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Lecture 5 - Colours and Materials - Commercial-Institutional Interiors VDIS10009

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Lecture 5 - Colours and Materials - Commercial-Institutional Interiors VDIS10009

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Lecture 5 - Colours and Materials - Commercial-Institutional Interiors VDIS10009

  1. 1. BY  RAMONA  SOLOMON     Lecture  5       Colours  &  Materials      
  2. 2.     Colour     “colours  present  themselves  in  con2nuous  flux,  constantly  related  to  changing   neighbours  and  changing  condi2ons”                                -­‐  Joseph  Albers  (painter  &  colour  theorist)      Colour  remains  one  of  the  most  challenging  and  conten>ous  aspects  of  interior  design.   The  applica>on  and  mixing  of  colour  has  long  been  an  intense  area  of  study  for  scien>st,   ar>sts   and   designers.   At   the   same   >me,   colour   can   be   an   extremely   subjec>ve   topic:   Everyone  has  their  favourite  colours  –  colours  that  remind  them  of  a  place  or  >me  or  that   have  specific  emo>ve  quali>es.     The  role  of  colour  in  interior  design  resists  dissemina>on  into  simple  rules  and  ideas,  and   yet  understanding  the  complexi>es  of  using  colour  in  space  is  fundamental  to  crea>ng  a   successful  interior.  Thus,  interior  designers  must  learn  the  characteris>cs  of  colour  and   how  it  can  act  as  a  focusing  and  organising  agent.  
  3. 3.     Colour  &  Material     The  role  of  colour  in  interior  design  is  further  complicated  by  its  associa>on  with  materials.   Materials  have  quali>es  of  absorp>on,  reflectance,  luminance  that  the  abstract  of  colour   do   not   take   into   account.   Materials   might   contain   many   layers   of   colour,   and   oPen   varia>ons   of   colour   can   occur   within   a   single   material   sample.   The   propor>onal   use   of   material  within  a  3-­‐dimen>onal  space  also  affects  how  colour  is  experienced.  Through  the   complex  interac>on  of  colour  and  material,  an  interior  designer  can  create  atmospheres  of   in>macy    or  freshness,  vibrancy  or  muteness,  and  even  begin  to  affect  other  senses  such   as  sight  and  hearing.     Colour  in  interior  design  can,  moreover,  can  be  divided  into  two  dis>nct  categories:  colour   as  applied  surface  and  colour  as  integral  to  a  material.  Paint,  lacquer,  specialty  finishes,   certain  laminates,  and  other  applica>ons  of  colour  to  the  finishes  surface  of  an  object  are   efficient  and  modifiable  strategies  for  colour  use.     There  are  many  instances  were  paint  and  applied  finishes  should  be  avoided,  however:   Adolf  Loos’s  saying  “Do  not  paint  concrete  grey,  or  wood  brown’  hold  true  here.  Materials   with  integral  colour  –  which  require  no  finish  other  than  a  sealer  –  have  greater  depth  of   surface,  which  allows  more  complex,  precise  colour  rela>onships  to  be  developed.    
  4. 4.     Colour  Scheme     Colour   schemes   are   the   result   of   turning   colour   combina>ons   into   a   set   of   rules   for   an   interior  paleYe.  Grounded  in  colour  theory,  the  designer  can  crea>vely  select  and  organise   colour  in  harmonious  combina>ons.  In  the  abstract  –  that  is,  when  colour  is  not  >ed  to  a   material   –   there   are   6   ‘classic’   combina>ons   of   colour:   monochroma>c,   analogous,   complementary,  split  complementary,  triadic  and  tetradic.  These  examples  below  use  a  full-­‐ satura>on  olour  wheel,  but  the  designer  can  vary  both  satura>on  and  brightness.  
