Successfully reported this slideshow.

Users' Privacy Concerns About Wearables: Impact of form factor, sensors and type of data collected

710 views

Published on

Slides presented by Prof. Kelly Caine during the 1st Workshop on Wearable Security and Privacy (workshop co-located with Financial Crypto 2015).

Published in: Technology
  • Be the first to comment

Users' Privacy Concerns About Wearables: Impact of form factor, sensors and type of data collected

  1. 1. Users’  Privacy  Concerns  About   Wearables:  impact  of  form  factor,   sensors  and  type  of  data  collected   Kelly  Caine   Vivian  Genaro  Mo0  
  2. 2. Acknowledgements   Support:    NSF:  1314342     I’m  especially  thankful  to:   •  Vivian  Mo0   •  Jacob  Sorber   •  David  Kotz   •  Ryan  Halter   •  Amulet  team   •  hatlab  members   HATlab!
  3. 3. Human  Factors   •  Underexplored   –  Threats,  risks,  implicaRons  for  designers   •  Devise  beSer  soluRons  to   –  Ensure  users’  privacy   –  Ensure  privacy  of  those  around  wearer     –  By  understanding  their  perspecRves   6  
  4. 4. Methods   •  April  and  May  2014   •  38  devices   •  59  sources   –  15  forums   –  34  technical  websites   –  6  e-­‐commerce  websites   –  4  social  media  sites   •  E.g.,  Amazon,     •  BestBuy   •  ExpertReviews   •  Reddit   •  Slate   •  Wearable  CompuRng  Review  
  5. 5. Methods   •  >  2,000  comments     •  filtered  privacy-­‐related  comments   – 72  comments   •  Categorized  comments   – E.g.,  “locaRon  disclosure”  
  6. 6. Results  
  7. 7. Avoid   Avoid   listening   Avoid  using   device/ system   Censor  self   Hiding   SelecRve   Sharing   Control/ Modify   Be  careful   Alter  for   audience   Not  in  front   of  others   Quietly   Use  code  or   different   language   MiRgate/ Alleviate   Ask  to   remove   Ask  to  not   share   Check   Destroy   evidence   Limit   distribuRon   Be  Vague    
  8. 8. Implica=ons  /   Timeline   Prevent   Control   Mi=gate   Before   During   ADer   Loca=on   Disclosure   ✔   Social   ✔   ✔   ✔   Right  to  Forget   ✔   Discrete  Display   ✔   Access  Control   ✔   Users’  Fears   Wrist-­‐Worn  Devices  
  9. 9. Implica=ons  /   Timeline   Prevent   Control   Mi=gate   Before   During   ADer   Speech  Disclosure   ✔   Criminal  Abuse   ✔   Surrep==ous   Recording   ✔     Facial  Recogni=on   ✔     Social   ✔   Social  Media   Synchroniza=on   ✔   Visual  Occlusion   ✔   Head-­‐Worn  Devices  
  10. 10. Wrist-­‐Worn  Devices  
  11. 11. Right  to  forget     •  ‘it  gives  a  record  of  everything  you’ve  done,   day  in  and  day  out,  possibly  even  some  things   you  don’t  want  to  be  reminded  of’   16  
  12. 12. LocaRon  disclosure   •  ‘…  stalkers  know  where  you  are  at  all  .mes  of   the  day,  know  when  you  go  to  sleep,  riding  a   car,  or  climbing  a  mountain’  
  13. 13. Discreet  Display   •  ‘the  second  screen  will  act  as  sort  of  a  privacy   screen,  keeping  folks  from  reading  your  texts   by  glancing  at  your  wrist’  
  14. 14. Surveillance   •  ‘[wearable  devices  are]  the  NSA's  new  best   friend’  
  15. 15. Head-­‐Mounted  Displays  
  16. 16. Speech  Disclosure   •  ‘though  you  can’t  mind  people  overhearing   what  you  are  saying’  
  17. 17. Surrep==ous  Audio  and  Video   Recording   •  Social  norms  already  frown  on  making   surrep==ous  audio  recordings  (though  it  isn't   illegal,  it  is  done  only  infrequently  and  with  an   air  of  "secret  agency"  about  it);  video  is  much   more  of  an  intrusion.’  
  18. 18. Sousveillence   •  ‘There's  also  another  challenge  that  affects   not  only  those  who  wear  Glass,  but  everyone   else  around  privacy’  
  19. 19. Conclusion   •  privacy  concerns  are  related  to  type  of  sensors/ data   –  Cameras  and  microphones   –  GPS   –  Displays   •  Similar  to  mobile  privacy  concerns   –  ExcepRon  :  increasing  invisibility  of  wearables  
  20. 20. Invisibility  
  21. 21. Acknowledgments   •  This  material  is  based  upon  work  supported   by  the  NaRonal  Science  FoundaRon  under   Grant  No.  1314342.   I’m  especially  thankful  to:   •  Vivian  Mo0   •  Jacob  Sorber   •  David  Kotz   •  Ryan  Halter   •  Amulet  team   •  hatlab  members  
  22. 22. Want  to  Learn  More  about  Your   Users?  
  23. 23. Q&A  
  24. 24. references   •  Cho,  G.  (Ed.).  (2010).  Smart  clothing:  technology  and  applicaRons.  CRC  Press.   Taylor  &  Francis   •  Kai  Kunze,  Niels  Henze,  and  Koichi  Kise.  2014.  Wearable  compuRng  for  older   adults:  iniRal  insights  into  head-­‐mounted  display  usage.  In  Proceedings  of  the  2014   ACM  InternaRonal  Joint  Conference  on  Pervasive  and  Ubiquitous  CompuRng:   Adjunct  PublicaRon  (UbiComp  '14  Adjunct).  ACM,  New  York,  NY,  USA,  83-­‐86.   DOI=10.1145/2638728.2638747  hSp://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2638728.2638747   •  Ledger,  D.,  &  McCaffrey,  D.  (2014).  Inside  Wearables  How  the  Science  of  Human   Behavior  Change  Offers  the  Secret  to  Long-­‐Term  Engagement  (p.  18).  Endeavour   Research  Report.   •  Mo0,  V.  G.  &  Caine,  K.  E.  (2014).  Understanding  the  Wearability  of  Head-­‐mounted   Devices  from  a  Human-­‐Centered  PerspecRve.  Proceedings  of  the  InternaRonal   Symposium  on  Wearable  Computers  ISWC’14.   •  Mo0,  V.  G.  &  Caine,  K.  E.  (2014).  Human  Factors  ConsideraRons  in  the  Design  of   Wearable  Devices.  Proceedings  of  the  Human  Factors  and  Ergonomics  Society   2014  Annual  MeeRng.  Chicago,  IL:  Human  Factors  and  Ergonomics  Society.   •  Siewiorek,  D.,  Smailagic,  A.,  &  Starner,  T.  (2008).  ApplicaRon  Design  for  Wearable   CompuRng.  (M.  Satyanarayanan,  Ed.)  (p.  74).  Mor-­‐gan  &  Claypool.  

×