Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Research process

719 views

Published on

Steps in the research process. Modified from the original presentation by Melissa Clark, Information Services Librarian.

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Research process

  1. 1. RESEARCH PROCESS Originally Prepared for Research for Creative Writing I By Melissa Clark, Information Services Librarian
  2. 2. The Research Process Ask a Question Brainstorm Background Information Search Evaluate Results
  3. 3. Ask a Question Research starts with Curiosity What do you want to know? May start with a general question Ex. What would life have been like for a young woman immigrating to New York from Ireland during the Great Famine?
  4. 4. Ask a Question Brainstorm Background Information Search Evaluate Results
  5. 5. Brainstorm Related Terms and Ideas Pick out the key ideas in your topic/question Try to think of synonyms or alternate phrasing List any related terms (broader/narrower) you can think of Ireland | Irish | Éire | Gaelic | County Cork, etc. Great Famine | Potato Famine | an Gorta Mór (“the Great Hunger”) | an Drochshaol (“the bad life”) New York | Ellis Island | Five Points Immigration | Emigration 1845 – 1852
  6. 6. Ask a Question Brainstorm Background Information Search Evaluate Results
  7. 7. Initial Search for Background Information Read for general information on your topic Identify gaps in your existing knowledge Narrow and focus your research Sources Encyclopedias and other Reference Books Skim a Book on the general topic Web Search
  8. 8. Ask a Question Brainstorm Background Information Search Evaluate Results
  9. 9. Define a Search Strategy Articulate what you need to know Determine where/how you are most likely to find it If you don’t know, ASK!
  10. 10. Types of Information Sources  Primary Sources Information in its original form when it first appears  Secondary Sources Restates, rearranges, examines, or interprets information from one or more primary sources  Tertiary Sources Leads you to secondary sources
  11. 11. Primary Sources  Has not been published anywhere else or put into a context, interpreted, filtered, condensed, or evaluated by anyone else  Examples A speech, lecture, or presentation Writing by the witnesses of an event, person, or place  Newspaper articles  A diary or journal  Letters, correspondence, or transcribed conversations Artwork, poetry, and other artistic expressions An original scientific study Historical documents or publications  The U.S. Constitution
  12. 12. Secondary Sources  Has been removed from its original source and repackaged  Examples Notes or summary of a speech, lecture, or presentation Book or journal article analyzing an historical person or event and attempting to put it in context Critic’s response to artwork, poetry, and other artistic expressions Encyclopedia article on a topic Newspaper article reporting on a scientific study published elsewhere  May also lead you to primary information Bibliography or index of primary sources
  13. 13. Tertiary Sources  Commonly used to identify and locate secondary sources  Examples Bibliography of critical works about a person, period, work, or other topic Index to secondary sources  Index to journal, magazine, or newspaper articles  Library catalog
  14. 14. Timeline of Primary and Secondary Sources
  15. 15. Where Do I Find… Primary Sources Library’s Catalog Library’s Databases  ARTstor Print Indexes Archives Historical Societies Manuscript Collections Museums Embedded in Secondary Sources Secondary Sources Library’s Catalog Library’s Databases PsychINFO ERIC MLA International Bibliography Print Indexes
  16. 16. Creative Writing Research Guide http://libguides.sdstate.edu/creativewriting
  17. 17. Ask a Question Brainstorm Background Information Search Evaluate Results
  18. 18. Evaluate Your Results Did you find an answer to your research question? Yes – Is the answer useful for your research project?  Fact vs. Opinion  Sufficient detail? No – Re-evaluate your search strategy and try something different
  19. 19. Repeat? Research is an iterative process Finding the answer to your initial question may raise new, more interesting questions Ask a Question Brainstorm Background Information Search Evaluate Results
  20. 20. Ask a Question Original Question What would life have been like for a young woman immigrating to New York from Ireland during the Great Famine? Focus and Narrow What would have been popular or common knowledge? Stories and Tales Flowers Clothes Occupations

×