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Delhi.ppt

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Delhi.ppt

  1. 1. Delhi is the capital of India. The state is spread over an area of 1483 square kilometer. According to the Indian geography the state is located at the center of the Indian subcontinent, amidst the ranges of Himalaya and the Aravalli. Delhi geography encompasses the location, climatic conditions, topography and so on. The latitudinal and longitudinal location of Delhi are 23.38 degree north and 77.13 degree east. The state stands at the northern part of India. Haryana and Uttar Pradesh are the other states, which share their borders with Delhi in the west and east respectively. Delhi geography divides the state into three parts- the Delhi ridge, the Yamuna flood plain and the plains. INTRODUCTION LOCATION
  2. 2. The topography of Delhi can be divided into three different parts, the plains, the Yamuna flood plain, and the ridge. As per the topography, Delhi is located on the western fringes of the Gangetic Plains. The other topographical feature is the Ridge, which reaches the height of 1043 ft above sea level, and is the highest point in Delhi. There are three canals crossing it, namely the Yamuna Canal, the Agra Canal, and the Hindu Canal. TOPOGRAPHY
  3. 3. NATURAL ENVIRONMENT Physical Features The city of Delhi lies in the fertile Northern Plains of India. The main features of Delhi are the Aravalli hill ranges and the Yamuna river. The Aravalli hill ranges are covered with forest called the Ridges. The Yamuna is the main source of drinking water for the citizens of Delhi. There is a forest cover of nearly 11.5% of the total area in Delhi. Delhi’s mineral sources are primarily sand and stone which are used for construction activities. Climate Delhi has a semi arid climate, with hot summers, average rainfall and moderate winters. Mean monthly temperatures range from 14.3° C in January to 34.5° C in June. However, the temperatures go upto 40-45° C in summers and 4-5° C in winters. The annual precipitation is about 711 mm Wind Direction Wind directions vary with season. In the summers, the predominant wind directions are from the west in the morning and either west or northwest in the evening. In the monsoons, the predominant wind directions are from the southeast or west in the morning and from east (in July and August) or north-west (in September) in the evenings. Water Resources Delhi’s sources of water consist of surface and ground water.
  4. 4. Delhi, considered as a historic city of potential World Heritage significance due to the unparalleled richness and diversity of its natural and cultural heritage, is also one of the most prominent tourist destinations in North India, and is perceived as the ‘Gateway to North India’. Due to its location as an important node of both the Agra-Jaipur and Varanasi-Khajuraho circuits, Delhi received over 3.2 million domestic and international tourists in 2010-11. HERITAGE & TOURISM SECTOR Delhi’s rich, multi-layered heritage needs to be considered as an economic resource or ‘heritage capital’, capable of enriching the quality of life of Delhi’s inhabitants & stimulating development through growth of heritage tourism. Innovative management strategies for the heritage assets of Delhi are required to ensure creation of employment opportunities linked to cultural tourism and provision of facilities for mid-range tourists in heritage areas. Benefits That Can Be Drawn Delhi is one of the major hubs for this sector along with Bangalore, Hyderabad, Chennai, and Mumbai-Pune. The city, with its large population of well educated work force, is ideally positioned to attain the pre-eminent position for providing workers for this fast growth sector. However, there is need for undertaking major capacity building exercise in consonance with the requirements of this sector. THE IT & ITES SECTOR
  5. 5. 1. Delhi is the largest metropolis of India and eighth largest of the World. 2. Historically, developments in Delhi took place in a triangular patch of land with river Yamuna on one side and the northern range of Aravalli hills on the other two sides. 3. It started as Indraprastha, a small settlement by Pandavas within the Khandva Forest near Yamuna around 2500 BC. 4. Later in 736 AD, Tomar kings established a new city named Lal Kot and the Chauhans replaced the Tomars in the mid-12th C and extended Lal Kot to form Qila Rai Pithora. 5. Delhi grew to be capital of an empire in the time of the Delhi Sultanate, with the establishment of Siri. 6. Ghiyasuddin Tughlaq, the first of the Tughlaq kings who established Tughlaqabad, In AD 1327, Muhammad-bin-Tughlaq linked the older cities of Lal Kot and Siri with two walls to build, Jahanpanah. 7. Firoz Shah Tughlaq built Firozabad, on the banks of River Yamuna. 8. Delhi was then intermittently the capital of the Mughal Empire, Emperor Humayun, in AD 1538, built shergarh.
