© 2011 Strategic Development Solutions                               HAVEN FOR HOPE                                       ...
This Impact Report has been prepared by Strategic Development Solutions on behalf of theNational New Markets Fund, Wachovi...
TABLE OF CONTENTS1.0 INTRODUCTION ...........................................................................................
1.0 INTRODUCTION      1.0 INTRODUCTION1.1 IMPACT REPORT COMPONENTS AND PROCESSThis Project Impact Report seeks to delineat...
1.0 INTRODUCTION1.2 WHY AN IMPACT REPORT IS IMPORTANTMany project sponsors, as well as project funders, seek a vehicle to ...
1.0 INTRODUCTION1.3 REPORT COLLABORATORSOutlined below are descriptions of the firms that played an important role in crea...
1.0 INTRODUCTION     2.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY3.1 PROJECT OVERVIEWHaven for Hope of Bexar County, Texas is the larg-          ...
2.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARYThe need for a single integrated location (“single-       lic regardless of income. The campus also p...
2.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY4.1 ECONOMIC IMPACT                                         The Empowered Case Management software sy...
2.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY     3.0 HAVEN FOR HOPE CAMPUSA NEW APPROACH TO                                           Haven for H...
2.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY3.2 SPONSOR                                                 H4H is governed by an independent Board o...
3.0 HAVEN FOR HOPE CAMPUS   “I was hooked in two weeks. I signed on as an employee two months later. What hooked me was ju...
3.0 HAVEN FOR HOPE CAMPUS3.3 PROJECT IMPETUS                                                TABLE 2: HOMELESSNESS IN SAN A...
3.0 HAVEN FOR HOPE CAMPUSPhoenix Facility (opened Fall 2005):                                                             ...
3.0 HAVEN FOR HOPE CAMPUS3.4 HAVEN FOR HOPE CAMPUS                                PHASE I CAMPUS COMPONENTSThe 37-acre Hav...
3.0 HAVEN FOR HOPE CAMPUS                                                          formational Campus.                    ...
3.0 HAVEN FOR HOPE CAMPUSPROGRAMS: PROCESS AND SERVICES                            a client receives better living accomod...
3.0 HAVEN FOR HOPE CAMPUS                                                           • Includes emergency and long-term she...
3.0 HAVEN FOR HOPE CAMPUS                                                          CORE CAMPUS SERVICE PROVIDERS          ...
3.0 HAVEN FOR HOPE CAMPUS• Co-location -- client ease of receiving services is  more effective and efficient• Higher quali...
3.0 HAVEN FOR HOPE CAMPUS                                                                                SAVING AND TRANSF...
3.0 HAVEN FOR HOPE CAMPUSNEW TEST MODELS                                                        for Hope met with all of t...
3.0 HAVEN FOR HOPE CAMPUS                                                                                    The benefit o...
3.0 HAVEN FOR HOPE CAMPUS3.5 SITE BACKGROUND                                               The City of San Antonio, with a...
3.0 HAVEN FOR HOPE CAMPUSand existing homeless populations. The campus               site of SAMMinistries, the campus’ re...
SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope
SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope
SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope
SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope
SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope
SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope
SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope
SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope
SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope
SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope
SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope
SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope
SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope
SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope
SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope
SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope
SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope
SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope
SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope
SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope
SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope
SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope
SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope
SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope
SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope
SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope
SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope
SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope
SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope
SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope
SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope
SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope
SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope
SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope
SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope
SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope
SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope
SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope
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Strategic Development Solutions - Impact Report:
HAVEN FOR HOPE,
San Antonio, Texas
JULY, 2010

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SDS Impact Report: Haven for Hope

  1. 1. © 2011 Strategic Development Solutions HAVEN FOR HOPE IMPACT REPORT SAN ANTONIO, TX – JULY, 2010
  2. 2. This Impact Report has been prepared by Strategic Development Solutions on behalf of theNational New Markets Fund, Wachovia Community Development Enterprises IV, and Haven forHopeJulia Elrick | (310) 914-5333 ext. 218 | www.sdsgroup.comDisclaimer: Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that the data contained in this report reflects the most accurate andcomplete information possible. Many of the figures presented are based on estimates or information from the project sponsor andother projections have been derived from these estimates/information by Strategic Development Solutions (SDS) and MetropolitanResearch and Economics (MR+E) using financial modeling software (RIMS) and follow on consultations with project representatives.In the case of projections, an effort has been made to provide the reader with a statement of assumptions that detail the sources ofdata and/or methods by which statistics were generated. No responsibility is assumed for inaccuracies in reporting by project repre-sentatives or any other data source used in preparing this report. No warranty or representation is made by SDS or MR+E that any ofthe estimates contained in this report will be achieved.
  3. 3. TABLE OF CONTENTS1.0 INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................. 11.1 Impact Report Components and Process .......................................................................................................................................................... 11.2 Why an Impact Report is Important .................................................................................................................................................................... 21.3 Report Collaborators ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 32.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ..................................................................................................... 43.0 HAVEN FOR HOPE CAMPUS ............................................................................................ 73.1 Project Overview ........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 73.2 Sponsor Background ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 83.3 Project Impetus .........................................................................................................................................................................................................103.4 Haven For Hope Campus .......................................................................................................................................................................................123.5 Site Background ........................................................................................................................................................................................................213.6 Haven For Hope Financing....................................................................................................................................................................................264.0 PROJECT IMPACTS ......................................................................................................... 