Portfolio showcase

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Portfolio showcase

  1. 1. The Showcase Portfolio for Student Teaching Profile Student Teaching Classroom Name: Vicki Judge School: Perry Meridian Middle School Hometown: Speedway, Indiana City: Indianapolis, Indiana Major: English Education Average Class Size: 25 License: Secondary English Education Cooperating Teacher: Mrs. Lesley McDougal School: Ball State University Ball State Supervisor: Mrs. Becky Gentry Location: Muncie Indiana II. Introduction Welcome to my Showcase Portfolio for Student Teaching. This portfolio documents my competence and accomplishments in the teaching field. It is a continuum of work that demonstrates my growth, displays my accomplishments and showcases my achievements as an educator. During my time at Perry Meridian Middle School I have had opportunities and experiences that have enriched my learning. I have participated in weekly professional development “clusters”, taught large group and small group instruction, performed classroom and non-instructional duties, and observed in classrooms throughout the school. By interacting with other teaching professionals, I have established my own beliefs and understanding of how to be the most successful teacher. Also, during my experience I have had the chance to design individual lessons, a unit, and rubrics utilizing different instructional strategies.
  2. 2. This experience has also opened my eyes to the real-world challenges that teachers and students face everyday. Some problems, such as weather conditions and environmental factors, are out of the teacher’s control. For example, this year’s unusually harsh winter forced an unprecedented amount of snow days onto Perry Meridian Middle’s academic calendar. The never ending rounds of high-stakes testing, both on the national and state level, left parents, teachers and students wondering how they would make up for all the lost instruction. The solution to this problem, adopted by the Metropolitan School District of Perry Township, included an additional 38- minutes tacked onto the end of every school day. This seemingly small addition reeked havoc on teacher and student’s schedules. It also represented a larger issue in education – the little things truly matter. I have experienced the highest highs and the lowest lows associated with the student teaching experience. However through all the highs and lows, I am appreciative to have been afforded this opportunity. Share in this experience by reading through my Portfolio Showcase, and allow me to demonstrate my growth and achievements as an educator. III. School Demographics and Classes Taught Perry Meridian Middle School is apart of the Metropolitan School District of Perry Township, which serves the southern part of the city of Indianapolis, Indiana. According to the Indiana Department Of Education, the Perry Township School Corporation educates over 14,000 K-12 students
  3. 3. with two high schools, two middle schools, two 6th grade academies, and 11 elementary schools. Indianapolis, Indiana has a population of approximately 820,000 citizens. The city has many things to offer and it includes: The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis; the Indianapolis Zoo; Indianapolis Motor Speedway; White River State Park; Lucas Oil Stadium; Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument; Victory Field; the NCAA Hall of Champions; Indianapolis International Airport; High-end Restaurants; Indiana World War Memorial Park; Indiana Central Canal; Bankers Life Fieldhouse; and many more tourist and residential attractions. Indianapolis boasts itself as the 13th largest city in the United States. Other School districts in the city of Indianapolis include Indianapolis Public Schools, MSD Lawrence Township, MSD Pike Township, MSD Decatur Township and MSD Wayne Township. During the 2012-2013 school year, Perry Meridian Middle School’s enrollment was at approximately 1,056 students. Included in that enrollment are special education students, general ability students, high ability and English language learner students. PMMS has a library, media center, fully equipped lunchroom and kitchen, a clinic, a front office, a multipurpose room and two gymnasiums. The composition of the student population shows some variation in ethnicity. 738 students, or approximately 69.9%, are Caucasian. The second largest ethnicity is Hispanic, followed by Asian, African American, Multiracial,
  4. 4. and finally American Indian. Single and two parent homes are present in the student population. The Free and Reduced Priced Meals are a reflection of the socioeconomic levels of the students as well. 488 students qualify for free meals, 82 receive reduced price meals, and the other 486 pay full price. This indicates that although the school is slightly racially homogeneous, the financial makeup of the students and their families varies greatly. The staff of Perry Meridian Middle School includes one principle, one assistant principle, an athletic director, two discipline advisors, multiple guidance counselors, 56 general and special education teachers, a media specialist, a resource officer, two librarians, three secretaries, instructional assistants, interventionist assistants, custodians and cafeteria assistants. The staff at PMMS is certified in CPR, AED, and Bloodborne Pathogens. The PMMS learning community is one that is determined to give each and every student the best educational experience possible. The staff, administration, and aids that work there bring their best everyday, and the student body rises to the high expectations set for them. It is an enjoyable place to be employed, and to learn from.
