LMP & Inkjet By: Himanshu Sharma Kiren Kesavan Vishal Tandon Rajhans  Jain Vineetha Bambasala
Introduction <ul><li>An  inkjet  printer is any printer that places extremely small droplets of ink onto paper to create a...
Characteristics <ul><li>Inkjet printers are fairly inexpensive. </li></ul><ul><li>Non-impact  - These printers do not touc...
Components  (Print Head Assembly) Print head   Print head stepper motor   <ul><li>Ink Cartridges </li></ul><ul><li>Belt </...
Components Paper Feed Assembly <ul><li>Paper tray/feeder  </li></ul><ul><li>Rollers </li></ul><ul><li>Paper feed stepper m...
Technologies <ul><li>There are two main technologies in use in contemporary inkjet printers:  </li></ul><ul><li>Continuous...
Continuous Inkjet <ul><li>The continuous inkjet method is used commercially for marking and coding of products and package...
Drop On Demand: Thermal <ul><li>Canon, Hewlett-Packard, and Lexmark (but not Epson), use print cartridges with a series of...
Piezoelectric/piezoelectric DOD Inkjet <ul><li>Most commercial and industrial inkjet printers and some consumer printers (...
Line Matrix Printers: <ul><li>Origins </li></ul><ul><li>The  line printer  is a form of high speed impact printer in which...
Four principal design s <ul><li>Drum printers: </li></ul><ul><li>In a typical  drum printer  design, a fixed font characte...
<ul><li>Chain (train) printers: </li></ul><ul><li>Chain printers  (also known as  train printers ) placed the type on movi...
<ul><li>Comb printers :   </li></ul><ul><li>In these printers, a comb of hammers printed a portion of a row of pixels at o...
<ul><li>Merits </li></ul><ul><li>Speed </li></ul><ul><li>Clarity </li></ul><ul><li>Print Head Life </li></ul><ul><li>Demer...
 
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Presentation On LMP, DMP & Inkjet Printers

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Presentation On LMP, DMP & Inkjet Printers

  1. 1. LMP & Inkjet By: Himanshu Sharma Kiren Kesavan Vishal Tandon Rajhans Jain Vineetha Bambasala
  2. 2. Introduction <ul><li>An inkjet printer is any printer that places extremely small droplets of ink onto paper to create an image. </li></ul><ul><li>(The dots are extremely small (usually between 50 and 60 microns in diameter), so small that they are tinier than the diameter of a human hair (70 microns)! </li></ul><ul><li>The phenomena of uniform drop formation from a stream of liquid issuing from an orifice were noted as early as 1833 by Savart and described mathematically by Lord Rayleigh and Weber </li></ul><ul><li>In the 1950's, the production of drops by electromechanically induced pressure waves was observed by Hansell. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Characteristics <ul><li>Inkjet printers are fairly inexpensive. </li></ul><ul><li>Non-impact - These printers do not touch the paper when creating an image. Inkjet printers are part of this group, which includes: </li></ul><ul><li>Inkjet printers, which are described in here, use a series of nozzles to spray drops of ink directly on the paper. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Components (Print Head Assembly) Print head Print head stepper motor <ul><li>Ink Cartridges </li></ul><ul><li>Belt </li></ul><ul><li>Stabilizer Bar </li></ul>
  5. 5. Components Paper Feed Assembly <ul><li>Paper tray/feeder </li></ul><ul><li>Rollers </li></ul><ul><li>Paper feed stepper motor </li></ul><ul><li>Control Circuit </li></ul>
  6. 6. Technologies <ul><li>There are two main technologies in use in contemporary inkjet printers: </li></ul><ul><li>Continuous (CIJ) </li></ul><ul><li>Drop-on-Demand (DOD) </li></ul><ul><li>Drop-on-demand is further divided into: </li></ul><ul><li>Thermal DOD and </li></ul><ul><li>Piezoelectric DOD </li></ul>
  7. 7. Continuous Inkjet <ul><li>The continuous inkjet method is used commercially for marking and coding of products and packages. </li></ul><ul><li>The idea was first patented in 1867, by Lord Kelvin and the first commercial devices (medical strip chart recorders) were introduced in 1951 by Siemens. </li></ul><ul><li>In continuous inkjet technology, a high-pressure pump directs liquid ink from a reservoir through a gunbody and a microscopic nozzle, creating a continuous stream of ink. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Drop On Demand: Thermal <ul><li>Canon, Hewlett-Packard, and Lexmark (but not Epson), use print cartridges with a series of tiny chambers each containing a heater, all of which are constructed by photolithography. </li></ul><ul><li>To eject a droplet from each chamber, a pulse of current is passed through the heating element causing a rapid vaporization of the ink in the chamber to form a bubble, which causes a large pressure increase, propelling a droplet of ink onto the paper (hence Canon's trade name of Bubble Jet for its technology) </li></ul>
  9. 9. Piezoelectric/piezoelectric DOD Inkjet <ul><li>Most commercial and industrial inkjet printers and some consumer printers (those produced by Epson) use a piezoelectric material in an ink-filled chamber behind each nozzle instead of a heating element. </li></ul><ul><li>When a voltage is applied, the piezoelectric material changes shape, which generates a pressure pulse in the fluid forcing a droplet of ink from the nozzle. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Line Matrix Printers: <ul><li>Origins </li></ul><ul><li>The line printer is a form of high speed impact printer in which one line of type is printed at a time. </li></ul><ul><li>They are mostly associated with the early days of computing, but the technology is still in use. Print speeds of 600 to 1200 lines-per-minute (approximately 10 to 20 pages per minute) were common. </li></ul><ul><li>The first line printer was the &quot;Potter Flying Typewriter&quot;, in 1952. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Four principal design s <ul><li>Drum printers: </li></ul><ul><li>In a typical drum printer design, a fixed font character set is engraved onto the periphery of a number of print wheels, the number matching the number of columns (letters in a line) the printer could print. The wheels, joined to form a large drum (cylinder), spin at high speed and paper and an inked ribbon is stepped (moved) past the print position. </li></ul>
  12. 12. <ul><li>Chain (train) printers: </li></ul><ul><li>Chain printers (also known as train printers ) placed the type on moving bars (a horizontally-moving chain). As with the drum printer, as the correct character passed by each column, a hammer was fired from behind the paper. </li></ul><ul><li>Bar printers : </li></ul><ul><li>Bar printers were similar to chain printers but were slower and less expensive. Rather than a chain moving continuously in one direction, the characters were on fingers mounted on a bar that moved left-to-right and then right-to-left in front of the paper. </li></ul>
  13. 13. <ul><li>Comb printers : </li></ul><ul><li>In these printers, a comb of hammers printed a portion of a row of pixels at one time (for example, every eighth pixel). By shifting the comb back and forth slightly, the entire pixel row could be printed (continuing the example, in eight cycles). Printronix and TallyGenicom are well-known vendors of comb printers . </li></ul>
  14. 14. <ul><li>Merits </li></ul><ul><li>Speed </li></ul><ul><li>Clarity </li></ul><ul><li>Print Head Life </li></ul><ul><li>Demerits </li></ul><ul><li>Bulky </li></ul><ul><li>Expensive </li></ul><ul><li>Complex operation </li></ul><ul><li>High maintenance </li></ul>

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