274.1 Economic Impacts ....................................................................................................................................................................................................284.2 Fiscal Impacts.............................................................................................................................................................................................................294.3 Social and Community Impacts ..........................................................................................................................................................................354.4 Environmental Impacts ..........................................................................................................................................................................................37APPENDICES ........................................................................................................................... 39Appendix A: Locations Of Tables And Figures ............................................................................................................................................................39Appendix B: Credentials Of Report Collaborators .....................................................................................................................................................40Appendix C: Regional Input-Output Modeling System (RIMS) II .........................................................................................................................41Appendix D: Partner Organizations ................................................................................................................................................................................43Appendix E: The Seven Guiding Principles of Transformation – Moving from Enablement to Engagement......................................46Appendix F: Civic Leaders Responsible For Creating and Funding The Haven For Hope Campus ..........................................................47Appendix G: References, Definitions and Assumptions ..........................................................................................................................................49Appendix H: Photo Credits ................................................................................................................................................................................................53Appendix I: Sample ECM Reporting ...............................................................................................................................................................................54Appendix J: Results of Efforts to Address Mental Illness, Substance Abuse andHomelessness in San Antonio & Bexar County...........................................................................................................................................................55Appendix K: Mayor Task Force Report - Executive Summary ................................................................................................................................57
  4. 4. 1.0 INTRODUCTION 1.0 INTRODUCTION1.1 IMPACT REPORT COMPONENTS AND PROCESSThis Project Impact Report seeks to delineate the comprehensive story behind the Haven for Hope project in SanAntonio, Texas. In doing so, the report provides a detailed project history and overview and describes real and pro-jected quantitative and qualitative project benefits achieved across four core areas:• Economic• Fiscal• Social and Community• EnvironmentalThe framework of this report is organized into three narrative sections beyond this Introduction (1.0):2.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARYThis section is a high level overview of all impacts included in the report.3.0 PROJECT OVERVIEWThis section includes a summary of the project, the sponsor’s organizational history and overview, the site’s history,and the project’s financing sources.4.0 PROJECT IMPACTSThis section details the project’s core economic, fiscal, social /community, and environmental impacts.PROCESSSDS’ process for conducting the research necessary for the Impact Report includes extensive communications andinterviews with the following project participants: project sponsor management and staff, development team con-sultants, contractor and subcontractors, community stakeholders, investors, lenders, and donors.In addition, SDS conducts research to collect information on project area demographics, socio-economics, andother relevant information to more fully present the complete scope of the project and its qualitative impacts onthe surrounding community.MR+E works directly with SDS to assess the full scope of project characteristics and utilize fiscal policy and eco-nomic data to run relevant analyses, considering both construction and operational phases.HAVEN FOR HOPE PAG E | 1
  5. 5. 1.0 INTRODUCTION1.2 WHY AN IMPACT REPORT IS IMPORTANTMany project sponsors, as well as project funders, seek a vehicle to effectively communicate the project’s economic,fiscal, social/community, and environmental impacts to multiple stakeholder groups. This report uses a combina-tion of quantitative data and qualitative information to comprehensively capture, analyze, and communicate thefull scope of a project’s benefits and impacts. Stakeholder groups that would benefit from reading a project’s impactreport include:INVESTORS/LENDERSInvestors and lenders, whether providing market-rate or below-market investments or loans, want to understandthe impacts of the projects they fund. This is often particularly true of bank lenders seeking Community Reinvest-ment Act (CRA) credit for their investments in low-income communities or other investors seeking to make animpact.DONORSDonors, by their very nature, are involved with the project because they want to see their donations make an im-pact. An Impact Report communicates the comprehensive impacts of their donation. Donors are increasingly seek-ing the type of transparency and accountability that an Impact Report achieves.TAXPAYERSTaxpayers provide the direct subsidies invested in a project via local, state, or federal government programs. Taxpay-ers do not have a direct vote on the specific project being funded. To ensure continued taxpayer support of suchfunding efforts and programs the benefit to taxpayers (in terms of jobs and community impacts as well as the finan-cial returns) need to be communicated.GOVERNMENTAs stewards of the taxpayers’ dollars, the local, state or federal government agencies involved in funding the projectcan utilize the Impact Report to better understand and communicate the value and return on the taxpayers’ invest-ment.COMMUNITIESThe Impact Report helps inform the communities surrounding the project of the resulting jobs, revitalization, andother community benefits.CDFI FUNDThe Impact Report notifies the CDFI Fund of how the project has achieved the NMTC program investment criteriaas well as fiscal and impact goals.HAVEN FOR HOPE PAG E | 2
  6. 6. 1.0 INTRODUCTION1.3 REPORT COLLABORATORSOutlined below are descriptions of the firms that played an important role in creating and providing the informationused for this Impact Report (See Appendix B for further background information on report consultants): STRATEGIC DEVELOPMENT SOLUTIONS (SDS) is the lead organization in creating this Impact Report, in partnership with Economic Innovation International, Inc and MR+E (below). SDS creates pre- and post-development impact reports tailored to the specific needs of individual clients and projects. SDS also develops innovative market-driven approaches to promote economic development. SDS has built and capitalized more than $2 billion of Double and Triple Bottom Line private-equity funds with its affiliated partner Economic Innovation International, Inc. Further, these two firms jointly man- age the $125 million National New Markets Fund, LLC (NNMF). www.sdsgroup.com ECONOMIC INNOVATION INTERNATIONAL is internationally recognized for building more than $150 billion of privately capitalized funds designed to accomplish civic and public purposes in 37 states and 21 nations within North America, Europe, and Asia since its founding in 1970. Economic Innovation jointly manages the $125 million Na- tional New Markets Fund, LLC with SDS. www.economic-innovation.com METROPOLITAN RESEARCH + ECONOMICS (MR+E) partners with SDS to provide the fiscal and economic analysis presented in Section 3.0. MR+E is a consulting company operated by David Bergman, an economist nationally recognized in the field of devel- oping econometric projections based on local, state, and federal fiscal and tax policy. www.mrpluse.com HAVEN FOR HOPE OF BEXAR COUNTY (H4HBC) is the sponsor of the project analyzed in this Impact Report. Haven for Hope is an independent 501(c)3 non-profit organiza- tion with the mission to transform and save lives. The core goal is to provide home- less individuals and families with the training, skills and assistance needed to help them become self-sufficient, and to do so in cost-effective and sustainable manner. www.havenforhope.org NATIONAL NEW MARKETS FUND (NNMF) invested $15 million in New Markets Tax Credits into the Haven for Hope project. NNMF was formed in 2005 as a joint venture partnership between Strategic Development Solutions and Economic Innovation In- ternational, Inc. Its goal is to invest its federal New Markets Tax Credit (NMTC) alloca- tions into catalytic economic and community development projects in economically distressed, low-income communities throughout the nation. WELLS FARGO & COMPANY is a diversified financial services company providing banking, insurance, investments, mortgage, and consumer and commercial finance through more than 9,000 stores and 12,000 ATMs and the Internet (wellsfargo.com and wachovia.com) across North America and internationally.HAVEN FOR HOPE PAG E | 3