  5. 5. Classes Taught During the spring 2014 semester, my student teaching assignment was at Perry Meridian Middle School working with grade 8 Advanced Language Arts students. I taught a total of four advanced classes, one advisory classroom and aided my cooperating teaching in two IDEA classes. The average class size was 25 students. Students came from a variety of backgrounds and experiences. Reading and analyzing literary and non-fiction texts and writing were large focal points in all four Advanced Language Arts classes. The students in Advanced Language Arts are highly-capable learners. This means they intrinsically have the capacity to perform the level of work necessary for the advanced curriculum. However, the skill set varied widely in their ability to read and analyze literary and non-fiction texts, ranging from average to above average. Between all four classes, students universally struggled in some degree with main idea identification, vocabulary comprehension, and writing. My duties included teaching four periods of Advanced Language Arts, one advisory classroom, and aiding my cooperating teacher in two IDEA classes. Along with instructional duties, I also participated in weekly professional development “clusters”, hall monitoring and bus duty. Grading assignments and assessments, attendance, and creating lesson plans were also apart of my responsibilities as the classroom teacher.
  6. 6. IV. Philosophy of Education and Discipline My desire to become an educator does not end with achieving the title; in fact it just begins there. I aspire to be a facilitator of conversation, a confidant to students, a cultivator of literate minds, and subsequently the director to future literary discovery. I seek to demand the best out of all students, and will provide the step to which they will place their foot upon; therefore creating the foundation for future educational success. The classroom provides me the opportunity to arm every student with the tools to understand themselves as both learners, and empowered human beings. Education is a continuum that begins and ends with the students, and I must strive to diversify my approaches in order to best benefit their gain as the learner. I will create an environment that will boost the confidence amongst my students, but also create the stability for which great learning comes from. Lastly I will always treat my students and coworkers with the same professionalism that I would expect given to me. I am not only teaching my students a content area, but also how to conduct themselves in a way that is applicable to their real life. To do all of these things above I must be an effective teacher. Becoming a classroom teacher takes more than passion; it takes dedication to perfect the craft of teaching. An effective educator utilizes the best practices and strategies to create the best instruction; instruction based on the interest and the needs of students. Also an effective educator does not
  7. 7. just create, but also provides the students with the tools to build the learning environment they want to participate in. An environment where every student has the resources and opportunities they need. An effective educator incorporates many modes of formal and informal assessments. These two types of assessments provide the effective educator with the authentic data to accommodate future lessons. Reading – literary and informational – texts, writing, speaking and listening, and language are equally emphasized in the Language Arts curriculum. The effective educator uses state and national standards to be the format for which instruction is based. Standards-based education allows the teacher to create an on-going learning cycle. This cycle ensures that all students learn and master the grade-appropriate academic standards. An effective educator frames the focus of instruction toward leading students to engage in their learning and mastering grade-level expectations.