  6. 6. NEW DELHI designed by Sir Edward Lutyens and Herbert Baker, redefined the architecture and urbanism of Delhi in the process of addressing contemporary imperatives. New Delhi Old Delhi OLD DELHI, walled city was founded as Shahjahanabad by Mughal Emperor Shahjahan in 1639. It remained the capital of the Mughals until the end of the Mughal dynasty. It was once filled with mansions of nobles and members of the royal court, along with elegant mosques and gardens.
  7. 7. HISTORIC PLACES IN OLD DELHI Ghalib Ki Haveli Razia Sultanas’ tomb Khari Baoli, Asia's biggest spice market Rajghat Mahatma Gandhi's cremation site memorial Begum Samru's Palace Old Delhi Railway Station
  8. 8. DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE OF THE CITY
  9. 9. POPULATION GROWTH Delhi is most populated and the fastest growing city in the country. Since it is the national capital, the biggest Trading centre and the largest centre for small industries in India. A large part of is rapid growth has been due to high level of migration. the annual average growth rate of population of Delhi is 3.85 as per census 2001. it was highest during 1941 to 1951 due to large scale migration of people from Pakistan to India after partition. MIGRATION INTO DELHI
  10. 10. •The rural population, which was 47.24% of Delhi’s population in 1901 continued to decline to 7.27% in 1981, but increased to 10.07% in 1991. This reversal of the long term trend during 1981-1991 was due to mushrooming of unauthorised colonies in rural areas. • The family size in urban areas is 4.99 persons in comparison with rural family size of 5.90 persons. • Economic Survey found that literacy in Delhi during 1997 was 85% compared to the national literacy level of 62%. According to this survey, the male literacy rate in Delhi during 1997 was 91% and the female rate was 76%, compared to the national literacy rates of 73% for males and 50% for females. • Based on birth and death rates, the natural growth in Delhi’s population has declined from 2.21% in 1991 to 1.85% in 1997.
  11. 11. POPULATION DENSITY DISTRIC WISE DENSITY OF POPULATION IN DELHI [YEAR 2011] ACORDING TO CENSUS 2001, AVERAGE DENSITY OF POPULATION OF DELHI IS 9340 PERSONS PER SQ. KM AGAINST THE DENSITY OF POPULATION OF COUNTRY IS 334PERSONS PER SQ. KM. DELHI HAS THE HIGHEST POPULATION DENSITY AMONG THE UNION TERITORIES
  12. 12. CITY ECONOMIC PROFILE •DELHI WITH MILLION PLUS POPULATION HAS ONE OF THE FASTEST GROWING ECONOMIES IN INDIA. • WITH 15% AVERAGE COMPOUND GROWTH RATE DELHI'S ECONOMY IS DRIVEN BY THE SERVICE SECTOR. •ITS 78% OF GSDP IS BECAUSE OF SERVICE SECTOR WHICH PROVIDE EMPLOYMENT TO 58% OF LABOUR CLASS. •PER CAPITAL INCOME FOR THE YEAR 2011-12 AT CURRENT PRICES IS ESTIMATED AS RS 175812. •MONTHLY PER CAPITAL EXPENDITURE OF DELHI IS RS. 2905 IN URBAN AND RS. 1761 IN RURAL. INVESTMENT PLAN OF NINTH FIVE YEAR PLAN [DATA RS. CRORE]
  13. 13. •Between 1981 and 1991 the population of Delhi increased rapidly but the proportion of workers in Delhi’s population declined marginally. Workers constituted 32.19% of Delhi’s population in 1981 which declined to 31.63% in 1991. In contrast, the percentage of workers in the total population increased from 35.70% in 1981 to 37.46% in 1991 at the National level. • The rate of increase of the Delhi workforce during 1981-91 was 48.85% compared to only 28.42% at the National level. The increase in Delhi was primarily due to migration of unemployed people from neighbouring states. Public sector Growth rate Central govt. -1.41% Govt. of Delhi 1.82% Quasi govt. (central + Delhi govt.) -3.30% Local bodies -3.09% Private sector 1.83%
  14. 14. •In Delhi, the period 1994-97 shows a downward trend in total public sector employment (-1.74%) but an increase of 1.83% in the private sector. Overall, employment in the public and private sectors together has fallen by 0.82%.