  7. 7. 1.0 INTRODUCTION 2.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY3.1 PROJECT OVERVIEWHaven for Hope of Bexar County, Texas is the larg- TABLE 1: PROJECT OVERVIEWest, most comprehensive Homeless Transformation PROJECT BASICSCampus in the United States. Its vision is to provide 1 Haven For Hope Way, San Antonio, TX Locationa range of social services addressing the needs of San 78207Antonio’s homeless community (25,000 annually) by Mixed Use: Housing, Office, Social Ser- Asset Type vicesintegrating many critical services into a single multi- Owner/Developer Haven For Hope of Bexar Countyservice-campus setting. Most importantly, it is specif- Total Project Cost $103 Mically designed to tackle the root causes of homeless-ness. Seventy eight nonprofit and government Partner NMTC Allocations:agencies provide a wide-array of critical services to NNMF $15 Mthe homeless and surrounding community, including: Wachovia CDE IV $25Meducation, job training, day care, substance abuse Project Timeframe Start Date: 11/2007 End Date: 08/2010treatment, medical care, identification recovery, case COMMUNITY NEEDmanagement and animal care services. Poverty Rate 33.8%13.2 SPONSOR BACKGROUND Unemployment Rate 10.1%2; 1.6x national rateIn 2006, San Antonio Mayor Phil Hardberger and BillGreehey, a business and civic leader, met to discuss Family Income 51.5%3the serious and growing problem of homelessness State Enterprise Zone, Higher Distress,in Bexar County. As a result, Mayor Hardberger es- Economic Zones Targeted Population, Medically Under- served and Dental Care Health Profession-tablished the Community Council to End Homeless- al Shortage Area/Population, Economicness composed of community and business leaders Development and Housing Hot Zonewho were charged with developing a plan to reduce ECONOMIC, FISCAL, SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTShomelessness in San Antonio. In November 2006, at Construction Jobs 300the Council’s recommendation and through the lead- Permanent Jobs 150ership of Bill Greehey, Haven for Hope of Bexar Coun- Economic Impact4 $531.7Mty (H4HBC) was formed as an independent 501(c)(3) Fiscal Impact 5 $ 3Bnon-profit organization. Its mission is to transform Taxpayer Breakeven Year 6and save lives. 20-Year Taxpayer ROI 1105% Internal Rate of3.3 PROJECT IMPETUS Return 72%Each year, 25,000 in San Antonio are homeless; nearly Decrease in Homelessness4,000 on any given night. Families with children com- Improved Community Healthprise 47% of the homeless; overall 37% of the home- Personal and Workforce Developmentless are children. From 2006 - June 2007, Haven for Neighborhood RevitalizationHope planners undertook extensive research to guide LEED Certifiedtheir future efforts in building a homeless facility. Energy Use and CO2 Emission ReductionHAVEN FOR HOPE PAG E | 4
  8. 8. 2.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARYThe need for a single integrated location (“single- lic regardless of income. The campus also providesstop”) became clear as Haven for Hope planners con- referrals to services in the community, such as Sanducted a best practice study reviewing the homeless Antonio Housing Authority and Rapid Re-housing toservices in 12 states and the District of Columbia and individuals who are in danger of becoming homeless.visited 237 of these homeless facilities. While San An-tonio and other communities have services to help 3.5 SITE BACKGROUNDthe homeless, they are spread across the city limit- San Antonio has a disproportionately large numbering their accessibility to the homeless since most lack of homeless owing to the hospitable weather and thebasic transportation and many cannot afford public numerous military installations in the city and Texastransportation. The Board concluded that having a overall. Many homeless in San Antonio are veteranscampus with all supportive services in one location that were once locally stationed and returned to ais the most efficient and effective way to help the familiar location after becoming homeless. The West-homeless transform their lives. side District where Haven for Hope is located had long been an area suffering from 43.8% poverty and3.4 PROJECT COMPONENTS homelessness, and 14.5% unemployment.The 37-acre Haven for Hope Campus is adjacent to theCentral Business District, one mile west of downtown In selecting a project site, Haven for Hope, BexarSan Antonio. The location is a formerly depressed in- County sought proximity to jobs and training oppor-dustrial area with a large population of homeless. The tunities as well as existing homeless populations. Thecampus will eventually operate 15 main buildings and district chosen was largely composed of underutilizedcourtyards to co-locate the services of 78 governmen- and vacant light-industrial/warehouse-type facilities.tal, non-profit, and faith-based service providers as Homeless had already begun to frequent these aban-well as the residential facilities. doned buildings. Further, the University Health Care System is nearby and plans to expand to better serveI.The Homeless Transformational Campus the mentally ill. The current Campus was adjacent toProvides mental health counseling and many key the existing American GI Forum (AGIF) that needed totransformational services, including certificate train- expand and is now part of the campus, and within 2-3ing programs, vocational training programs, religious blocks of the prior site of SAMMinistries, the campus’and spiritual resources, a cardio center, a post office residential provider for the men’s, women’s and fam-and even a pet kennel. The campus also has four resi- ily housing.dences designated for men, women, veterans, andfamily housing. To handle initial opposition the project worked close- ly with the city and local community on the plans.II. The Prospect’s CourtyardProvides the homeless with a “safe shelter” for those 3.6 PROJECT FINANCINGwith immediate and critical needs, in order to get To secure the $103.7 million Phase I financing for ac-them off the streets. Three meals a day are provided, quisition, redevelopment and new construction, Hav-along with showers, restrooms, day services, and a en for Hope partnered with various public and privatechapel. entities to secure loans (market and below market), grants, donations, and $9.2 million tax credit subsidyIII. Support Services to the Community ($40 million in allocation), overcoming significant fi-Provides medical, dental, vision, and psychiatry ser- nancial hurdles that had stymied previous buildingvices not just to campus residents, but to the pub- redevelopment efforts.lic based on income qualifications. Sobering andsubstance-abuse detoxification services, childcare,education and drug court are available to the pub-HAVEN FOR HOPE PAG E | 5
  9. 9. 2.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY4.1 ECONOMIC IMPACT The Empowered Case Management software systemThe Haven for Hope Campus project generated ap- utilized by Haven for Hope to track its program’s out-proximately 300 FTE construction jobs, with average comes will provide a new data source to examine thewages of $35,000, totaling approximately $10.5 mil- approach to treatment of homelessness for nationallion in payroll. These construction jobs went to lo- study. The data can be used by both the Departmentcal San Antonio construction workers, a majority of of Community Initiative’s HMIS and Haven for Hopewhom are minorities. Minority-owned construction to assess the effectiveness of different programs infirms were also used for the construction project. helping homeless individuals become self supportive. No other program will produce such a wealth of data.The project created 150 new permanent jobs, in additionto the 200 pre-existing permanent jobs among H4HBC 4.4 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTand 78 partnering agencies and generates over $116 The adaptive reuse of nine buildings allowed for themillion of payroll over 20 years. conservation of construction materials and waste from existing buildings that would otherwise go to4.2 FISCAL IMPACT landfills. The six new and nine existing buildings in-The tax revenues generated by the construction costs corporate a variety of technologies which lower thetotal $6.1 million in local, state, and federal tax rev- need for electricity and water such as Energy Star®enues. The local, state, and federal tax revenue gener- Roofs and double pane/low E glass. Each building re-ated from operations totals $0.8 million net annually, duces annual CO2 emissions by between 15 and 75or a net $16.5 million over 20 years. Haven for Hope’s tons. The area also housed a local waste dump whichDetox Center keeps the homeless out of the legal sys- has been contained and the area cleaned. Their recy-tem and jail, where municipal costs are generated. cling project will be one of the largest in the city dueSince opening ahead of the campus, it has saved over to the size of the campus.