Visual Thinking andInformation Visualization Design           10/4 Week3
At any given instant, we apprehend only a tiny amount of theinformation in our surroundings, but it is usually just the ri...
The Door Study – change blindnesshttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FWSxSQsspiQ&feature=player_embedded
The Study – inattentional blindnesshttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IGQmdoK_ZfY
Daniel Simons
“The world is its own memory.”We see very little at any given instant, but we can sample anypart of our visual environment...
“Visual Thinking”Is a process that has the allocation of attention as its veryessence.Perception level -Cognitive level -S...
Visual thinking consists of a series of acts of attention, drivingeye movements and tuning our pattern-finding circuits.Th...
The apparatus and process of seeing
Brain pixels are concentrated in a central region called thefovea, whereas camera pixels are arranged in a uniform grid.  ...
Visual detail can only be seen via the fovea, at the very centerof the visual field. Our vision is so good in this region ...
The act of perception
Blind Spot
The act of perception is determined by two kinds of process:bottom-up, driven by the visual information in the pattern ofl...
What you see depends on both the information in the patternon the page as it is processed bottom-up through the variousneu...
Bottom-up
In the bottom-up viewinformation is successively selected and filtered so thatmeaningless low-level features in the first ...
The main feature processing stageoccurs after information arrives in the V1 cortex, havingtraveled up the optic nerve.    ...
At the intermediate level of the visual processing hierarchyfeature information is used to construct increasingly complexp...
At the top level of the hierarchyInformation has been reduced and distilled through the pattern-processing stage to a smal...
Visual working memoryThe reason why we can make do with only three or four objectsextracted from the blooming buzzing conf...
The greatly limited capacity of visual working memory is a majorbottleneck in cognition, and it is the reason why we must ...
Top-down
Retina image   Features   Patterns   Objects                                               p.12
Top-down attention causes a bias in favor of the signals we arelooking for.                                               ...
Perhaps the most important attentional process is the sequencing of eyemovements.Different tasks trigger variety of eye mo...
“just-in-time strategy”Generally, there was great economy in that objects were rarelylooked at unnecessarily; instead they...
Implications for design
If we understand the world through just-in-time visual queries,the goal of information design must be to design displays s...
Designed by Harry Beck
A map is perhaps the best example illustrating how graphicdesign can support a specific set of visual queries.• Which comb...
Nested loops
A useful way of describing the way the brain operates to solveproblems is as a set of nested loops.Outer loops deals with ...
p.18
Distributed cognition                 p.19
There is no central processing unit in the brain; rather the wholefunctions as a kind of distributed computer.Distributed ...
“The power of the unaided mind is highly overrated. Withoutexternal aids, memory, thought and reasoning are allconstrained...
Visualizations used to be mental images that people formedwhile they thought. Now the term more often means a graphicalrep...
Conclusion
Eye movements are executed to satisfy our need for informationand can be thought of as a sequence of visual queries on the...
One reason design is difficult is that the designer already has theknowledge expressed in the design, has seen it develop ...
W3 visual queries
W3 visual queries
W3 visual queries
W3 visual queries
W3 visual queries
W3 visual queries
W3 visual queries
W3 visual queries
W3 visual queries
W3 visual queries
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W3 visual queries