  8. 8. Philosophy of Discipline Discipline and classroom management exist as an additional learning experience for students. Good discipline should come from a desire to teach students to self-assess and self-regulate their own learning and behavior. A student who is well-disciplined in nature understands what is socially and personally acceptable within their social community. Good discipline should also be based upon mutual respect for the learning environment of those around them. Students should feel responsible for creating and maintaining a classroom environment conducive to learning. The well-disciplined student understands that disruptions during learning is unfair and unproductive to the classroom’s communal objectives. Effective classroom management helps ensure student success in regulating their behavior by eliminating many unnecessary problems within the classroom. I find that for my philosophy of discipline and management to be realized in the classroom, rules and guidelines must be made in collaboration with the students for whom will be most affected. From an adolescent standpoint, the secondary levels are a time of great personal discovery, as well as dramatic physical and cognitive changes. Naturally curious and rebellious, discipline and classroom management strategies for a secondary classroom are best served with a helping of understanding to support their presence. If students are able to realize why a certain action or reaction, within the classroom, is inappropriate they are more likely to self-regulate
  9. 9. their behavior. If rules and guidelines are made in collaboration, students are also more like to take ownership of themselves. When a student misbehaves in the classroom, the reaction of the teacher should match the behavior. Small problems, such as disruptive side conversations or off-task behavior, can be dissolved by closing the proximity between the teacher and student. More severe, or especially out-of- character behavior, should be handled with care and consideration to student and incident. It can be tempting to be placed in a situation where a student misbehaves, verbally reprimand the student and move on. This method of discipline lacks purpose and in fact does not fix the undesired behavior. In fact, it tends to postpone the said behaviors’ inevitable return in the future. If something severe enough occurs, the teacher should have a private conversation with the student. In this conversation the teacher should express interest in why the student behaved, and together the student and teacher should come up with other possible reactions. Ultimately rules and guidelines are for safety, ensuring all students have a positive environment in which to learn from. Yelling, screaming, force, and unnecessary tension do not need to occur for students to behave. Students who are engaged in what they are learning are less likely to engage in disruptive behavior. For those students who do misbehave, there is a model for which teachers should approach discipline.
  10. 10. V. Weekly Goals and Reflections January 13- 17, 2014 #3 Understand how my students differ in their approaches to learning. #9 Establish a professional relationship with my colleagues at PMMS. #10 Begin to foster a relationship with my students and their parents. January 20-24, 2014 #6 Focus on activating prior knowledge in students by relating their previous experiences to ones within a pre-reading text. #9 Observe outside of my cooperating classroom and reflect on the educational strategies and methods being utilized by the cooperating teacher. #8 Incorporate some different formal/informal assessment strategies beginning this week. January 27-31, 2014 #6 Continue to utilize the assessment date collected from last weeks’ home learning assignments. Use when differentiating future lesson plans. #4 Diversify my approach to student learning this week in a variety of activities. #7 Create purposeful learning activities based on the MOST attributes that students must address this week. Take into consideration factors outside of my control, such as weather conditions and environmental factors, when planning this weeks’ instruction. February 3-7, 2014 #5A Manage my transitions with more command and purpose. #5B Call on volunteers and non-volunteers this week during classroom discussions. #8 Work in some different forms of informal/formal assessments. February 10-14, 2014 #2 “Chunk” material in the pre-reading stage and better frontload complex texts. #4 Use better modeling technique when introducing, reviewing and instructing. #8 Use a rubric as a formal assessment model. February 17-21, 2014 #5A Learn to pace each day’s lessons correctly to maximize instruction time. #4 Allow students to apply their knowledge on a modeled reading comprehension strategy from last week -- “Story Notes”. #5A Utilize better transition techniques.