$12 million in jail, emergency room and court diver-sions. CONCLUSIONIncorporating the cost savings benefits of the cam- On any given night there will be roughly 1,600 indi-pus, taxpayers will recoup their net $248 million in lo- viduals residing on the Haven for Hope Campus. Thecal, state, and federal subsidy by Year 6. By Year 20 the now complete Phase I campus realizes the originalproject will have generated an additional $2.7 billion vision by co-locating fundamental services; it exceedsin net new tax revenues. This equals a 1105% taxpayer the original vision by providing critical services toreturn on investment, relative to the taxpayer’s initial low-income residents in the area. The initial Campusnet subsidy. For this project the internal rate of return has already helped transform and save lives in Bexarto the taxpayers on their $248 million investment will County. Over 15,000 San Antonio residents have re-be 72%. ceived medical, dental, and/or substance abuse ser- vices. Further, the project has served to revitalize the4.3 SOCIAL/COMMUNITY IMPACT surrounding neighborhood.Haven for Hope has dramatically improved the sur-rounding area through elimination of vacant, derelict Phases II-III will develop affordable, supportive rentalproperties, including a former waste dump, all for- housing units furthering the impact of this transfor-merly frequented by homeless and substance abus- mational campus.ers. H4H serves as a stabilizing anchor tenant for thecommunity. Since its inception the free clinics haveserved over 15,000 with medical, vision, and dentalservices worth $2 million.HAVEN FOR HOPE PAG E | 6
  10. 10. 2.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 3.0 HAVEN FOR HOPE CAMPUSA NEW APPROACH TO Haven for Hope was specifically designed toHOMELESSNESS tackle the root causes of homelessness, not just the symptoms.3.1 PROJECT OVERVIEW Phase I of the Haven for Hope Campus cost $104 mil-Haven for Hope of Bexar County, Texas is the larg- lion. This phase adapted and constructed 15 buildingest, most comprehensive Homeless Transformation on the 37 acre site. In total there is more than half ofCampus in the United States. The conceptualization a million square feet of service space. On any givenof the campus began in 2006; the completion of all night there will be roughly 1,600 individuals residingconstruction phases, given its scale and fundraising on the Haven for Hope Campus. The now completeneeds, will not be until 2015. Phase I campus realizes the original vision by co-lo- cating fundamental services; it exceeds the original vision by providing critical services to low-income residents in the area. The initial Campus has already helped transform and save lives in Bexar County. Over 15,000 San Antonio residents have received medical, dental, and/or substance abuse services. Effective treatment also reduces the number of homeless in- dividuals in the criminal justice and public medical systems.  Further, the project has served to revitalize the surrounding neighborhood through its addition of high quality new construction of six buildings and the renovation of nine abandoned buildings.The vision for the Campus is to provide a wide rangeof social services addressing the needs of San Anto- Phases II-III will begin in Summer 2011. The $22 mil-nio’s homeless community (25,000 annually). The lion Phase II and III will develop affordable, support-new campus realizes this vision by integrating many ive rental housing units. Phase II will create 140 unitscritical services into a single multiservice-campus set- expected to be completed by 2012. Phase III will cre-ting.  Most importantly, while Haven for Hope pro- ate an additional 60 units by 2015. Residents will payvides shelter, food, and clothing to the homeless, it is below market-based rents and continue to receivespecifically designed to tackle the root causes of services to help them fully transition from living onhomelessness. Seventy eight nonprofit and govern- campus to living independently in the community.ment Partner agencies (40 housed on site) provide a Phases II-III are currently under review of the com-wide-array of critical services, including: education, munity and City to establish support and to ensurejob training, day care, substance abuse treatment, zoning and permits.medical care,  identification recovery, case manage-ment and animal care services. (See full listing in Ap-pendix D)HAVEN FOR HOPE PAG E | 7
  11. 11. 2.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY3.2 SPONSOR H4H is governed by an independent Board of Directors. BACKGROUND The Board then appoints the President to oversee the facility’s operations. Bill Greehey was selected as Found-ORGANIZATIONAL HISTORY ing Chairman and Patti Radle was selected as Vice-Chair-In 2006, San Antonio Mayor Phil Hardberger and Bill woman.Greehey, a business and civic leader, met to discussthe serious and growing problem of homelessness in One of the Board’s first actions was to hire Dr. RobertBexar County. The county’s homeless population was Marbut Jr. as the President/CEO in December 2006. Dr. estimated to be higher than Marbut is a tenured professor at Northwest Vista Col- any other county in Texas; ef- lege and has previous experience serving as a White fectively assisting this popula- House staffer under President George H.W. Bush, tion was gaining increasing Chief of Staff for Special Projects and Politics for importance.  As a result of this Mayor Henry Cisneros and city councilmember and meeting, Mayor Hardberger Mayor Pro-Tem of San Antonio. Under Dr. Marbut’s di- established the Community rection, he and a team of community representatives Council to End Homelessness as well as agencies providing services to the homes- composed of community and less and food assistance spent 18 months conducting Dr. Marbut business leaders who were a national best practices study, visiting 237 homelesscharged with developing a plan to reduce homeless- centers across the country. The study was completedness in San Antonio. The group, led by Dr. Robert Mar- June 2007 (See Appendix K for Executive Summary).but Jr., conducted extensive research on homeless- With the hiring of Dr. Marbut, H4HBC began intensiveness detailed in Section 3.3. fundraising efforts to acquire land to build the H4H campus. While portions of the campus were openedIn November 2006, at the recommendation of the and operational beginning as early as 2008, Phase ICommunity Council to End Homelessness and construction was completed and the grand openingthrough the leadership of Bill Greehey, Haven for was held on April 14, 2010.Hope of Bexar County (H4HBC) was formed as an in-dependent 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. Its mis- In June 2010 George Block,sion: to transform and save lives. formerly the organization’s Chief Operating Officer and Vice President, took over as Mission: To provide homeless individuals and CEO on an interim basis forfamilies with the training, skills and assistance Dr. Marbut, who is now focus- needed to help them become self-sufficient, ing on the next phase of theand to do so in cost-effective and sustainable Haven for Hope master plan, manner. George Block which is affordable housing for those who graduate from the transformation program. On September 8, 2010,As its first step towards achieving its mission, the or- Mr. Block was unanimously selected by the Board ofganization would focus on developing the Haven for Directors to continue as CEO of Haven for Hope on aHope Campus. This multi-service center designed to permanent basis. Prior to joining Haven for Hope onserve the holistic life needs of homeless individuals July 1, 2009 Mr. Block was an educator and successfuland families in the San Antonio-Bexar County. To do coach in San Antonio for 36 years, and was heavilyso involved coordinated between faith-based, govern- involved in the community. Mr. Block is one of thement, and non-profit groups. Haven for Hope is the founders of the San Antonio Sports Foundation andonly facility that combines all three under one roof. Voices for Children - San Antonio, an early childhood advocacy organization.  HAVEN FOR HOPE PAG E | 8
  12. 12. 3.0 HAVEN FOR HOPE CAMPUS “I was hooked in two weeks. I signed on as an employee two months later. What hooked me was just listening about the mission and the completeness of it. This is a mission thatserves the homeless with dental care, eye care, child care, detox, everything.” -S T E V E O S WA L D , C H I E F F I N A N C I A L O F F I C E RH4H offers an array of services to the homelessthrough its program agreements with nonprofit andgovernment partner agencies. H4HBC is achieving itsmission and goal through the creation of the Havenfor Hope Campus, which provides a wide array of crit-ical social services on a centralized campus.See Appendix F for further information on key organi-zational members. From left: County Judge Nelson Wolff, Patti Radle, Bill Greehey, Mayor Phil Hardberger, City Manager Sheryl SculleyHAVEN FOR HOPE PAG E | 9