  5. 5.     Applying  rules  of  contrast  to  an  interior  space     Contrast   is   considered   as   a   range   of   differences   between   the   compared   effects   of   colour  interac>on.     There  are  7  varia>ons  of  contrast:       1.  Contrast  of  Hue       2.  Light-­‐  Dark  Contrast         3.  Cold-­‐Warm  Contrast      
  6. 6.         4.  Complementary  Contrast         5.  Simultaneous  Contrast         6.  Contrast  of  Satura>on         7.  Contrast  of  Extension    
  7. 7.     Con$nual   connec$vity   through   technology   has   reinforced   our   basic   human   desire   to   connect   in   the   real   world.   Connect   with   the   earth   by   feeling   the   soil   between   our   fingers,  connect  with  ourselves  by  taking  $me  to  pause,  connect  with  our  heritage  by   relearning  forgo=en  skills,  connect  with  our  playful  side  by  indulging  in  colour.     How  will  you  explore  your  connec$on?       Watch  Video   hYps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iObV7VEK4W8      
  8. 8.    
  9. 9.    
  10. 10.     1:COLOURS     This   year   we’ll   be   seeing   a   diversity   of   colour   like   we   haven’t   seen   in   ages.   Our   aYen>on   is   has   seYled   gentle   colours   like   muted   pastels,   smoky  shades  of  grey,  soP  neutrals,  metal  hues,  rich  leather  and  marine   tones  along  with  at  the  opposite  end  of  the  spectrum  vibrant  jewel  and   fruit   colours.   Paint   colours   for   the   home   s>ll   revolve   around   sophis>cated  basics  with  preference  for  cleaner  whites,  smokier  neutrals   and   updated   muted   pastels.   Feature   walls   are   out,   zone   pain>ng   schemes  are  in  and  beige  is  a  thing  of  the  past.  
  11. 11.     2:FABRICS  AND  PATTERN       Prints   and   paYern   are   definitely   back   on   the   rise   –   visual   impact  is  the  key  theme.    On  one  side  we  see  fluid  looking   prints,   peacock   feather   paYerns,   photographic   images,   graded   dip   dye   designs,   text,   blurred   images,   florals   and   tropical   prints.       On   the   other   we   see   a   strong   geometric   designs,   3d   paYerns,   repeated   forms,   kaleidoscopic   images   and   paYerns   inspired   by   cells   and   molecules.   Fabrics   are   about  texture  be  it  visual  or  otherwise.  Velvet,  textures  and   raw   looking   weaves   are   popular   and   the   use   of   fabric   for   sofas  and  upholstery  is  back.  
  12. 12.     3:NATURAL  WORLD     Textures   derived   from   nature,   whether   they   are   animal,   mineral  or  vegetable  are  in.    Think  botany,  insect  prints,   fossils,   bone,   wood,   bark,   stone   and   organic   shapes.   We   are  tending  to  like  our  woods  looking  raw,  or  if  they  are   shiny   –   shown   in   a   way   that   we   can   really   appreciate   them.    We  want  materials  and  finishes  to  look  authen>c   and  we  are  using  them  in  more  simple  ways  in  order  to   appreciate   their   beauty.     Addi>onally   we   are   leaning   towards   steel,   copper,   pewter,   gold   and   other   metal   accents  in  preference  to  just  chrome  and  stainless  steel.  
  13. 13.     4:MATTE  FINISHES     The  popularity  of  maYe  finishes  is  growing  in  modern   décor  as  we  seek  to  add  differing  depths  of  interest  into   our   buildings   and   interiors.   A   maYe   finish   gives   an   object   a   raw,   edgy   look   and   also   allows   you   to   appreciate  the  overall  form  and  material  that  an  item  is   made  of.    This  principle  is  crucial  in  modern  design  and   it   also   harks   back   to   our   desire   for   natural   and   authen>c   soPer   finishes.   This   trend   is   growing   in   everything   from   tapware,   ligh>ng,   furniture,   accessories,  kitchens  and  bathrooms,  right  through  to   en>re  rooms.  
  14. 14.     5:INDUSTRIAL  DESIGN     Industrial  style  pieces  in  the  home  have  been  a  staple  in   the  past  few  years,  primarily  in  the  form  of  ligh>ng  and   furniture.   We   are   con>nuing   to   love   the   look   and   character  of  these  pieces.    The  approach  of  blending  the   purpose   of   an   item   and   a   considered   industrially   designed  form  is  set  to  make  its  way  into  other  items  of   a   more   prac>cal   nature   within   the   home.     There’s   a   move  towards  convenience,  func>onality  and  longevity   and   we   now   want   quality   from   items   that   are   mass-­‐ produced  to  go  along  with  character  in  our  homes.  
