li>Held a university degree </li></ul><ul><li>Had an annual household income of $100,000 or more </li></ul><ul><li>Had no children present in household </li></ul><ul><li>Attended religious services on a weekly basis </li></ul>The Twelve Legs we Stand on
    44. 44. Donation Methods <ul><li>More likely than residents of other provinces to donate by: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sponsoring someone in an event (33% vs. 31% in other provinces) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Door-to-door canvassing (29% vs. 27%) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In response to mail request (28% vs. 25%) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>At place of work (24% vs. 21%) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>No significant changes from 2004 </li></ul><ul><li>Largest percentage of donation value received through places of worship (46%) </li></ul><ul><li>Other lucrative donation sources include mail requests and paying to attend charity events </li></ul>The Twelve Legs we Stand on
    45. 45. Giving among Immigrants <ul><li>Slightly less likely to give to charities and nonprofits than those who were Canadian-born (82% vs. 85%) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>But gave more when donated ($505 vs. $423) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Giving increases with time spent in Canada </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Lowest rate in immigrants who came to Canada 1999 or later (72%); gave an average of $257 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Highest in immigrants who arrived before 1971 (89%); gave an average of $647 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Donate to same organizations as native-born Canadians but: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Donated less to health organizations (46% vs. 59%_ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Donated more to religious organizations (45% vs. 34%) </li></ul></ul>The Twelve Legs we Stand on
    46. 46. Increase your donations The Twelve Legs we Stand on * Total Annual Donations - When you make a charitable donation to a Canada Revenue Agency registered charity, you receive an official income tax receipt. You will receive a receipt for each individual donation you make. ** The charitable tax credit is non-refundable, which means you must be a taxpayer to benefit from the tax credit. http://culture.alberta.ca/communityspirit/taxcredit.aspx Total Annual Donations*     Alberta     Federal Total Tax Credit** $500   $83   $117 $200 $1,000   $188   $262 $450 $2,000   $398   $552 $950 $5,000   $1,028   $1,422 $2,450 $10,000   $2,078   $2,872 $4,950 $25,000   $5,228 $7,222 $12,450
    47. 47. Employees <ul><li>42% of nonprofit/voluntary organizations have employees </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Approximately 176,000 employees </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>57% work full time (100,000) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>43% work part time (76,000) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>But… </li></ul></ul>The Twelve Legs we Stand on Regional Highlights of the National Survey of Nonprofit and Voluntary Organizations, 2006
    48. 48. Unbalanced seesaw The Twelve Legs we Stand on Regional Highlights of the National Survey of Nonprofit and Voluntary Organizations, 2006
    49. 49. Canadian nonprofit/voluntary labour force <ul><li>74% of employees in the sector are women; more than in quasi-government (66.5%) and for-profit organizations (47.5%) </li></ul><ul><li>39% of employees are over the age of 45 years; the nonprofit labour force is younger than in quasi-government organizations but older than in for-profit organizations </li></ul><ul><li>One-third of employees are in professional occupations; fewer than in quasi-government organizations but more than in for-profit organizations </li></ul><ul><li>Approximately 15% of employees are immigrants; similar to quasi government and lower than for-profit organizations </li></ul><ul><li>Nearly 40% of the sector's paid employees are union members or covered by collective agreements. </li></ul>The Twelve Legs we Stand on http://www.hrvs-rhsbc.ca/labour/statistics.cfm
    50. 50. GDP Impact <ul><li>In 2007, core nonprofit/voluntary sector amounted to $35.6 billion (2.5% of the total economy) </li></ul><ul><li>$100.7 billion including hospitals, universities and colleges (7% of Canadian economy) </li></ul>The Twelve Legs we Stand on P. 9, Satellite Account of Non-profit Institutions and Volunteering 2007, December 2009
    51. 51. Growth spurt? <ul><li>Core nonprofit grew 7.1% over 11 years </li></ul><ul><li>Canadian economy grew by 5.8% </li></ul><ul><li>Hospitals, universities and colleges grew at 6% </li></ul><ul><li>Core nonprofit activity nearly doubled between 1997 and 2007 </li></ul>The Twelve Legs we Stand on P.10, Satellite Account of Non-profit Institutions and Volunteering 2007, December 2009
    52. 52. So what? <ul><li>In 2006, core nonprofit (excluding contribution of volunteers) GDP was: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>20% more than the ENTIRE accommodation and food services industry </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2.5 times agriculture industry </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>6 times as much value added as motor vehicle manufacturing industry </li></ul></ul>The Twelve Legs we Stand on P.10, Satellite Account of Non-profit Institutions and Volunteering 2007, December 2009
    53. 53. The Twelve Legs we Stand on P.11, Satellite Account of Non-profit Institutions and Volunteering 2007, December 2009
    54. 54. Which subsector had the most GDP impact? The Twelve Legs we Stand on P.13, Satellite Account of Non-profit Institutions and Volunteering 2007, December 2009
    55. 55. Distribution of Revenue The Twelve Legs we Stand on P.23, Satellite Account of Non-profit Institutions and Volunteering 2007, December 2009
    56. 56. Nonprofit Revenue Diversity The Twelve Legs we Stand on P.19, Satellite Account of Non-profit Institutions and Volunteering 2007, December 2009
    57. 57. Nonprofit Expenses in 2007 The Twelve Legs we Stand on
    58. 58. The Twelve Legs we Stand on About Volunteer Alberta <ul><li>Support & networking opportunities </li></ul><ul><li>Establishment of volunteer centres </li></ul><ul><li>Connecting to volunteer-engaging organizations </li></ul><ul><li>Professional Development </li></ul><ul><li>Awareness of issues facing volunteers </li></ul><ul><li>Access to information and resources </li></ul><ul><li>Removing barriers to volunteerism </li></ul>
    59. 59. Online Resources – Five for Free The Twelve Legs we Stand on Projects funded by Alberta Law Foundation, the Muttart Foundation, The Co-operators, Alberta Voluntary Sector Insurance Council, Insurance Bureau of Canada, and Government of Alberta
    60. 60. The Twelve Legs we Stand on Support the sector by purchasing a Volunteer Alberta Membership Online!
    61. 61. Count yourself in! <ul><li>52% of Albertans volunteer… </li></ul><ul><li>Are you one of them? </li></ul><ul><li>Volunteer any time between April 18-24 and submit your total number of hours on the Volunteer Alberta website: www.volunteeralberta.ab.ca </li></ul><ul><li>What's in it for you and your volunteers? </li></ul>International Classification of Nonprofit Organizations table in the John Hopkins University’s study of Canadian nonprofits
    62. 62. Volunteer Alberta can provide access to resources & experience Toll Free (877) 915-6336 Phone (780) 482-3300 Email [email_address] The Twelve Legs we Stand on www.volunteeralberta.ab.ca

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