  13. 13. 3.0 HAVEN FOR HOPE CAMPUS3.3 PROJECT IMPETUS TABLE 2: HOMELESSNESS IN SAN ANTONIO – THE COMMUNITY NEED 10UNDERSTANDING THE PROBLEMHomelessness is a social problem that has only re- Each year, 25,000 in San Antonio are homeless; almost 4,000 on any given nightcently begun to be better understood. Researchsuggests that as many as 80% of the homeless are 47% of the homeless are families with childrenin and out of shelters in a matter of days and typi- 12% of homeless families cite domestic violence as thecally do not come back.6 However, among the re- reasonmaining 20% are the chronically homeless - those 37% of the homeless are children (2003 CoC Census); aver-with mental and physical disabilities and serious age age of the homeless is just 9 yearssubstance abuse problems that place an enormous 30% of the homeless are U.S. veteransfinancial strain on social and healthcare services.One University of California, San Diego Medical Cen- Over 60% of homeless suffer from mental illness and / or substance abuse; Texas ranks 49th in per capita funding forter study followed a group of chronically homeless mental health servicesindividuals for 18 months and found that over that 27% of the homeless are employed, but nearly half of themperiod each individual had on average almost 28 earn less than $350 per monthemergency-room visits and hospital bills of $100,000.7 80% of San Antonio residents are just one paycheck from possible homelessnessAt the other end of the spectrum are the transition-ally homeless who experience a major event such as From 2005-2006 Texas had the highest number of homeless children11a job loss, home fire, or domestic violence incidentand only need a small amount of support beforegetting back on their feet. Because the chronically UNDERSTANDING POSSIBLEhomeless vary so significantly from the transition- SOLUTIONSally homeless, it is difficult to estimate what the av- From 2006 - June 2007, the Haven for Hope plannerserage homeless person costs the public. The nearby undertook extensive research to guide their futureUniversity of Texas conducted a two-year survey that efforts in building a homeless facility. The need forfound the cost of healthcare for one homeless per- a “single-stop” concept became clear as Haven forson to be $23,223 per year in 2010 dollars although Hope planners conducted a best practice study re-this figure is likely to be understated as the rate of viewing the homeless services in 12 states and thehealthcare price increases has outpaced general infla- District of Columbia and visited 237 of these home-tion in the time since the survey was conducted.8 In less facilities throughout the country. Campuses inand around the San Antonio area, it estimated that San Diego, Miami, Phoenix and St. Louis were amongthe number of homeless people in the Bexar County some of the operations reviewed and analyzed to de-Jail system is around 450 per night. At a base cost velop a set of operational best practices. of $50 per night this equals an annual cost of $8.2million. In healthcare, the Baptist Health System The study indicated that treating the root causes ofrecorded $610,680 in care provided to homeless pa- homelessness (unemployment, mental illness, sub-tients over a one year period beginning in 2006.9 Al- stance abuse, domestic violence, poverty, a lack of afthough it is very difficult to separate out the effect, fordable housing and limited life skills) with a widehomelessness also entails indirect costs to a region array of social services in a single and central loca-by negatively affecting economic activity in business tion resulted in a 60% success rate. Success is defineddistricts if people perceive these areas to be less safe. as a year of totally self-sufficient living. Additionally, the study showed a reduction in crime and increased property values as evidenced in the following cities:HAVEN FOR HOPE PAG E | 10
  14. 14. 3.0 HAVEN FOR HOPE CAMPUSPhoenix Facility (opened Fall 2005): H4H’S SEVEN GUIDING• Crime decreased by 19.5% from ’05-’06 PRINCIPLES:• Property values increased avg. 21% from ’06-’07 Through the “lessons learned,” Haven for Hope es- tablished the following guiding principles (these prin-San Diego Facility: ciples are outlined fully in Appendix E):• Crime decreased by 1.6% from ’05-’06; stable or 1. Move to a Culture of Transformation (versus the reduced rates every year for 25 years Old Culture of Warehousing• 85% of families do not return to the street 2. Co-location and Virtual E-integration of as Many• 70% of single adults get into permanent housing Services as Possible 3. Must Have a Master Case Management SystemMiami Facility (opened in 1995): that is Customized• Homeless population decreased nearly 88% (from 8,000 in 1993 to 994 in 2010) 4. Reward Positive Behavior• $40 million dining club and major motion picture 5. Consequences for Negative Behavior production studio built adjacent to the facility 6. External Activities Must be Redirected or Stopped where crack houses once stood 7. Panhandling Enables the Homeless and Must be StoppedWhile San Antonio and other communities have ser-vices to help the homeless, they are spread across It was determined that the facility should also be man-the city limiting their accessibility to the homeless aged by an independent board, free of political influencesince  most lack basic transportation and many can- and red tape. The Board concluded that having a campusnot afford public transportation.  For example, the with all supportive services in one location is the most ef-American GI Forum (AGIF) and Lifetime Recovery (for- ficient and effective way to help the homeless transformmerly Bexar ARC) were located five miles away from their lives.one another. Now they are housed on the same cam-pus in satellite offices at Haven for Hope. Also, sinceone service is often necessary to obtain others (eg.proper identification must be obtained to access jobplacement opportunities) the homeless are less likelyto take advantage of all the services available to them.  November 2006 Haven for Hope formed on recom- mendation of Community Council Summer 2003 June 2010 year 2012Mayor Ed Garza’s Task Force on Hunger Campus completely open to public Phase II Construction of 140 units complete and Homelessness established January 13, 2005 2006 – June 2007 September 2010 Task Force presents 10-year Haven planning group conducts George Block named plan to City Council “best practice” study permanent CEO Fall 2003 December 2006 June 2010 year 2011 San Antonio City Council appro- Dr. Robert Marbut Jr. named George Block takes over Phase II Construction priates $1.014 million for hunger President & CEO as interim CEO for Dr. begins prevention and support services in Robert Marbut, Jr. response to short-term Task Force recommendations year 2015 Early 2006 Phase III Construction of an addi - April 2010 tional 60 units complete Community Council to End Homelessness Haven for Hope Campus established by Mayor Phil Hardberger Grand OpeningHAVEN FOR HOPE PAG E | 11
  15. 15. 3.0 HAVEN FOR HOPE CAMPUS3.4 HAVEN FOR HOPE CAMPUS PHASE I CAMPUS COMPONENTSThe 37-acre Haven for Hope Campus is adjacent to the The H4H Campus is composed of three core func-Central Business District, one mile west of downtown tional areas designed to serve homeless clients, low-San Antonio. The location is a formerly depressed in- income community residents, as well as the generaldustrial area with a large population of homeless. The San Antonio population:campus will eventually include approximately 440,000square feet of space, with 15 separate buildings andcourtyards to co-locate the services of 78 governmen-tal, non-profit, and faith-based service providers aswell as the residential facilities. I. THE HOMELESS TRANSFORMATIONAL CAMPUS The Homeless Transformational Center is the heart of the campus. This 65,000 square foot multi-building complex provides mental health counseling and manyThe entire campus is physically arranged to support other key transformational services. There is an arraythe holistic multi-step transition from homelessness of certificate training programs, including GED andto achieving self supportive shelter and employment. English as a Second Language (ESL) classes provided by The San Antonio Independent School District, vo- cational training programs provided by Alamo College and partners, religious and spiritual resources, a car- Client Profile: Steve Guzman ran a land- dio center, and a post office. The facility even includes scaping business until someone ran a red a pet kennel. These services are critical to helping the light and plowed into his pickup, totaling homeless transition to mainstream society. the truck and destroying his equipment. One key deterrent to homeless people seeking help The driver didn’t have insurance, and nei- is that facilities do not allow pets. Haven for Hope ther did Guzman. So he ended up on the has sought to eliminate this barrier to transformation streets. Three months later at Haven for by providing a kennel onsite. However, not everyone Hope, he’s planning to become an X-ray can bring a pet. Applicants go through an evaluation technician. “You got to keep busy,” Guz- process, which includes meeting the animal, check- man said. “Otherwise you’ll never get out ing vaccinations and learning the animal’s history. If of the program, and that’s what I want to approved, they must follow rules that include daily see.”12 feedings, grooming, washing down kennels and set- ting up monthly health checks.HAVEN FOR HOPE PAG E | 12