  15. 15.     6:ORGANIC  SHAPES     To   soPen   the   lines   of   our   crisper   and   cleaner   looking   modern  homes  we  are  adding  accents  of  less  rigid  and   more   organic   inspired   shapes.   Graceful,   rounded,   expanded   looking   shapes   con>nue   to   be   very   popular   but  we  are  seeing  that  trend  taken  a  liYle  further  into   the   direc>on   of   droplet,   hanging,   dripping,   pulled,   “gloopy”   looking   forms   that   look   like   they   almost   just   “happened”  or  grew  in  the  space.  This  trend  is  coming   through   mostly   in   accent   pieces   such   as   ligh>ng,   ceramics,  glassware  and  accessories.  
  16. 16.     7:CRAFTED  WITH  CARE     Our   apprecia>on   for   items   made   by   human   hands   and   a   learned   skill   is   undergoing   resurgence.   CraP   made   items   and  those  with  a  unique  one  off  “handmade  like”  feel  offer   us   the   chance   to   have   pieces   that   we   perceive   as   “authen>c”   in   a   widely   mechanized   and   mass   produced   world.  Whether  its  using  tradi>onal  techniques  or  crea>ng   new   ones   “craP”   is   an   expression   of   wan>ng   to   stay   connected   to   what   makes   us   human.   Skills   like   binding,   weaving,  knoong,  quil>ng  and  needlework  will  be  evident   in  furnishings  and  accessories.    
  17. 17.     8:PHOTOGRAPHIC  IMAGERY     Social  media  and  informa>on  technology  are  beginning  to   have  an  effect  on  the  way  that  we  live  and  also  the  way   that  we  appreciate  seeing  things  around  us.    Photographic   images   and   images   that   have   been   manipulated   with   “instagram   like”   soP   filters   to   add   a   nostalgic   dream   like   quality   will   be   seen   in   wall   art,   soP   furnishings   and   accessories.   Advancements   in   digital   prin>ng   have   made   the  possibili>es  to  use  images  unlimited.  Artworks  can  now   be   whatever   size   you   like,   put   wherever   you   want   and   designed  to  feature  whatever  takes  your  fancy.  
  18. 18.     9:MERGING  OF  CULTURES     The   influence   of   cultures   from   many   different   regions  has  been  enriching  our  own  for  a  long  >me   now.   We   are   seeing   new   interpreta>ons   of   tradi>onal   ethnic   designs   as   they   morph   into   unending   new   possibili>es.   We   see   the   influence   not  only  in  colour,  texture  and  paYern  but  also  in   the  “mix  it  all  up”  style  of  decora>on  that  we  tend   to   use.   Major   influences   come   from   Africa,   Asia,   The   Middle   East   and   Europe.     We   are   now   also   tapping  directly  into  the  USA’s  own  pre-­‐melted  pot   for  new  inspira>on.  
  19. 19.     10:ENVIRONMENT  FRIENDLY  IS  MAINSTREAM     Environmental  considera>on  is  no  longer  something   that  just  sits  in  the  back  of  our  heads.    We  recognise   that  the  way  that  we  live  in  the  world  and  what  we   take   from   it   ul>mately   has   an   impact   directly   upon   us.     Environmentally   friendly   design,   sustainability,   passive   homes,   products   that   require   less   energy,   reducing   the   running   costs   of   our   homes,   new   ligh>ng   op>ons,   repurposing,   recycling,   up-­‐cycling   and   new   hybrid   materials   are   either   standard   or   con>nue  to  emerge.    
