IFCA Art Talk Photo Realism

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  • IFCA Art Talk Photo Realism

    1. 1. THE VALUE OF ART An Exploration of European PhotoRealistic Paintings
    2. 2. Charles Bell (American, 1935-1995), Hot Pursuit, 1994
    3. 3. Richard ESTES, Bus reflections (Ansonia, Connecticut, USA), 1972 huile sur toile, 101,6 x 132,1cm, collection privée.
    4. 4. Self Portrait Semyon Faibisovich
    5. 5. Still Life with Spoons, 2006 Pigmented inkjet on rag paper 22 x 23.75 in. Edition of 30
    6. 6. SUPERREALISM HYPERREALISM
    7. 7. Malcolm Morley, Farewell to Crete 1984, Oil on canvas, 203.2 x 417 cm
    8. 8. Rene Magritte The Human Condition
    9. 9. Don Eddy: Dumper Section XX. Acrylic on Canvas,122 cm x 168 cm, 1970
    10. 10. Thor I Loading in Richard's Bay, Malcolm Morley, Oil on canvas, 60" x 70"
    11. 11. Rackstraw Downes Three London Plane Trees Near the Track in Red Hook Park 2002 oil on canvas, 35.5 x 55.25 inches
    12. 12. Madart, trompe l’oeil
    13. 13. Madart, trompe l’oeil
    14. 14. REALISM
    15. 15. Two Jars Hot Pepper Pickles, Janet Fish
    16. 16. Edouard Manet: Le Déjeuner sur l'herbe. (Luncheon on the Grass) 1863.
    17. 17. SURREALISM
    18. 18. René Magritte: Time Transfixed, 1934
    19. 19. Salvador Dali, The Persistence of Memory
    20. 20. PHOTO-REALISM
    21. 21. Chuck Close: Big Self-Portrait. Acrylic on canvas 107 1/2 x 83 1/2 inches. 1968
    22. 22. <ul><li>The Photo-Realist uses the camera and photograph to gather information. </li></ul><ul><li>The Photo-Realist uses a mechanical or semimechanical means to transfer the information to the canvas. </li></ul><ul><li>The Photo-Realist must have the technical ability to make the finished work appear photographic. </li></ul><ul><li>The artist must have exhibited work as a Photo-Realist by 1972 to be considered one of the central Photo-Realists. </li></ul><ul><li>The artist must have devoted at least five years to the development and exhibition of Photo-Realist work.[5] </li></ul>
    23. 23. PHOTOGRAPHIC REALISM
    24. 24. Thomas Ruff: Portrait (V. Liebermann), 210 x 165 cm, 1999
    25. 25. &quot;Diner&quot; by Richard Estes, 1971, Oil, 101 x 126 cm, Hirshhorn Museum, Washington, DC
    26. 26. Duane Hanson Tourists II 1988, autobody filler, fibreglass and mixed media, with accessories life size
    27. 27. Duane Hanson, Man on a bench, 1997-98, vinyl, polychromed in oil,with accessories life size
    28. 28. John De Andrea Sitting Woman
    29. 29. Queenie II Duane Hanson, Mixed Media Polychromed bronze, with Accessories life size
    30. 30. Audrey Flack’s Marilyn Vanitas
    31. 31. Audrey Flack, Queen, 1976, acrylic on canvas, 80 x 80 inches, On loan from a private collection
    32. 32. The birthday party 75x75cm Acrylic on canvas 2006
    33. 33. The car fetishist 5 100x100cm Acrylic on canvas 2003
    34. 34. On the run 75x90 cm Acrylic on canvas 2006
    35. 35. The daily good news 60x48cm Acrylic on canvas 2006
    36. 36. Living on the edge 75x75cm Acrylic on canvas 2006
    37. 37. Where are our dreams leading us?/ 75x90cm/ Acrylic on canvas/ 2006
    38. 38. The Candlelight Dinner/ 100 x 115cm/ Acrylic on canvas/ 2006
    39. 39. The car fetishist 9 50x50cm Acrylic on canvas 2006
    40. 40. The car fetishist 5. Gridpaint 100x100cm Acrylic on canvas 2006
    41. 43. Evaluating Quality in Contemporary Art <ul><li>3 simple rules for discerning whether or not an artwork has what it takes to stand the test of time </li></ul><ul><li>PPP Test as a decision </li></ul>
    42. 44. PAST PRESENT PERSONAL Contemporary Art Test A work of art must balance three elements : PAST --Does it understand the past? PRESENT --Does it elucidate the present? PERSONAL --Does it reflect a personal vision?
    43. 45. PPP Contemporary Art Test <ul><li>PAST </li></ul><ul><ul><li>An artwork too involved in the past tends to be derivative and insipidly decorative. Whatever the genre, it is not art but just a pretty picture. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>An artwork ignorant of visual history tends to be naive in concept and/or realization. Amusing and childlike, this kind of art fails to make use of thousands of years of artistic creation. Idiot savantes are as rare in art as they are elsewhere. </li></ul></ul>
    44. 46. PPP Contemporary Art Test <ul><li>PRESENT </li></ul><ul><ul><li>An artwork too much of its time is immediately attractive but doesn't age well. Lacking a universal aspect that fine art embodies, its destiny is time-capsule nostalgia. Several over-hyped contemporary artists come to mind. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>An artwork that does not vibrate with its time fails one of the primary missions of art: to be a predictive and interpretive tool of the culture. From Michelangelo, to Vermeer, to Picasso, to Warhol--all of these great artists resonated like tuning forks with the world around them. </li></ul></ul>
    45. 47. PPP Contemporary Art Test <ul><li>PERSONAL </li></ul><ul><ul><li>An artwork too autobiographical becomes &quot;dear diary&quot;. While paintings by the very self-involved or the insane may be vivid and telling, the chronicle of a personal pathology is not art. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>An artwork with too little personal imprint lacks originality and vision. This failing deprives the viewer of one of the primary joys of art: to leave personal limitations behind and experience the world through another's inciteful, inventive persona. </li></ul></ul>
    46. 48. American vs European Art <ul><li>a European painting refers to the cultural and art historical traditions that preceded it; </li></ul><ul><li>an American painting is concerned with seeing and accurately rendering whatever is in front of the artist. </li></ul>
    47. 49. American vs European Art <ul><li>With American art, what-you-see-is-what-you-get. </li></ul><ul><li>With European art, a cigar is much more than a cigar. </li></ul>
    48. 50. Techniques in Art <ul><li>As an art investor, the complex techniques involved in making the art can only re-inforce its value: such artworks are illusive targets for knock-offs or duplication. </li></ul>

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