  16. 16. 3.0 HAVEN FOR HOPE CAMPUS formational Campus. The Prospects Courtyard will eventually have a night- ly capacity of 500 individuals, who will usually sleep outdoors on mats, with an indoor housing facility for inclement weather. The Prospects Courtyard accepts inebriated individuals who San Antonio police officers would otherwise be forced to spend hours process- ing into holding tanks and traditional homeless shel- ters. For this reason, security will be prominent in the Courtyard. Marion Wright’s dog Rudy is one of 10 dogs and two cats kept at Haven for Hope. “If Ha- ven didn’t have a kennel, I wouldn’t be there,” “This is where I live. It makes me feel good. At Wright said. “My dog calms me down.”13 least I’ve got a place to lay my head.” - S T E V E N O R M A N , 49, a Navy veteran who suffers from schizophrenia, depression and other mental illnesses.14 While Steve may not be ready to make theThe campus also has four residences designated for full transformation, he now has a safe place to sleep andmen, women, veterans, and family housing. These bathe, meals, and is off the street.include rooms with multiple bunks as well as SingleResidence Occupancies (SRO) which are temporarysupportive housing. SROs include a bed, desk, closet, Prospect Courtyard Guestmicrowave and fridge in the unit and share a commu- • Must be 18 years or oldernity kitchen, laundry and television room. The resi- • Can enter Courtyard 8 AM-10:00 PM when room isdence area includes a dining hall and cafeteria. available • Must be willing to go through security screeningII. THE PROSPECTS COURTYARD for drugs/alcohol/weaponsThe Courtyard provides the homeless with a “safe • Can stay on Courtyard indefinitely without a com-shelter” for those with immediate and critical needs, mitment to programin order to get them off the streets. Three meals a day • Can be “under the influence” but cannot bringare provided, along with showers, restrooms, day ser- substances on Courtyardvices, and a chapel. Protocols have been designed toencourage the individuals in the Prospect Courtyard III. SUPPORT SERVICES TO THE COMMUNITYto embrace transition into more permanent housing The campus provides medical, dental, vision, and psy-facilities – which would move them into the Home- chiatry services not just to campus residents, but toless Transitional Campus. For this reason, while they the public based on income qualifications. Soberingare given a safe place to stay and meals, they are not and substance-abuse detoxification services, child-provided full living amenities. Only upon these indi- care, education and drug court are available to theviduals embracing “transition” and committing to public regardless of income. The campus also providesthe rules and emerging member requirements can referrals to services in the community, such as Santhey move from the Courtyard to the Transformation- Antonio Housing Authority and Rapid Re-housing toal Campus. They are however provided a safe place individuals who are in danger of becoming homeless.to sleep outdoors and a cushioned sleeping mat, butdo not undergo the extensive treatment, educationand detoxification that is expected of those that havemade a commitment and therefore live in the Trans-HAVEN FOR HOPE PAG E | 13
  17. 17. 3.0 HAVEN FOR HOPE CAMPUSPROGRAMS: PROCESS AND SERVICES a client receives better living accomodations (suchPROVIDED as more personal storage space and larger sleepingMULTISTAGE SERVICE PROCESS quarters), campus privileges, free movie tickets, etc.When a client enters the residential program, from Similarly, not following set rules and guidelines hasthe street or transitioning from Prospects Courtyard negative consequences on privileges and opportu-they initiate a multistage process: nities available. To become an emerging member, a guest member must:Intake Interview/AsessmentProgram pathways are determined based on a “pri- • Successfully complete five assigned classes inmary presenting’”assessment, as opposed to diagno- seven dayssis. For instance someone who suffer from addiction • Commit to working up to 40 hours of productivewould begin the sobering program and life skills, work time each week on Campuswhereas someone who recently lost their job would • Commit to being drug and alcohol freemove through a different pathway. This assessment • Commit to working with a case manager toward asets individuals on particular pathways at the cam- goal of sustained, self-sufficient livingpus based on whether their homelessness is chronicor situational. After assessment a client can movethrough the various stages of services.“Guest Member”When entering the program, a client undergoes a one-week period during which he/she is transitioned tothe appropriate dorm (men, women, veteran, or fam-ily). Based on the initial assessment, the client alsobegins a series of program orientations, workshops, “I couldn’t believe all this place is for a home-intake services, goal setting sessions and interviews. less person,” Xavier Orosco said, surveying the cafeteria while waiting in line for breakfast.• Guest completes intake at Intake Department (1 “Look at this place. It’s like a Luby’s [Cafete- Haven for Hope Way) Mon-Fri 7AM-7 PM; Sat-Sun ria].” Now clean and sober after more than 10am-4pm• Must be 18 years or older or accompanied by a two decades of injecting heroin and cocaine, legal guardian Orosco’s dream is to own a bakery and deli.• Must have valid government issued ID With the help of Haven staff, he has applied• Must be drug and alcohol free for financial aid and is planning to attend St.• Cannot be a registered sex offender Philip’s College.15• Must be considered homeless by HUD definition: An individual who lacks a fixed, regular, and ad- equate nighttime residence.• Must be willing to participate in five classes in seven days on the Haven Campus to become a Guest Member“Emerging Member”If the client decides to continue, the program operateswithin a traditional reward and consequence system.When goals and targeted benchmarks are achieved,HAVEN FOR HOPE PAG E | 14
  18. 18. 3.0 HAVEN FOR HOPE CAMPUS • Includes emergency and long-term shelter • Designated areas for men, women, veterans and families • Designated areas for long-term supportive care for senior citizens and the sick and disabled Health This includes medical, dental, vision, mentalFamilies: health, substance abuse• For two-parent families, verification of marriage or detoxification center and a common law certificate must be presented to live drug treatment, hospice, together in a family dorm. nutrition, immunizations• Families with children will be given priority for Cam- and other preventative pus housing healthcare. While some of these services already existed in the community, theSpecific services are required for those living in the detox and drug treatment center is new as is the walk-infacility such as financial literacy and parenting edu- vision center. Those existing services such as Central Medcation, if they have children. Other services, such as have doubled in size and have extended their hours toeducation and job skills, are tailored to the specific accommodate the population they are serving, stayingneeds and goals of the client, as determined by client open until 10pm and opening on weekends.and case manager. Job / EmploymentUpon completion in August 2010, the Campus began Job skills, life skills courses, and job searching support.offering the following integrated and co-located ser- are all provided on Campus. Job training programs in-vices: clude: culinary, janitorial, painting, grounds/landscaping, and light maintenance. The culinary program has alreadyHousing graduated 16 of 32 enrollees in 8-week and 15-weekThe site features 998 beds and a sheltered courtyard classes, some of whom have already found employment.area with the capacity to eventually sleep around 500additional homeless individuals (approximately 1,600 Educationhomeless people will be able to reside on campus at Clients have access to GED workshops, ESL courses, As-any one time). sociates degree program, Library, learning center and tutoring support. Financial A credit union (still to be secured) and financial counsel- ing and education will be available onsite. Social Support Services Social services provided include: Hotline/crisis counsel- ing, emergency food, transportation, shelter, individual assessment/service planning, individual/group counsel- ing, advocacy and court/legal assistance, and public ben- efits (food stamps, social security income, etc.)HAVEN FOR HOPE PAG E | 15