  11. 11. February 24-28, 2014 #3 Select resources to meet a range of individual needs. #5A Gauge as to when to cut one activity off and to begin another by improving my pacing. #7 Integrate purposeful learning activities into short and long-term instructional plans March 3-7, 2014#5A Preform all non-instructional duties with vigor and enthusiasm. #9 Be highly-reflective on the professional feedback I have been given. #7 Observe the administration of the ISTEP test. March 10-14, 2014 #9 Continue to be reflective on critiques and feedback I receive during the remainder of my placement. This only stands to make me a better teacher, inside and outside of the classroom. #7 Think critically about the activities used for the end of the novel unit. #9 Dedicate time and effort over the intermission break to completing my Portfolio and LAMP requirements. March 17-21; March 31-April 4, 2014 (Intersession Break) #9 Professional Growth (includes student teaching requirements and portfolio). Complete my LAMP Project, complete my suicide prevention training and pass the PEARSON Pedagogy test. #3 Review materials, strategies, and activities to bring back to the classroom after Intersession Break. April 7-11, 2014 #1 Demonstrate my knowledge of content during this week’s grammar review #4 Clearly explain the reflective writing exercise #5B Review appropriate behaviors for the IMC April 21-25 #9 Complete my final Video Analysis #9 Finish my student teaching showcase portfolio #9 Reflect on these last 16 weeks
  12. 12. VI. Observations Date - February 12, 2014 Mrs. Dever, 7th grade, IDEA Language Arts INTASC Standards serving the purpose of the observation: #2 The student teacher understands how students differ in their approaches to learning and creates instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners. #5 The student teacher uses an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction in the classroom. On Wednesday, February 12, 2014, I was able to sneak away from my advanced 8th graders to observe some advanced 7th graders. Mrs. Dever, the Advanced and IDEA teacher, allowed me to sit in with her 7th grade IDEA class. One of the immediate challenges coming into my student teaching placement was learning how to curve instruction to advanced learners. Too easy and they’ll pass without much effort. Too hard and I take the risk of turning them off from something they are naturally talented at. Therefore Mrs. McDougal thought it best to gain some exposure with advanced students at a different point in their education. Mrs. Dever was very receptive to having me come into her classroom and I was interested to see how this small peppy woman could command a classroom of 25+ rowdy adolescents. I also went into this observation with two things in mind: how does she use purposeful classroom management strategies to create the most productive learning environment and what sort of differentiation does she use to make the curriculum most useful to her students. As I walked in I observed the classroom’s SmartBoard and saw the agenda for the class period. First, students would work on their SAT word vocabulary sheet. Second, Mrs. Dever was going to talk to the students about their participation in an on-going journaling project. Lastly, students would be provided work time for their “Article of the Week”. For these reasons, I chose to observe how Mrs. Dever demonstrates INTASC principles #2 and #5, which explains how she differentiates approaches to learning and understands both individual and group motivations towards learning. Middle school has become a setting that I can see myself teaching in for a long while. Therefore it is my responsibility to know all that I can in order to be the best teacher to my students. Observing Mrs. Dever seemed like a good fit, and a smart choice. She has the natural ability to draw anyone into a conversation, student or
  13. 13. adult. What I first observed was how easily she took command of the room. I have learned the hard way is that it is no small thing to be able to do that. It takes a mixture of time, skill and purposeful thinking. Once the bell ceased, Mrs. Dever called the student’s attention. The small numbers of students still chattering were gathered by a simple nod from Mrs. Dever and they were off. Per the agenda, students pulled out their vocabulary sheets and began copying the SAT words to their running list. I was immediately impressed that students knew exactly what to do as soon as she said, “Go”. Mrs. Dever allowed a small amount of chatter to continue throughout the SmartStart, but never above a low roar. As the students copied, Mrs. Dever walked around to each cluster and talked to, what seemed like, a select group of students. This type of purposeful circulation is something I can take with me. This also demonstrates Mrs. Dever’s use of directions and procedures. Students knew exactly what to do and how to do it. The physical layout of Mrs. Dever’s classroom also speaks to her purposeful use of classroom management. Speaking in terms of classroom size, hers is relatively small. However, Mrs. Dever makes up for it in the way she lays out the 25+ desks into horseshoe clusters. These clusters, all numbered above off the ceiling tiles, are arranged in horseshoes of 8. This allows for Mrs. Dever to walk into any cluster and be faced to face with any student. It also keeps any student from ever having their back to the SmartBoard. I thought this was both clever, and a great use of space. I planned to take this with me into the future. Where I saw differentiation of curriculum was in the second part of the class period. From what I could tell, this was a catch-up day. Students had the option of completing their “Article of the Week” or choose to do corrections on an earlier assignment Mrs. Dever passed out earlier in the week. This struck me as a great way to allow students to work at their own pace, and use their own critical thinking to correct work. Also, 7th grade students are fitted with personal 1:1 laptop devices. Mrs. Dever allowed them to work independently to find the resources they needed to complete their assignments. This demonstrated her setting gifted-level expectations out of her students, and allowing them to achieve this through independent study. Many of the students however still needed direction on how to reword or correct their existing answers. The skill of revision can be very difficult for students. And even though these students are naturally gifted, this skill is complex and requires a large amount of critical thinking. As I continued to observe Mrs. Dever, I noticed that she spent time in each cluster to check the progress of each student. This demonstrated to me Mrs. Dever’s ability to provide individualized instructional opportunities.
