386sum08ch8

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386sum08ch8

  1. 1. 8 Chapter Securing Information Systems
  2. 2. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Management Information Systems Chapter 8 Securing Information Systems <ul><li>Analyze why information systems need special protection from destruction, error, and abuse. </li></ul><ul><li>Assess the business value of security and control. </li></ul><ul><li>Design an organizational framework for security and control. </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluate the most important tools and technologies for safeguarding information resources. </li></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>Problem: Large number of vulnerable users of online financial services, ease of creating bogus Web sites. </li></ul><ul><li>Solutions: Deploy anti-phishing software and services and a multilevel authentication system to identify threats and reduce phishing attempts. </li></ul><ul><li>Deploying new tools, technologies, and security procedures, along with educating consumers, increases reliability and customer confidence. </li></ul><ul><li>Demonstrates IT’s role in combating cyber crime. </li></ul><ul><li>Illustrates digital technology as part of a multilevel solution as well as its limitations in overcoming discouraged consumers. </li></ul>Phishing: A Costly New Sport for Internet Users Management Information Systems Chapter 8 Securing Information Systems
  4. 4. SYSTEM VULNERABILITY AND ABUSE Why Systems Are Vulnerable Management Information Systems Chapter 8 Securing Information Systems Contemporary Security Challenges and Vulnerabilities Figure 8-1
  5. 5. <ul><li>Use of fixed Internet addresses through use of cable modems or DSL </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of encryption with most Voice over IP (VoIP) </li></ul><ul><li>Widespread use of e-mail and instant messaging (IM) </li></ul>Management Information Systems Chapter 8 Securing Information Systems SYSTEM VULNERABILITY AND ABUSE Internet Vulnerabilities: Why Systems Are Vulnerable (Continued)
  6. 6. <ul><li>Radio frequency bands are easy to scan </li></ul><ul><li>The service set identifiers (SSID) identifying the access points broadcast multiple times </li></ul>Management Information Systems Chapter 8 Securing Information Systems SYSTEM VULNERABILITY AND ABUSE Wireless Security Challenges:
  7. 7. <ul><li>Computer viruses, worms, </li></ul><ul><li>Spyware </li></ul><ul><li>Identity theft, phishing, pharming </li></ul><ul><li>Cyberterrorism and Cyberwarfare </li></ul><ul><li>Vulnerabilities from internal threats (employees); software flaws </li></ul>Management Information Systems Chapter 8 Securing Information Systems SYSTEM VULNERABILITY AND ABUSE Malicious Software: Viruses, Worms, and Spyware Hackers and Cybervandalism
  8. 8. <ul><li>Inadequate security and control may create serious legal liability. </li></ul><ul><li>Businesses must protect not only their own information assets but also those of customers, employees, and business partners. Failure to do so can lead to costly litigation for data exposure or theft. </li></ul><ul><li>A sound security and control framework that protects business information assets can thus produce a high return on investment. </li></ul>Management Information Systems Chapter 8 Securing Information Systems BUSINESS VALUE OF SECURITY AND CONTROL
  9. 9. <ul><li>General controls: </li></ul><ul><li>Software and hardware </li></ul><ul><li>Computer operations </li></ul><ul><li>Data security </li></ul><ul><li>Systems implementation process </li></ul>Management Information Systems Chapter 8 Securing Information Systems ESTABLISHING A MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK FOR SECURITY AND CONTROL Types of Information Systems Controls
  10. 10. <ul><li>Input </li></ul><ul><li>Processing </li></ul><ul><li>Output </li></ul>Management Information Systems Chapter 8 Securing Information Systems ESTABLISHING A MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK FOR SECURITY AND CONTROL Application controls:
  11. 11. Management Information Systems Chapter 10 Security and Control ESTABLISHING A MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK FOR SECURITY AND CONTROL Security Profiles for a Personnel System Figure 8-4
  12. 12. <ul><li>Disaster recovery planning: Plans for restoration of computing and communications disrupted by an event such as an earthquake, flood, or terrorist attack </li></ul><ul><li>Business continuity planning: Plans for handling mission-critical functions if systems go down </li></ul>Management Information Systems Chapter 8 Securing Information Systems ESTABLISHING A MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK FOR SECURITY AND CONTROL Ensuring Business Continuity
  13. 13. Management Information Systems Chapter 8 Securing Information Systems TECHNOLOGIES AND TOOLS FOR SECURITY AND CONTROL Access Control <ul><li>Passwords </li></ul>Authentication: Access control: Consists of all the policies and procedures a company uses to prevent improper access to systems by unauthorized insiders and outsiders <ul><li>Biometric authentication </li></ul>
  14. 14. <ul><li>Firewalls: Hardware and software controlling flow of incoming and outgoing network traffic </li></ul><ul><li>Intrusion detection systems: Full-time monitoring tools placed at the most vulnerable points of corporate networks to detect and deter intruders </li></ul>Management Information Systems Chapter 8 Securing Information Systems TECHNOLOGIES AND TOOLS FOR SECURITY AND CONTROL Firewalls, Intrusion Detection Systems, and Antivirus Software
  15. 15. <ul><li>Antivirus software: Software that checks computer systems and drives for the presence of computer viruses and can eliminate the virus from the infected area </li></ul>Management Information Systems Chapter 8 Securing Information Systems TECHNOLOGIES AND TOOLS FOR SECURITY AND CONTROL Firewalls, Intrusion Detection Systems, and Antivirus Software (Continued)
  16. 16. Management Information Systems Chapter 10 Security and Contr Chapter 8 Securing Information Systems ol TECHNOLOGIES AND TOOLS FOR SECURITY AND CONTROL A Corporate Firewall Figure 8-6
  17. 17. <ul><li>Public key encryption: Uses two different keys, one private and one public. The keys are mathematically related so that data encrypted with one key can be decrypted using only the other key </li></ul><ul><li>Message integrity: The ability to be certain that the message being sent arrives at the proper destination without being copied or changed </li></ul>Management Information Systems Chapter 8 Securing Information Systems TECHNOLOGIES AND TOOLS FOR SECURITY AND CONTROL Encryption and Public Key Infrastructure
  18. 18. <ul><li>Digital signature: A digital code attached to an electronically transmitted message that is used to verify the origin and contents of a message </li></ul>Management Information Systems Chapter 8 Securing Information Systems TECHNOLOGIES AND TOOLS FOR SECURITY AND CONTROL Encryption and Public Key Infrastructure (Continued)
  19. 19. <ul><li>Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) and its successor Transport Layer Security (TLS): protocols for secure information transfer over the Internet; enable client and server computer encryption and decryption activities as they communicate during a secure Web session. </li></ul><ul><li>Secure Hypertext Transfer Protocol (S-HTTP): used for encrypting data flowing over the Internet; limited to Web documents, whereas SSL and TLS encrypt all data being passed between client and server. </li></ul>Management Information Systems Chapter 8 Securing Information Systems TECHNOLOGIES AND TOOLS FOR SECURITY AND CONTROL Encryption and Public Key Infrastructure (Continued)
  20. 20. Management Information Systems Chapter 8 Securing Information Systems TECHNOLOGIES AND TOOLS FOR SECURITY AND CONTROL Public Key Encryption Figure 8-7
  21. 21. Worldwide Damage from Digital Attacks Figure 8-3 This chart shows estimates of the average annual worldwide damage from hacking, malware, and spam since 1999. These data are based on figures from mi2G and the authors. Systems Vulnerability and Abuse Management Information Systems Chapter 8 Securing Information Systems

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