  19. 19. 3.0 HAVEN FOR HOPE CAMPUS CORE CAMPUS SERVICE PROVIDERS The Campus is unique in concept and scale, provid- ing support services in one integrated campus where homeless as well as low-income and substance abus- ing residents can find critical life-changing support services at one location. The co-location and overall interconnectedness of 78 organizations leads to a high level of holistic support and data/idea exchangesLegal amongst service providers.St. Mary’s University provides a legal clinic and TexasRio Grande Legal Aid (TRLA) provides legal aid and INCREASED EFFICIENCY THROUGH CO-identification recovery assistance. LOCATION Haven for Hope of Bexar County (HFHBC) is respon-Case Management sible for both the development of the Campus and forCase Management Tracking System (CMTS) software its long-term oversight and management. H4HBC willis used to track services provided to the homeless. All provide the Campus coordination, general administra-services, such as substance abuse, counseling, edu- tion, master case management and centralized facilitiescation, vocational services, and spiritual counseling security and property management. HFHBC will provideare tracked through the CMTS software to monitor the necessary tools for service partners to deliver trans-program effectiveness and ensure services are coordi- formative services in a coordinated fashion: educationalnated and comprehensive. and job training/work study programs, spiritual services coordination, and IT services, including case manage-Spiritual ment coordination software and training. HFHBC alsoSpiritual care is provided through the unified efforts oversees the campus administration, finances, human re-and services of partners and volunteers. Haven for sources, and fundraising. Service partners are organizedHope recognizes that holistic healing and transfor- into three tiered groups levels, based on their relation-mation includes the spirit, the body, and the mind. ship and focus of service.There is a chapel building on campus and spiritualservices include: “PrayerNet” (prayer social network), The Haven for Hope campus increases the effectivenessMorning Prayer groups, prayer circles, faith-based of 78 nonprofit service providers, who are now able tocounseling, and access to San Antonio faith groups. collaborate (40 housed on-site). By bringing service providers together, H4H can realize its goal of treatingTargeted Population Services the root causes of homelessness. In 2009 alone, severalSpecialized services are provided such as, veterans thousand homeless individuals utilized shelter, coun-administration assistance and services, sexual abuse seling, substance abuse, and medical services.and violence intervention services, HIV/AIDS services,ex-offenders programs, pregnant teen services, dis- By providing one central location for so many criticalabled support, and animal kennel/shelter support. services, H4H has created programmatic efficiencies that enable each governmental, non-profit, and faithOther Services based service provider to increase its impact:Additional services provided to the Campus include:food services (including culinary training), childcare • Reduced rents and other overhead costscenter, after-school program and education, mail • Expanded service capacitycenter, barber shop, exercise and recreational areas, • Increased resourcesclothing closet/store area, telephone areas, central • Better coordination and tracking of clients - moretransportation desk, and outreach services. effective service overallHAVEN FOR HOPE PAG E | 16
  20. 20. 3.0 HAVEN FOR HOPE CAMPUS• Co-location -- client ease of receiving services is more effective and efficient• Higher quality facilities San Antonio Dental Clinic The Dental clinic was formed by two churchesTIER 1 SERVICE PARTNERS (9) and has existed for 20-25 years in the base-Tier I organizations offer primary services to the gen- ment of a church. The new space at Haven foreral client-base and/or serve as anchor service orga- Hope that houses the Dental clinic is triple thenizations at the campus. These entities usually main- size of their previous location. They have beentain larger facility space on-site and are responsiblefor the management and maintenance of their own able to expand their capacity by doubling thedesignated facilities: number of chairs from 8 to 16 and adding four surgery rooms.• American GI Forum (AGIF): The clinic has received major donations pro- The largest Federally Chartered Hispanic Veterans viding cutting-edge equipment. This in turn at- organization in the United States, providing educa- tracted dental students to unpaid internships tion and scholarship information• Center for Healthcare Services (CHCS): where they are exposed to this equipment and Mental health, developmental disability and sub- they assist homeless clients with top quality stance abuse services dental oversight. The clinic now pays $1 in• CentroMed: rent, but pays for upkeep of the common area Network of clinics providing medical, dental, behav- (still only 25% of market rate). ioral health (counseling) and nutritional services Another benefit to the clinic is that they have• I Care Services: Provides vision screening and corrective eyewear higher visibility in the community due to the• San Antonio Christian Dental Clinic: positive media attention, this visibility in- Provides dental care to adults in San Antonio who creases the amount and quantity of donations would otherwise go without received each year.• San Antonio Food Bank: Provides free food for the needy• SAMMinistries: Interfaith ministry whose mission is to help the home- less and those at risk of becoming homeless attain self-sufficiency by offering -- with dignity and compas- sion -- shelter, housing and services. Provides men’s, women’s, and family housing• Society of St. Vincent de Paul: Spiritually-focused charity organization (food services)• YMCA: Provides a child care center and after school pro- gramHAVEN FOR HOPE PAG E | 17
  21. 21. 3.0 HAVEN FOR HOPE CAMPUS SAVING AND TRANSFORMING “Since I’ve been at Haven for Hope, I’ve LIVES OF HOMELESSreceived Community Based Counseling that is helping me organize my life. I’ve been placed This year Davey “Blessed” Moreno was evictedon the waiting list for VASH which is a Section from the SAMMinistries shelter after he shat- 8 Voucher Program for homeless Veterans. tered a window. Arrested for possession of I may be about to get my own place to live marijuana then released he went from job to within two months. Anger Management is a job, inking tattoos in cheap motels for cash andrequired class here and I’ve learned more than feeding a substance addiction. About 6:30 a.m. I could have imagined. Every human being Wednesday, he is washing hundreds of trays in needs this class. I also got new glasses and I the Food Bank’s massive, stainless-steel kitch- can see so much better.” – M A R I A D O O L I T T L E en on the new campus for the homeless. It’s a job he volunteers for every morning, arriv-TIER II SERVICE PARTNERS ing before sunrise and waiting to eat breakfast(34 PARTNERS) until after his fellow residents have eaten. “IThese organizations provide secondary services and/ like it,” he said. “It’s like a college atmosphere.or niche services targeting specialized populations That’s why I’m volunteering.”16(disabled, HIV/AIDS, rape crisis, animal shelter, etc.).They offer their services on-site, but unlike Tier Iproviders who function semi-independently, H4HBCmaintains their on-campus space and manages theiroverhead.COMMUNITY REFERRALS(35 PARTNERS)These are community-based referral agencies thathave entered into partnership agreements with H4H-BC. Their services are mainly provided at off-campussites within the greater San Antonio area in coordina- Studies show that up to 80% of people who becometion with the H4H campus and the Tier I and II Part- homeless can quickly regain self-sufficiency if they re-ners, and utilize the same case management tracking ceive supportive services such as those found at Ha-software. Bus tickets are provided to those who can- ven for Hope. Following best practices based on thor-not afford to travel to off-site providers. ough research on homelessness and substance abuse, the campus provides holistic treatment by combin-For a full listing of all partners see Appendix D. ing: Housing, Food, Health, Job/Employment, Educa- tion, Financial, Social Support Services, Case Manage- ment, Spiritual and Targeted Population Services “We need to respect the individual, but not within a single campus. Since becoming operational respect the condition of homelessness,” (April 14,2010) the following has occurred on-site: -R O B E R T M A R B U T , D I R E C T O R O F H AV E N F O R H O P E ’ S SUPPORTIVE HOUSING • Over 1,900 people have entered the campus; • 6,300 medical care visits • 7,700 dental appointments; and • 1,200 vision exams/care.HAVEN FOR HOPE PAG E | 18