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W3 visual queries

  1. 1. Visual Thinking andInformation Visualization Design 10/4 Week3
  2. 2. At any given instant, we apprehend only a tiny amount of theinformation in our surroundings, but it is usually just the rightinformation to carry us through the task of the moment. p.1
  3. 3. The Door Study – change blindnesshttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FWSxSQsspiQ&feature=player_embedded
  4. 4. The Study – inattentional blindnesshttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IGQmdoK_ZfY
  5. 5. Daniel Simons
  6. 6. “The world is its own memory.”We see very little at any given instant, but we can sample anypart of our visual environment so rapidly with swift eyemovement, that we think we have all of it at once in ourconsciousness experience. We get what we need, when weneed it.It is much more efficient to have rapid access to the actualworld – to see only what we attend to and only attend to whatwe need. p.2
  7. 7. “Visual Thinking”Is a process that has the allocation of attention as its veryessence.Perception level -Cognitive level -Seeing is all about attention. p.3
  8. 8. Visual thinking consists of a series of acts of attention, drivingeye movements and tuning our pattern-finding circuits.These acts of attention are called visual queries.Understanding how visual queries work can make us betterdesigners. p.3
  9. 9. The apparatus and process of seeing
  10. 10. Brain pixels are concentrated in a central region called thefovea, whereas camera pixels are arranged in a uniform grid. p.5
  11. 11. Visual detail can only be seen via the fovea, at the very centerof the visual field. Our vision is so good in this region that eacheye can resolve about 100 points on the head of a pin held atarm’s length.At the edge of the visual field, vision is terrible; we can justresolve something the size of a human head. p.5-6
  12. 12. The act of perception
  13. 13. Blind Spot
  14. 14. The act of perception is determined by two kinds of process:bottom-up, driven by the visual information in the pattern oflight falling on the retina, and top-down, driven by thedemands of attention, which in turn are determined by theneeds of the tasks.The picture shown above is designed to demonstrate howtop-down attention can influence what you see and how. p.8
  15. 15. What you see depends on both the information in the patternon the page as it is processed bottom-up through the variousneural processing stages, and on the top-down effects ofattention that determines both where you look and what youpull put from the pattern on the page. p.9
  16. 16. Bottom-up
  17. 17. In the bottom-up viewinformation is successively selected and filtered so thatmeaningless low-level features in the first stage form intopatterns in the second stage, and meaningful objects in thethird stage. p.10
  18. 18. The main feature processing stageoccurs after information arrives in the V1 cortex, havingtraveled up the optic nerve. p.10
  19. 19. At the intermediate level of the visual processing hierarchyfeature information is used to construct increasingly complexpatterns. p.10-11
  20. 20. At the top level of the hierarchyInformation has been reduced and distilled through the pattern-processing stage to a small number of visual objects.The binding of visual information with nonvisual concepts andaction priming is central to what it means to perceive something. p.11
  21. 21. Visual working memoryThe reason why we can make do with only three or four objectsextracted from the blooming buzzing confusion of the world isthat these few objects are made up of exactly what we need tohelp us perform the task of the moment. p.11
  22. 22. The greatly limited capacity of visual working memory is a majorbottleneck in cognition, and it is the reason why we must oftenrely on external visual aids in the process of visual thinking.The real power of visual thinking rests in pattern finding. Oftento see a pattern is to find a solution to a problem. p.12
  23. 23. Top-down
  24. 24. Retina image Features Patterns Objects p.12
  25. 25. Top-down attention causes a bias in favor of the signals we arelooking for. p.13
  26. 26. Perhaps the most important attentional process is the sequencing of eyemovements.Different tasks trigger variety of eye movement patterns.
  27. 27. “just-in-time strategy”Generally, there was great economy in that objects were rarelylooked at unnecessarily; instead they were fixated using a “just-in-time strategy”.Occasional “longer-term look-aheads”, where people wouldglance at something they might need to use sometime in thenext movement of something. p.14
  28. 28. Implications for design
  29. 29. If we understand the world through just-in-time visual queries,the goal of information design must be to design displays so thatvisual queries are processed both rapidly and correctly forevery important cognitive task the display is intended tosupport. p.14
  30. 30. Designed by Harry Beck
  31. 31. A map is perhaps the best example illustrating how graphicdesign can support a specific set of visual queries.• Which combination of lines will get us to the pub?• Among potential routes, which is the shortest?• What are the transit station’s name?• How long will the trip take?• What is the distance between A and the nearest underground station?• How much it cost? p.14
  32. 32. Nested loops
  33. 33. A useful way of describing the way the brain operates to solveproblems is as a set of nested loops.Outer loops deals with generalities. Inner loops process thedetails. In the outer loop, the brain constructs a set of steps tosolve the problem and then executes them: p.17-18
  34. 34. p.18
  35. 35. Distributed cognition p.19
  36. 36. There is no central processing unit in the brain; rather the wholefunctions as a kind of distributed computer.Distributed cognition holds that cognition is the result of a set ofinterconnected processing modules, each doing somethingrelatively simple and sending signals on to other modules. p.19
  37. 37. “The power of the unaided mind is highly overrated. Withoutexternal aids, memory, thought and reasoning are allconstrained. But human intelligence is highly flexible andadaptive, superb at inventing procedures and objects thatovercome its own limits. The real powers come from devisingexternal aids that enhance cognitive activities. How have weincreased memory, thought and reasoning? By the invention ofexternal aids: it is things that make us smart.”—Don Norman p.20
  38. 38. Visualizations used to be mental images that people formedwhile they thought. Now the term more often means a graphicalrepresentation of some data or concepts. p.20
  39. 39. Conclusion
  40. 40. Eye movements are executed to satisfy our need for informationand can be thought of as a sequence of visual queries on thevisual world. p.21
  41. 41. One reason design is difficult is that the designer already has theknowledge expressed in the design, has seen it develop frominception, and therefore cannot see it with fresh eyes.Effective design should start with a visual task analysis,determine the set of visual queries to be supported by a design,and then use color, form, and space to efficiently serve thosequeries. p.21

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