  15. 15. •On June 30, 1998, 11.08 lakh persons were registered on the Live Register of Employment Exchanges in Delhi, out of which 8.47 lakh (76.44%) had a diploma, a matriculation, degree or higher educational qualification and the remaining 2.61 lakh (23.56%) were below this educational level. • Several rounds of NSSO surveys show that the labour force, which consists of both employed and unemployed persons increased from 19.08 lakh in 1977-78 to 34.57 lakh in 1992. At the same time, the number of unemployed persons in Delhi decreased from 2.08 lakh in 1977-78 to 1.96 lakh in 1992. The proportion of unemployed persons to the total labour force declined significantly from 10.90% to 5.67% during this period.
  16. 16. Percentage of population working in different sector
  17. 17. URBAN GROTH In the planning of New Delhi in 1916, the Central Vista was conceived as a landscaped stretch to form continuity between the ridge and the river Yamuna. The stretch with the Rashtrapati Bhawan and the India Gate at two ends has tremendous visual quality and is one of the finest examples of Urban Design and monumentality in planning in the world. The following aspects need to be considered to arrive at the basis for policies affecting the urban fabric i) Areas of significance in built environment. ii) Visual integration of the city. iii) Policy for tall buildings. iv) Policy on unhindered access movement, parking and pedestrian realm. v) Policy on Hoardings, Street furniture and Signage. vi) Urban Design Scheme. vii) Policy for design of pedestrian realm. viii) City structure plan and Urban Design objective. ix) Policy for conservation of Heritage precincts Buildings and Zones.
  18. 18. A redevelopment strategy for accommodating more population in a planned manner is to be taken up on priority in all use zones for efficient and optimum utilization of the existing urban land, both in planned and unplanned areas. This would have to be based on provision of infrastructure viz. water supply, sewerage, road network, open spaces and the essential social infrastructure. To encourage the growth impulse for regeneration in the target redevelopment areas, the possible incentives and modalities recommended include grant of planning permission at the scheme level with permission to reorganize / pool properties for planning purposes, provision of social infrastructure through Transferable Development Rights or Accommodation Reservation and reduced space standards for unplanned areas, enhanced FAR for specified redevelopment areas and application of flexible concept of mix-use zones in Special Area & Villages on scheme basis.
  19. 19. • NCT of Delhi. • Central National Capital Region - Central NCR • Highway Corridor Zone • Rest of NCR. Policy Zones of Delhi Land use Distribution
  20. 20. • Nehru Place • Rajendra Place • Bhikaji Cama Place • Janakpuri • Laxmi Nagar • Shivaji Place (Raja Garden) • Jhandewalan • Netaji Subhash Place (Wazirpur) • Saket • Manglam Place (Rohini) DISTRICT CENTRES
  21. 21. a. Central Vista and the areas in its North and South, Lutyen's Bungalow Zone. b. Ancient settlements. c. Historical Monuments and Gardens. d. Exhibition grounds, Zoo etc. e. Areas along entry routes and other important routes in Delhi. f. Republic day parade route. g. Road and Rail, MRTS corridors, entries, and terminals. h. City as a whole for aerial view OTHER AREAS
  22. 22. AVAILABILITY OF URBANISABLE LAND
  23. 23. HOUSING INTRODUCTION HOUSING CONDITION IN DELHI Housing condition is one of the important indicators of the socio- economic development of the country. Statistical information relating to housing condition in quantitative terms is essential for an assessment of the overall housing needs of the people and also for the formulation of housing policies and programmes. Housing of any place include type of structure, type of dwelling, ventilation, bathing, latrine and electricity facilities etc. It also gives an account of the civic amenities at the reach of the families living in the dwellings such as availability of drainage, garbage disposal arrangement, approach road/lane/constructed path etc. DDA commenced its housing activities in 1967 and has played a crucial role in providing more than a million houses to the people of Delhi.