  20. 20.     INTERNATIONAL  design  trade  fairs  are  a  lightning  rod  for  future  forecas2ng  of  global   trends  in  furniture,  furnishings,  ligh2ng,  accessories  and  technology.     The  Milan  Furniture  Fair,  Chicago’s  NeoCon  Fair  for  commercial  interiors  and  Orgatec,  a   biennial   exhibi>on   for   the   future   of   office   and   workspace   design   held   in   Cologne,   are   highly  an>cipated  events  that  aYract  thousands  of  design  professionals.     A  week  aPer  his  return  from  the  NeoCon  Fair  in  June,  Laminex  Group  Design  Director  Neil   Sookee  presented  Global  Trends  2015  to  a  group  of  Melbourne  designers  who  gathered   at  the  Workspace  showroom  in  South  Melbourne.  His  insights  into  the  future  direc>on  of   global  design  in  office  and  living  environments  observed  in  Milan,  Cologne,  Chicago  and   New   York   covered   new   technology   in   workspace   design,   ergonomics,   colour,   finishes,   texture  and  light.       Global  Interior  Design  Trends  2015  
  21. 21.     At   NeoCon   2014,   the   theme   of   ‘Place   MaYers’   focused   on   design   that   promotes   workplace   collabora>on,   flexibility,   energy   and   intellect   as   an   extension   of   the   Living   Office  philosophy  introduced  by  acclaimed  furniture  company  Herman  Miller  last  year.   The  aim  is  to  create  a  workplace  that  encourages  relaxa>on  and  wellness  which  in  turn   s>mulates  a  crea>ve,  focused  and  produc>ve  working  environment.     “Felt  is  the  darling  material  for  the  office  interior,”  Sookee  said,  no>ng  that  the  selec>on   of  finishes  and  designing  for  the  senses  is  an  important  element  of  the  design  process.   SoP  to  the  touch,  felt  is  used  to  upholster  worksta>on  screens  and  panels  which  absorb   ambient  noise,  task  sea>ng  and  casual  sea>ng  in  public  and  private  mee>ng  areas.  Wool,   >mber  and  the  emergence  of  cork  tex>les  are  other  materials  that  connect  the  office   interior  with  nature.     Contemporary   office   design   also   looks   to   new   technology   to   improve   the   flexibility   needed   for   modern   shared   workspaces,   fully   wired   work   sta>ons   and   wireless   and   Bluetooth  technology.  The  height  adjustable  Kine>c  Desk  by  S>r,  launched  at  NeoCon   2014,   remembers   pre-­‐programmed   seongs   for   each   individual.   It   extends   from   the   typical   desk-­‐based   siong   posi>on   to   standing   height   for   a   healthy   alterna>ve   to   the   sta>c  desk  and  sedentary  mode  of  work.    
  22. 22.     Colour  paleYes  range  from  rus>c  earthy  tones  inspired  by  real  leather,  to   >nted  neutrals  and  pastels  in  combina>on  with  light  wood  grains.  “Blue  is   favoured  for  corporate  interiors  from  vapour  blues  to  the  deepest  indigo”   Sookee   noted.   “Yellow,   green   and   retro   paYerns   con>nue   to   influence   colour   schemes   today   and   large   scale   paYerns   in   black   and   white   are   >meless  combina>ons.”          
  23. 23.         “Light   natural   woods   and   the   ubiquitous   whitewashed   oak   remain   popular   in   Europe   and   reclaimed   woods   are   beginning   to   enter   the   office  market,”  he  said.      
  24. 24.       White  has  replaced  office  grey  as  a  popular  base  colour  for  worksta>ons  but   the  classic  accent  colours  of  apple  green  and  orange  remain  while  the  red   colour  paleYe  is  soPened  with  a  grey  base.  Retro  colours  such  as  burgundy,   gold  and  terracoYa,  grey-­‐browns  and  brown-­‐greys  have  emerged  alongside   >nted  neutrals,  pastels  and  neutral  woods.  Rose  gold  and  metallic  colours   are  also  found  in  ligh>ng  and  accessories.      
  25. 25.       Wall  treatments  can  also  be  ephemeral.  Light  projec>on  installa>ons   such   as   Lightweeds   designed   by   Simon   Heijdens,   and   natural   light   manipulated  by  architecture,  as  seen  in  the  interior  of  the  Light  Walls   House   designed   by   Japanese   studio   mA-­‐style   Architects,   create   dynamic  shadows  that  connect  interiors  with  nature.      
