LANGUAGE TESTING ESCUELA : NOMBRES: Inglés Mgs. Vanessa Toro G. BIMESTRE: Primer Octubre 2011-Febrero 2012
Unit 1 Testing, testing… What is a language test? <ul><li>Brown (2004) suggested that “a test is a method of measuring a p...
 
Tests according to the method <ul><ul><li>Multiple-choice questions with  prescribed correct answers.  </li></ul></ul><ul>...
Types of test according to the method <ul><li>Paper-and-language tests. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Assess separate components  ...
Types of test according to the method <ul><li>Performance tests. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Language skills are assessed in an ...
Types of test according to their purpose <ul><li>Achievement tests: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Are related to classroom lessons...
Types of test according to their purpose <ul><li>Proficiency tests: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Test global competence in a lang...
Validity <ul><li>The test measures what we intend to measure.  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>For example: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><...
Unit 2 Communication and the design  of language tests <ul><li>Tests  are  designed according to the view they take . </li...
<ul><li>Discrete-Point Tests </li></ul><ul><li>Test aspects of knowledge in isolation  ( skills   of listening, speaking, ...
Integrative tests The   necessity of assessing practical language skills and the need of measuring productive capacities f...
Integrative tests <ul><li>Cloze tests :  </li></ul><ul><li>Every sixth or seventh word in a reading passage  (150 to 300 w...
Communicative Language Tests Hymes’s theory of communicative competence greatly expanded the scope of what was covered by ...
Communicative language tests came to have two features :  <ul><li>They were performance tests, requiring assessment to be ...
Models of communicative ability <ul><li>Grammatical competence, knowledge of systematic features of grammar, lexis, and ph...
  Unit 3
The Testing Cycle <ul><li>Before designing a test, consider what physical and financial resources are available for test d...
Test content <ul><li>Establishing test content involves careful sampling from the domain of the test, that is, the set of ...
Test method <ul><li>Consider the way in which candidates will be required to interact with the test materials, particularl...
<ul><li>Fixed response formats </li></ul><ul><li>In this type of format, the candidates’ possible responses have been anti...
<ul><li>Constructed response formats </li></ul><ul><li>This type of formats do not constrain the candidate to the same deg...
The testing of productive skills <ul><li>In the testing of productive skills, a further range of  test method  decisions n...
Test Specifications <ul><li>These are a set of instructions for creating the test, written as if they are to be followed b...
Test  trials <ul><li>This stage involves trying out the test materials and procedures prior to their use under operational...
Unit 4 The rating process <ul><li>Ratings are necessarily subjective; however, they can be made objective  if the rating c...
Rating Scales <ul><li>A rating scale is an ordered set of descriptions of typical performances in terms of their quality, ...
Aspects of performance considered: overall communicative efectiveness
Rating scales <ul><li>The rating scale shown before is used as part of a screening procedure (used to determine if an over...
The rating process
Analytic  rating
Holistic rating
References <ul><li>Georgia State University. (n.d.).  Rubrics.  Retrieved from http://www2.gsu.edu/ </li></ul><ul><li>~mst...
 
<ul><li>PROGRAMA:  Language Testing  Carrera:  Inglés  </li></ul><ul><li>Fecha:  16 de noviembre de 2011 </li></ul><ul><li...
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UTPL-LENGUAGE TESTING-I-BIMESTRE-(OCTUBRE 2011-FEBRERO 2012)

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Universidad Técnica Particular de Loja
Carrera: Inglés
Docente: Mgs. Vanessa Toro
Ciclo:Sexto
Bimestre: Primero

Published in: Education, Technology

UTPL-LENGUAGE TESTING-I-BIMESTRE-(OCTUBRE 2011-FEBRERO 2012)