  14. 14. This independent study also reaffirmed something I had previously noticed in my 8th grade classes. Advanced and gifted learners are actually excellent teachers. During work time, if Mrs. Dever was already occupied or otherwise unavailable, I observed several students able to turn to their neighbor and ask for help. In return, the neighbor was usually able to explain the question or concept in a way that was helpful. This demonstrated to me a classroom that was conducive to all types of learning. Date - February 17, 2014 Ms. Peyton, 7th and 8th grade, English Language Learners INTASC Standards serving the purpose of the observation: #3 The student teacher understands how students differ in their approaches to learning and creates instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners #5 The student teacher uses an understanding of individual and group motivations and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction in the classroom. On Monday, February 17, 2014, I was given the opportunity to take a break from advanced learners in order to see how the other half live. Ms. Peyton allowed me to observed ½ of her 90-minute block of English Language Learners. This particular group of students featured ELL students on the lower end of the English Language spectrum. Ms. Peyton however is not just an ELL teacher; in fact the rest of her day is spent teaching general 7th and 8th Language Arts learners. I was immediately greeted by a wave of smiles and questions from these students, “Who are you?” “Where are you from?” And my personal favorite, “Are you our new teacher?” Unlike my own students who are used to my presence in the classroom, it takes other students a few moments to adjust to me being in their space. Ms. Peyton seemed to allow their curiosity to flourish until the second bell rang, and class was signaled to begin. At the front of the room, the SmartBoard was pulled up to their Smart Start. On this day, students were exploring the use of Idioms in the English Language Vocabulary. It is not surprising that students on the lowest end of the English Language spectrum would struggle with idioms, and their place within out language. Ms. Peyton began class with directions to pull out their Writing Journals and begin
  15. 15. to decode the idiom within this sentence, “My car cost an arm and a leg”. The directions on the board told students to a) Determine what the idiom “an arm and a leg” meant and b) What it meant within the sentence. Several students, still riled up from my presence in the back of the room, found it hard to focus. It seemed to that it was a combination of factors, but regardless Ms. Peyton did not allow the behavior to go for long. She sent one student to the hallway to calm down, and with directions to not return until she came out to get him. This demonstrated to me her ability to respond immediately to student misbehavior. Even when students were instructed to work independently, I observed several who continued to talk during and after instructions. Ms. Peyton came back to speak with me and when she did she was able to clarify the “constant stream of translation”. Ms. Peyton explained that a handful of students in the classroom know a very limited amount of English, and those other more advanced students in the classroom work as translators. During large group discussions, there is always a low roar of students translating back and forth. Stations were next up for the day’s agenda. There were three stations set up throughout the room for students to participate in. One station used a 1:1 vocabulary based activity to work on vocabulary comprehension. The second station was a place for students to sit and read the Article of the Week. The last station was a ”popcorn” read aloud of Number the Stars led by Ms. Peyton. Through the first cycle, I sat and listened as Ms. Peyton and the students read through Number the Stars. Ms. Peyton led the reading by modeling fluency for the students. She then passed the reading to the left. One by one, each student read a page or so of the novel. Most started off quietly, apprehensive to make a mistake in front of Ms. Peyton or their classmates. However, by the end of their turn, each student seemed to gain more and more confidence in their abilities. I was able to witness Ms. Peyton’s ability to create instructional and learning opportunities for diverse learners. Ms. Peyton’s choice of book was age and level appropriate to her student’s needs. Also, even when reading along with her station, she was still able to maintain the behavior of every single student in the room. With early intervention, she stopped any small disruption.