  22. 22. 3.0 HAVEN FOR HOPE CAMPUSNEW TEST MODELS for Hope met with all of their service providers andResearch conducted by the Haven for Hope founders the greater community continuum of care to gatherrevealed that the majority of homeless people (37%) their business and funding requirements in order toare actually children; 30% are veterans; 60% suffer build a system that could produce tailored forms andfrom mental illness and/or substance abuse; and 27% reports. The ECM system was designed in partnershipare employed, but earn too little to afford shelter. To with Empowered Solutions Group, a leading provideraddress the different needs of these diverse home- of Social Impact Technology software.less groups, H4H combines the best practices foundat over 150 facilities throughout the US into a single Currently, 40 organizations can log-on to the ECM sys-multiservice campus setting. tem to input direct client data. There are 300 users, including: • Resource Monitors “ When you can tie sobriety to getting a job, • Case Managers (and) a GED, the incentives are tremendous” • Security K AT H R Y N J O N E S , H AV E N FOR HOPE DIREC TOR OF • Mental Health Advisors S U B S TA N C E A B U S E S E R V I C E S . • Substance Abuse Advisors • Job Training Personnel • Education PersonnelAnn Hutchinson Meyers, PhD, Haven’s for Hope’s pre-viously Vice President of Transformational Services,has been instrumental in ensuring that H4H does not FIGURE 1: ECM SOFTWARE COST SAVINGSmerely become a large homeless shelter with a fewservices, but a test model where research is conduct-ed, data collected, and best practices can continue toemerge from the cross-fertilization of services. Ther-apists, substance abuse counselors, spiritual lead-ers, and educators all collaborate on techniques toaddress psychological challenges, personal trauma,substance abuse, personal economics, and career de-velopment. Specific programs also separately addressthe needs of children, families, and veterans.EMPOWERED CASE MANAGEMENT(ECM)Haven for Hope incorporates Case ManagementTracking Software to both track services and moreimportantly, to monitor and assess outcomes. Thisweb-based software is a central repository for clientassessments, program enrollment, goal tracking, andservices provided. Initially, Haven for Hope utilizedan existing license-based Homeless ManagementInformation System (HMIS). This system was notmeeting the reporting needs of the campus and theapproximately $123,000 annual cost of licensing indi-vidual users ($40 an individual/month) was anotherfactor in the decision to build a new system. HavenHAVEN FOR HOPE PAG E | 19
  23. 23. 3.0 HAVEN FOR HOPE CAMPUS The benefit of using one database to store client in- “This tracking system allows us to fully formation is the streamlining of a system that has a integrate and coordinate our efforts across tendency for duplication. Providers are able to make multiple service providers while collecting real time referrals and schedule appointments utiliz- data that give us a real and complete ing a common calendar. The centralized case man- understanding, from a qualitative and a agement enables each organization that receives a re-dollar amount, of the impact of our work with ferral to access the care that has been provided to anclients and where we may be able to improve. individual as well as the treatment plan that has been – SCOT T ACKERSON, VICE PRESIDENT OF created and initiated. The data can be used by both T R A N S F O R M AT I O N A L S E R V I C E S the Department of Community Initiative’s HMIS and Haven for Hope to assess the effectiveness of differ- ent programs in helping homeless individuals become self supportive. (For a sample report see Appendix H) Campus Men’s Emergency Dorm bunk and lockerHAVEN FOR HOPE PAG E | 20
  24. 24. 3.0 HAVEN FOR HOPE CAMPUS3.5 SITE BACKGROUND The City of San Antonio, with a population of 1.3 mil-AREA/NEIGHBORHOOD HISTORY lion, is the 2nd largest city in Texas and 7th largest city in the United States. It encompasses approxi- TABLE 3: CORE PROJECT DETAILS mately 467 square miles geographically within BexarAREA PROFILE County. Haven for Hope’s campus is located 1.2 miles Location San Antonio, Texas west of San Antonio’s Central Business District. It is Downtown - Adjacent bounded by Ruiz Street to the north, North Frio and Area to the Central Business Salado streets to the east, and the Union Pacific Rail- District road to the south and west. The heart of the campus Site Status Underutilized lies at the intersection of Perez and Comal streets. Previous Use Light Industrial Degree of Blight Severe I. THE NEED Unemployment Rate 17 14.5% San Antonio has a disproportionately large number of Area Median Income18 51.5% homeless - nearly 4,000 on any given night - owing to Poverty Rate19 43.8% the hospitable weather and the numerous military in- Enterprise Zone, Higher stallations in Texas and San Antonio. Many homeless Special Economic Zones Distress, Targeted Popula- in San Antonio are veterans that were once locally sta- tion tioned and have chosen to return to a familiar loca- Need to Gain Political tion after becoming homeless. The Westside District Support; Environmental Barriers to Development where Haven for Hope is located had long been an Clean-Up of Soil Contami- nation area suffering from deep poverty and homelessness.BUILDING AREA BREAKDOWN The area also has a very high population density. In Residential Areas 118,208 sq ft 2007 the Westside’s population was 106,481 - almost Transformational Services 75,700 sq ft twice the population of comparison areas in San Food Services 15,987 sq ft Antonio. The population is over 95% Hispanic with Child Care 13,706 sq ft a median age of 30 years. Additionally, almost 35% Public Safety Triage / Detox of the adult population has less than a ninth grade 10,684 sq ft Center education and nearly 58% do not have a high school COSA 10,595 sq ft diploma. Median income is $25,160 in comparison GI Forum Vets 9,569 sq ft with $42,335 in the Northside. Only 2.3% of Westside Community Court 4,647 sq ft residents over 25 are college graduates, compared to SAPD 800 sq ft 23% citywide.20 Area poverty is 43.8% with 14.5% un- TOTAL INDOOR 259,856 sq ft employment. Additionally, Bexar County had lobbied unsuccessfully for years to obtain funding for a detox Warehouse 46,900 sq ft center. Prospects Courtyard 28,157 sq ft Members’ Courtyards 11,910 sq ft II. SITE SELECTION Outdoor Multipurpose Area 8,000 sq ft The site search was conducted in 2007. In selecting a Golf Carts / Segway Parking 5,400 sq ft project site, H4HBC sought a site with 37 contiguous Child Care Playgrounds 4,400 sq ft acres. Two of the 22 sites put forward were seriously Garbage and Recycling Area 1,200 sq ft considered. The industrial and warehouse district Kennels 1,097 sq ft in which Haven for Hope has been built is an ideal TOTAL OUTDOOR 107,064 sq ft location for the large 37-acre campus. The site chosen has the advantage of being close to downtown, providing proximity to jobs, training opportunitiesHAVEN FOR HOPE PAG E | 21
  25. 25. 3.0 HAVEN FOR HOPE CAMPUSand existing homeless populations. The campus site of SAMMinistries, the campus’ residential pro-area was largely composed of underutilized and vider for the men’s, women’s and family housing.vacant light-industrial/warehouse-type facilities.Ten campus buildings already existed (see Table III. EXISTING HOMELESS SERVICES4) and most were vacant and in poor condition. F SAMMinistries provides an array of programs and ser- vices available to the homeless of San Antonio, Texas. FIGURE 2: HAVEN FOR HOPE CENSUS TRACT Programs include life skills, job training, financialIGURE 2: HAVEN FOR HOPE CENSUS TRACT management, computer skills, and parenting classes. Guests have access to medical and dental facilities and each program is designed to provide guests with the basic tools necessary to return to the path of self- sufficiency. In 2003, the San Antonio Metropolitan Ministries (SAMMinistries), a residential provider, re- ported turning away 40 families per month for emer- gency shelter. The AGIF, established in 1948 by Dr. Hector Perez Gar- cia, an Army Veteran Medical Doctor, is the largest Federally Chartered Hispanic Veterans organization in the United States with Chapters in 40 States and Puerto Rico. The AGIF supports education, youth lead- ership, employment opportunities, civil and human rights and their legislation. IV. OBTAINING COMMUNITY SUPPORT NIMBY-ism (“Not in My Backyard”) and homeless centers are oftentimes inseparable. Communities often fear such projects will attract an even greater number of homeless who would then drift from the campus into the neighborhood, bringing blights such HAVEN FOR HOPE, 1 Haven for Hope Way San Antonio, TX 78207 as crime and trash. Haven for Hope was no exception. Much of this community opposition was placated by CENSUS TRACT 0600, Poverty: 43.8%, Unemployment: 14.5% the strong support of leaders such as Bill Greehey, who understood that H4H would not be just another DOWNTOWN SAN ANTONIO homeless shelter.Homeless had already begun to frequent aban-doned buildings there as businesses began to de-cline due to economic downturns. Further, theUniversity Health Care System is nearby and plansto expand to better serve the mentally ill. The cur-rent Campus was also attractive because of the pre-existing homeless services provided in the area. Thesite was adjacent to the existing American GI Fo-rum (AGIF) that needed to expand and is now partof the campus, and within 2-3 blocks of the priorHAVEN FOR HOPE PAG E | 22

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