  24. 24. TYPE OF STRUCTURES The structure of the dwelling can be classified on the basis of material used for its construction. Four type of structures are –  Pucca structure  Semi pucca structure  Serviceable kutcha  Unserviceable kutcha
  25. 25.  In Delhi 91.50% families live in pucca, 5.01% in semi-pucca, and 3.49% in kutcha type of structure as against the All India average of 66.1% in pucca, 21.3% in semi-pucca and 12.6% in kutcha type of houses.  56.62% households were residing in owned dwellings, 4.22% employer provided, 32.51% in rented dwelling and remaining 6.64% having other arrangement in Delhi. The national average in this respect was 85.2% owned, 1.8% employer provided accommodation, 10.9% in rented dwelling and 2.1% had other arrangement.
  26. 26.  In Delhi 51.13% stay in independent, 18.29% in flat type dwellings as against the national average of 74.9% in independent houses, 9.7% in flats .  In the urban areas 88.96% of families are living in the buildings which are used strictly for residential purpose, 10.13% were found to be used for residence-cum commercial purposes and 0.91% for residence-cum- other purposes.
  27. 27.  About 95.05% of the households were having burnt brick / stone /lime stone type of wall followed by 2.99% of canvass/cloth.  About 75.53% of the households were having cement type of floors followed by 13.01% of mosaic/tiles type.  About 64.33% of the households were in houses with a plinth area up to 50 sq.m. in the rural areas whereas the corresponding percentage was about 66.95% in the urban area. STATUS OF AMENITIES  84% of the households draw drinking water from tap, about 10.03% from tube well/ hand pump.  60% of the households have exclusive use of the water source, 20.86% were uses share as the same source and 17.26% depends on the source provided by the government.
  28. 28.  99.10% of households were having electricity connections for domestic use.  66.24% of households were having separate kitchen with or without water tap.  In urban 78.77% households were having either attached/detached bathroom facility.  Based on the record of preceding 5 years flood risk was experienced by only 0.66% of the households in Delhi due to excessive rain/river etc. SLUM A Slum is a compact area with a collection of poorly built tenements, mostly of temporary nature, crowded together usually with inadequate sanitary and drinking water facilities in unhygienic conditions. The slums are commonly known as jhuggi jhopri in Delhi.
  29. 29. SLUMS IN DELHI Bhalswa Slum Delhi
  30. 30. TRANSPORTATION IN DELHI Delhi is predominantly dependent on road transport, with the railways catering to only about 1% of the local traffic. The ring rail network in Delhi is grossly underutilized. Buses cater to 62% of the total traffic while personal vehicles account for the balance 37%. Although, buses constitute only 1.1% of the total number of vehicles. Among personalized vehicles, motor cycles and scooters comprise about two third of the total number of vehicles in Delhi, while cars and jeeps account for one fourth of the total vehicles. National Highways Five National Highways pass through the National Capital Territory of Delhi (NH-1, NH-2, NH-10, NH-8, NH-24). The Grand Trunk Road built by Sher Shah Suri from Karnal to Calcutta having been the precursor of NH-1 and NH-24.
  31. 31. CONVERGENCE OF NATIONAL HIGHWAYS
  32. 32. RAIL NETWORK Delhi is a major junction on the rail map of India linked with almost all Metropolitan cities directly. There are four major railway stations at New Delhi, Old Delhi, Hazrat Nizamuddin and Sarai Rohilla besides a Container Depot at Tuglakabad. There are 8 rail corridors in the National Capital Territory which bring in more than 350 passenger trains and 40 goods trains each day. RING ROAD The Ring road, Outer Ring road and the radial roads constitute a distinct feature of the road network in Delhi. Ring road has a length of 48 km, out of which 16 km is common with Outer Ring road and NH-1.
  33. 33. CONVERGENCE OF RAIL NETWORKS
  34. 34. NO. OF VEHICLES, ROAD LENGTH, VEHICULAR SPEED
  35. 35. With the development of two new ISBTs at Sarai Kale Khan and Anand Vihar and the existing ISBT at Kashmere Gate, three ISBTs are functioning at present. These three ISBTs care to an average 1.54 lakh passengers and 3300 buses/trips per day. Two more ISBTs are proposed to be constructed. INTERSTATE BUS TERMINALS FLYOVERS AND BRIDGES A special programme for construction of 15 flyovers on Ring Road and outer Ring Road was started in 1998-99. Construction work on flyovers at Punjabi Bagh and Raja Garden, started prior to 1998-99, is in full swing
  36. 36. Submitted by: Arun Chauhan Ankit Kumar Atul Kumar Piyush Kumar Pandey Santosh Kumar Meena Venktesh Shahwalia

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