  26. 26.       There   are   many   reasons   for   a   sustainable   shiP   in   reference   to   Interior   Design   including   environmental   responsibility,   energy   and   water   efficiency,  and  community.   COMMERCIAL  DESIGN  TRENDS:   SUSTAINABILITY  
  27. 27.     Environmental  Responsibility     We  know  that  we  have  damaged  our  beau>ful  Mother  Earth  and  that  we  have  depleted   many  of  the  natural  resources  she  offers.  The  construc>on  industry  is  a  major  culprit  in   this  regards,  but  manufacturers  of  materials  are  stepping  up  to  the  plate  to  make  their   products   more   environmentally   friendly.   Recycled   content,   use   of   recyclable   ingredients,  reducing  or  elimina>ng  harmful  toxins,  and  reusing  or  reclaiming  materials   are  just  a  few  of  the  ways  they  are  doing  this.  Stay  tuned  for  our  upcoming  series  with   useful  >ps  for  selec>ng  sustainable  materials.   The  Jim  Paoson  Centre  for   Excellence  by  CEI  Architecture  is   an  excellent  example  of   sustainable  design.  Pictured   above:  Gymnasium  with  radiant   concrete/wood  walls  panels.  
  28. 28.     As  Interior  Designers  we  are  always  looking  for  ways  to  reduce  the  impact  of  our   designs   on   the   environment.   This   is   done   through   process,   research   and   implementa>on  of  innova>ve  or  tried  and  true  prac>ces  like  these:     •  For  a  renova>on,  careful  inventory  is  done  prior  to  the  space  planning  phase   to  determine  what  is  exis>ng  and  what  can  be  reused.  The  best  case  scenario   for   reuse   is   when   something   can   remain   as-­‐is,   but   other   opportuni>es   to   refinish,  relocate  or  reconfigure  exis>ng  items  are  also  inves>gated.   •  Research  and  proposal  of  environmentally  friendly  material  op>ons.   •  Informed  design  of  ligh>ng  for  energy  efficiency.   •  Passive  design  strategies  considering  daylight,  solar  gain  and  the  poten>al  for   natural  ven>la>on.  
  29. 29.     Energy  and  Water  Efficiency     Incorpora>ng  energy  and  water  efficient  fixtures  not  only   helps  reduce  your  carbon  footprint,  it  also  reduces  your   u>lity   bills   every   month.   It’s   a   win-­‐win   as   far   as   we’re   concerned!   Manufacturers   have   made   selec>ng   water   efficient  washroom  and  staff  room  fixtures  a  simple  task.   High   efficiency   toilets   (HETs)   and   natures   youth   hgh   dishwashers,   and   low   flow   faucets   with   aerators   are   a   couple  ways  to  use  less  water.     Constant   innova>ons   are   being   made   in   ligh>ng   technology,  specifically  energy  efficient  ligh>ng.  There  are   specific   waYage   requirements   that   your   commercial   space  must  meet  to  adhere  to  the  regula>ons  set  out  in   the  Canadian  Electrical  Code.  Working  with  professionals   to   design   the   ligh>ng   of   your   space   is   impera>ve   to   ensure  an  effec>ve  ligh>ng  scheme  for  your  space  while   mee>ng  the  code  requirements.   Profile  Smart  toilet  by  Caroma.  
  30. 30.     Community     The   true   defini>on   of   sustainability   is   an   all   encompassing   one   that   includes   suppor>ng  the  communi>es  you  live  in  or  that  are  close  to  you.  In  most  cases  you   will  not  be  able  to  source  everything  your  project  requires  locally,  but  you  may  be   surprised  at  the  talent  located  just  outside  your  door.  U>lizing  products  from  local   ar>sts   and   manufacturers   is   one   way   to   give   back   your   community   and   show   apprecia>on  for  their  talents.  To  put  a  green  spin  on  this  point  the  product  does   not  have  to  travel  which  cuts  down  on  greenhouse  gas  emissions.  And,  hey!,  you   don’t  pay  for  the  delivery  charges  either.   The   Centre   for   Excellence   at   Okanagan   College   is   designed   to   the   standards   of   the   Living   Building   Challenge   with   strict   guidelines   on   materials   used   and   where   they   are   sourced   from.   Locally   sourced   pine   beetle   wood   was  used  extensively  throughout.    

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