  16. 16. VII. Videotape Analysis Date – April 14, 2014 On Monday, April 14, 2014, I taped myself during first period. Monday’s overall goal was to continue to practice grammar, punctuation and convention skills, introduce the poetry portfolio, reflect on poetry, and visit the IMC (library). The INTASC principles I planned to demonstrate in this video were principles 1, 4, and 5B. More specifically, I planned to demonstrate my knowledge of content, a variety of instructional strategies, and establishment of behavior expectations. My first goal was to review and model the location and explanation of a pronoun/antecedent relationship. My second goal was to clearly explain the reflective writing exercise, and to establish appropriate behavior expectations for the IMC. A secondary goal to this lesson was to also monitor student behavior through the use of formal and informal modifications. In this short video clip, I began instruction with the daily Smart Start. Over the last four weeks, the entire Perry Meridian Middle School has been explicitly preparing students for the second round of ISTEP. This day’s Smart Start focused on the identification and relationship between pronouns and antecedents. Per the procedure established by my cooperating teacher, I too begin the day’s instruction at the front of the room. However at the beginning of the video, I am out of view having a quick conversation with a student who was absent the previous day. Students can be seen sitting in their clusters and talking quietly. The lesson begins with an informal introduction, “Okay guys so before we do our Smart Start we are going to talk about antecedents. Does anyone know what an antecedent is, without looking on the white board”? I then called on a volunteer who raised their hand. The volunteer did read the definition on the white board, which I half expected given my choice of introduction. Next, I review the definition of an antecedent and the example written on the adjacent whiteboard. My next sets of instructions were to read through the pronoun/antecedent handout and determine the two’s relationship. I gave students a very small window of review, and allowed them to work independently. During the independent work time, I can be seen on and off-camera checking student work for accuracy. After the four minutes were up, I gathered student attention by going back to the front of the room. I modeled reading the first sentence aloud and gave students their three answer choices: antecedent, no antecedent or not clear. First, when I looked up, off-camera a student raised her hand and shook her head “no”. I chose to build off her recognition by calling on her. Second, I tried to encourage all learners to volunteer answers; whether they were unsure or not. Also, I used affirmative phrases such as “Perfect”, “YES!” “Good” and personal affirmations. Third, I modeled the thinking necessary to identify antecedents by referencing them within the sentence. For example, “The audience clapped its
  17. 17. hands. Who’s the its? The audience.” At the end of the exercise, I transition to the next activity. Students put their Smart Start away and pulled out their poetry from Friday. Students are instructed to take out their poetry and a writing utensil. As students are transiting, I walk around the classroom and assess how many students have their poems. Then as I go on to explain the assignment, I acknowledge those students who failed to bring in their poetry. I read the two reflective questions aloud and expand on what exactly I am asking students to do. I give them their two reflective questions, and a time limit. You can see me walking around, on and off-camera, monitoring student behavior and participation in the activity. In the video, you see one young student pass a pencil to another student. As I am off-camera, I notice this misbehavior. I then relocate myself for a moment to speak with the student quickly, and then place myself again at the front of the room. Then I take myself next to the second offending student. The video cuts out shortly before I collected the poetry and assigned the home learning assignment. The degree to which I accomplished my goals was varied. First, I do believe I was able to explain the pronoun and antecedent relationship. Therefore demonstrating my competency of INTASC principle number one and my knowledge of content. However, what I believe I can improve on is my fluency of instruction. I witnessed possibly my world habit, “um”, “so” and “guys”. I wonder if I was