  1. 1. LANGUAGE TESTING ESCUELA : NOMBRES: Inglés Mgs. Vanessa Toro G. BIMESTRE: Primer Octubre 2011-Febrero 2012
  2. 2. Unit 1 Testing, testing… What is a language test? <ul><li>Brown (2004) suggested that “a test is a method of measuring a person’s ability, knowledge or performance in a given domain” </li></ul>
  3. 4. Tests according to the method <ul><ul><li>Multiple-choice questions with prescribed correct answers. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A writing prompt with a scoring rubric </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>An oral interview: question script, expected responses. </li></ul></ul>The method must be explicit and structured.
  4. 5. Types of test according to the method <ul><li>Paper-and-language tests. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Assess separate components of language knowledge (grammar, vocabulary) or of receptive understanding (listening and reading comprehension) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Format of paper-and-language tests. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Multiple-choice task </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cloze tess </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Blank filling test </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Dichotomous items </li></ul></ul>
  5. 6. Types of test according to the method <ul><li>Performance tests. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Language skills are assessed in an act of oral communication </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They are most commonly tests </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>of speaking and writing. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Format of performance tests. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Samples of speech or writing are elicited from the test taker. They are judged by raters through agreed rating </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>procedures. </li></ul></ul>
  6. 7. Types of test according to their purpose <ul><li>Achievement tests: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Are related to classroom lessons, units, or even a total curriculum </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Determine whether course objectives have been met. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Determine whether appropriate knowledge and skills have been acquired. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Can be summative (final exams in a course) and formative (give comments and suggestions, call attention to an error, performance tasks, practice). </li></ul></ul>
  7. 8. Types of test according to their purpose <ul><li>Proficiency tests: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Test global competence in a language. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Test overall ability. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Consist of standardized multiple-choice items on grammar, vocabulary, reading and aural comprehension. (Include oral production performance). </li></ul></ul>
  8. 9. Validity <ul><li>The test measures what we intend to measure. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>For example: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>A valid test of reading ability measures reading ability nor previous knowledge in a subject. </li></ul></ul></ul>
  9. 10. Unit 2 Communication and the design of language tests <ul><li>Tests are designed according to the view they take . </li></ul><ul><li>Discrete point tests </li></ul><ul><li>Integrative and pragmatic tests </li></ul><ul><li>Communicative language tests </li></ul>
  10. 11. <ul><li>Discrete-Point Tests </li></ul><ul><li>Test aspects of knowledge in isolation ( skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, grammatical points, vocabulary, and aspects of pronunciation). </li></ul><ul><li>Atomize and descontextualize the knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>to be tested (isolated sentences) </li></ul>Early theories of test performance, influenced by structuralist linguistics, saw knowledge of language as consisting of mastery of the features of the language as a system.
  11. 12. Integrative tests The necessity of assessing practical language skills and the need of measuring productive capacities for language, led to a demand for language tests which involved an integrated performance on the part of the language user . The new orientation resulted in the development of tests which integrated knowledge of relevant systematic features of language (pronunciation, grammar, vocabulary) with an understanding of context.
  12. 13. Integrative tests <ul><li>Cloze tests : </li></ul><ul><li>Every sixth or seventh word in a reading passage (150 to 300 words) is deleted. </li></ul><ul><li>Words that fit into those blanks are supplied by the test-taker. </li></ul><ul><li>Cloze test results are good measures of overall proficiency. </li></ul><ul><li>Successful completion of cloze items taps into knowledge of vocabulary, grammatical structure, discourse structure, and reading skills and strategies. </li></ul>
  13. 14. Communicative Language Tests Hymes’s theory of communicative competence greatly expanded the scope of what was covered by an understanding of language and the ability to use language in context, particularly in terms of the social demands of performance. Hymes saw that knowing a language was more than knowing its rules of grammar.
  14. 15. Communicative language tests came to have two features : <ul><li>They were performance tests, requiring assessment to be carried out when the learner was engaged in an extended act of communication (receptive or productive). </li></ul><ul><li>They paid attention to the social roles candidates were likely to assume in real world setting, and offered a means of specifying the demands of such roles in detail. </li></ul>
  15. 16. Models of communicative ability <ul><li>Grammatical competence, knowledge of systematic features of grammar, lexis, and phonology. </li></ul><ul><li>Sociolinguistic competence, knowledge of rules of language use in terms of what is appropriate to different kinds of interlocutors, in different settings, and on different topics. </li></ul><ul><li>Strategic competence, the ability to compensate in performance for incomplete or imperfect linguistic resources in a second language. </li></ul><ul><li>Discourse competence, the ability to deal with extended use of language in context. </li></ul>