nervous to the camera, or unprepared for student ability level. This was the first time they students and I had actually practiced pronoun/antecedent relationships, although I was assured they had practiced them before. Nonetheless I do thing that I accomplished my goal of demonstrating my knowledge of a content objective. The degree to which I accomplished the second and third goals was not fully captured on film. My recording device stopped a few minutes shy of the IMC instruction. However, the focal point of INTASC principle 4 is the use of a variety of instructional strategies. I was able to demonstrate a variety of instructional strategies such questioning strategies, modeling, use of technology, instructional handouts and visuals. The questioning strategy I used was the calling on volunteer and non-volunteers. I can improve on my use of this strategy by calling on a wider variety of students. The second instructional strategy, modeling the answer, can be seen throughout the short video clip. After calling on student volunteers and non-volunteers, I modeled the technique for identifying the antecedent’s relationship to a pronoun. The example I used earlier was, “The audience clapped its hands. Who’s the its? The audience.” This demonstrates my ability as an educator to model the metacoginitive processes needed to answer this question. Lastly, had it been included in the video, I would have shown my ability to design behavior expectations for the IMC. However, the video does preview my
  18. 18. ability to demonstrate transition expectations. In transition from the Smart Start to the poetry reflections, students knew exactly what was expected, “What I want you to get out right now is your poem from this weekend … All you need on your desk, right now, is your poem and a writing utensil.” These purposeful and specific directions gave students expectations, in preparation for the next activity. An example of personal idiosyncrasy includes holding tangible products of work or instructional aids. In my video, and upon further reflection, I notice that instructional aids can often been found in my hands. These aids can either hinder or enhance instruction time. In this particular video clip, the instructional aid hindered the fluency of my speech. I notice that I often check back for accuracy in my answers and to provide feedback. Another idiosyncrasy of mine is the use of my hands during expression. I use my hands to express emotion and importance. My voice is another idiosyncrasy. During the early morning classes especially, I tend to influx my voice to the progression of the activity. If I could do anything differently to set the mood or climate for learning I would establish a more authoritative attitude from the beginning. The introduction to the Smart Start would have gone along smoother with a more established script. If I would have had more time to prepare, I believe I could have narrated a more instructionally sound introduction. My questions were pre-determined with the instructional handout. However, I believe I was able to rephrase questions to alleviate confusion for students. One weakness I observed during my video analysis is my use of non- essential “uhms”, “guys”, and “okay”. An effective teacher does not need to use vocabulary fillers in their instruction. The use of the vocabulary filler “guys” is something that I have struggled with. These non-essential vocabulary fillers impede the clarity of my instruction and distract from my professional presence. In the future, I hope to be more conscious of vocabulary fillers, and be even more conscious on correctly this speech pattern. A strength I observed during my video analysis is my ability to transition between multiple learning activities. Today’s instruction had three major components: grammar and conventions practice, poetry reflection, and an IMC assignment. On IMC days, time in the classroom is cut short. Therefore instruction time in the classroom is precious. Effective transitions, and quick but purposeful pacing, allowed students to get through their entire daily agenda. Going forward I hope to use this observation as a reflective learning experience. The take away message is to continue to steer away from vocabulary fillers, and demonstrate more of a command during instruction time. Maintaining pace was an advantage, while I still struggle with calling on a wider variety of students during question/answer time. Overall, this was a learning experience that I can take with me into the future.