  16. 17. Unit 3
  17. 18. The Testing Cycle <ul><li>Before designing a test, consider what physical and financial resources are available for test development and test operation. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>For example: tests delivered via computer are not practical options where the technology is not available. </li></ul></ul>
  18. 19. Test content <ul><li>Establishing test content involves careful sampling from the domain of the test, that is, the set of tasks or the kinds of behaviours in the criterion setting. </li></ul><ul><li>For example, a test of the communicative abilities of health professionals in work settings will be based on representations of such workplace tasks as communicating with patients or other health professionals. </li></ul>
  19. 20. Test method <ul><li>Consider the way in which candidates will be required to interact with the test materials, particularly the response format, that is, the way in which the candidate will be required to respond to the material. </li></ul><ul><li>Fixed response formats </li></ul><ul><ul><li>MCQ format: (vocabulary and grammar) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>True-false format: (reading and listening x comprehension) </li></ul></ul>
  20. 21. <ul><li>Fixed response formats </li></ul><ul><li>In this type of format, the candidates’ possible responses have been anticipated and the candidates’ task is to choose the appropriate response from those offered. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Examples: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>- Multiple choice question format </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>- True or false format </li></ul></ul>
  21. 22. <ul><li>Constructed response formats </li></ul><ul><li>This type of formats do not constrain the candidate to the same degree, and reduce the effects of guessing. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Disadvantage </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cloze tests: another word may be acceptable. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Short answer questions: cannot be marked automatically. </li></ul></ul>
  22. 23. The testing of productive skills <ul><li>In the testing of productive skills, a further range of test method decisions need to be made, about the content and format of the stimulus to writing or speaking, the length and format of the responses, and about the scoring. (lectures, reading passages, etc.) </li></ul><ul><li>For example, speaking skills can be assessed through interviews, role plays, group discussions, etc. </li></ul>
  23. 24. Test Specifications <ul><li>These are a set of instructions for creating the test, written as if they are to be followed by someone other than the test developer. </li></ul><ul><li>They will include information on such matters as the length and structure of each part of the test, the type of materials with which candidates will have to engage, the source, the extend to which authentic materials will be altered, the response format, and </li></ul><ul><li>the test rubric. </li></ul>
  24. 25. Test trials <ul><li>This stage involves trying out the test materials and procedures prior to their use under operational conditions. </li></ul><ul><li>- Find a trial population. </li></ul><ul><li>- Use discrete point test items. </li></ul><ul><li>- Carry out a careful statistical analysis to investigate the items quality. </li></ul><ul><li>- For subjective judgments, there is a need for training raters.. </li></ul>
  25. 26. Unit 4 The rating process <ul><li>Ratings are necessarily subjective; however, they can be made objective if the rating category labels are clear and explicit, and the rater is trained carefully to interpret them in accordance with the intention of the test designers. </li></ul><ul><li>Rating scales are very necessary during the rating process. </li></ul>
  26. 27. Rating Scales <ul><li>A rating scale is an ordered set of descriptions of typical performances in terms of their quality, it is used by raters in rating procedures. </li></ul><ul><li>The preparation of such a scale involves developing level descriptors, that is describing in words performances that illustrate each level of competence defined on the scale. </li></ul>
  27. 28. Aspects of performance considered: overall communicative efectiveness
  28. 29. Rating scales <ul><li>The rating scale shown before is used as part of a screening procedure (used to determine if an overseas trained health professional has the necessary minimum language skills to be admitted under supervision to the clinical setting) </li></ul>
  29. 30. The rating process
  30. 31. Analytic rating
  31. 32. Holistic rating
  32. 33. References <ul><li>Georgia State University. (n.d.). Rubrics. Retrieved from http://www2.gsu.edu/ </li></ul><ul><li>~mstnrhx/457/rubric.htm </li></ul><ul><li>McNamara, T. (2008). Language Testing. , Oxford, NY: Oxford University Press. </li></ul><ul><li>Brown, D. (2004). Language Assessment: Principles and Classroom Practices. White Plains, NY: Pearson Education, Inc. </li></ul>
  33. 35. <ul><li>PROGRAMA: Language Testing Carrera: Inglés </li></ul><ul><li>Fecha: 16 de noviembre de 2011 </li></ul><ul><li>Docente: Mgs. Vanessa Toro. </li></ul><ul><li>Hora Inicio: 19h15 Hora Final: 20h15 </li></ul>GUIÓN DE PRESENTACIÓN Puntos de la Presentación Intervienen Duración Aprox. en minutos Material de Apoyo - Presentación - Objetivos Mgs. Vanessa Toro <ul><li>2 minutos </li></ul><ul><li>3 minutos </li></ul>Sin material. Sin material. <ul><li>Desarrollo del contenido: </li></ul><ul><li>Capítulo I </li></ul><ul><li>Capítulo II </li></ul><ul><li>…………… . </li></ul>Mgs. Vanessa Toro Estudiantes Language testing <ul><li>35 minutos </li></ul>Diapositivas (cambios cada 5 seg.), videos, otro o ningún material. - Preguntas - Despedida (Contactos, Sugerencias) <ul><li>Desarrollo del contenido: </li></ul><ul><li>Capítulo I </li></ul><ul><li>Capítulo II </li></ul><ul><li>…………… . </li></ul>Mgs. Vanessa Toro Estudiantes Language testing [email_address] 07 2 570 275 ext. 2934 Miércoles: 15h30-17h30 Jueves: 08h30 – 10h30

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