  19. 19. Date – April 15, 2014 On Tuesday, April 15, 2014, I taped myself again during first period. Tuesday’s overall goal was to continue with this idea of identify within poetry and reflect on its relevance to our lives. The INTASC principles I planned to demonstrate in this video were principles 1, 3, and 5A. More specifically, I planned to demonstrate my knowledge of content, my understanding of expectations for learning and achievement, and my management of pacing and transitions. My first goal was to demonstrate my ability to lead students in selecting the best grammatical option for a sentence. My second goal was to clearly state my expectations for learning and participation in the day’s activities, and lastly maintain a steady pace and rhythm during transitions. A secondary goal was to improve upon the things I wrote about in my previous observation. In this short video clip, I began instruction with the daily Smart Start. Like the previous day’s Smart Start, the last four weeks have been in preparation for the second round of ISTEP testing. The coordinated effort by Perry Meridian Middle School has been to explicitly prepare students for both the grammar and multiple- choice assessment model found on the test. Today’s Smart Start focused on identifying the best correction to five grammatically incorrect sentences. Per the procedure established by my cooperating teacher, I too begin the day’s instruction at the front of the room. Today I am in view of the camera and begin the day’s instruction by corralling student attention immediately after the bell rings. I tell students that today’s Smart Start is connected with the previous days and review the steps for completing it. After students are done, they are given the expectation to read their IMC book. After several minutes, and three passes around the room, I notice that most people are finished with their Smart Start and reading their IMC books. I do the “class clap” in order to gain student attention. But first, I mention in a soft voice, “Okay take one more minute to finish up the page of your book and get ready to review your answers to the Smart Start.” After that moment had passed, I do the clap and we begin reviewing the material. Students struggle with one question in particular, but I am able to clear up confusion with little problem. After the Smart Start, we transition towards the discussion of the poem “Identity”. We only spend a few moments reading the poem aloud and analyzing the two questions at the bottom of the handout. I then collect the poem by using a transition technique I have picked up from my cooperating teacher. I stand in the corner of a room and say, “Okay, the person with the longest hair please bring me your entire cluster’s handouts from last night.” Once all of the poems are collected we move towards the “The Little Boy” poem.
  20. 20. With this poem, I front load with the same questions we have been using for all of the poems we have previously looked at, “What do you know about this poem?” “Does anything stand out about it?” Students volunteer a variety of answers, but I focus on the person who says it is “long like a story”. I piggyback off this comment and tell students it is in fact a narrative poem because it tells a story about the character. I then read the poem aloud and as a series of four pre-determined questions by Mrs. M. The students and I move quickly towards the final activity, however my video shuts off. The degree to which I accomplish my goals are varied. First, I do believe I was able to explain the relationship between the correct multiple-choice answer and its reason why. However, I still struggled today with the effectiveness of my communication. Those vocabulary-fillers still interrupted my speech every once in a while. I believe that I may be sensitive to this behavior because my previous observation was only last week, but it is something I will continue to watch out for. The degree to which I accomplished by second and third goal was more positive. I believe I clearly maintained expectations for student learning and achievement through the use of the guided Smart Start and clear instructions for what students were to do when they finished. My last goal was my biggest success by far. Despite a packed agenda, I was able to maintain a steady pace and the class was able to complete all of the planned activities. An example of personal idiosyncrasy in this video analysis includes relying on the wall clock to often to check my time. Effective pacing comes with an awareness of how long each activity needs to last before moving on to the next thing. I noticed myself several times breaking eye contact with students to look up at the clock behind me. This not only broke my concentration, but distracted from the learning environment. Granted it was first period and I was not the one planning instruction, but a better strategy for keeping track of time may be in order to curve this tendency. If I could do anything different to the mood and climate for learning I would maintain a better sense of order between the time students enter the room and the tardy bell rings. The video in the back of the room caught some students off guard, and I was able to witness some of the little things they do when a teacher is not looking. Things such as poke another student walking by or taking their books off the desks can lead to a bad start to the instructional period. Going forward I would like to continue to record and track my progress on all of the INTASC principles. By recording and critiquing my performance in the classroom I am performing my own evaluation of my professional development.
  21. 21. INTASC One: Understands Content The student teacher understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) he or she teachers and can create learning experiences that make these aspects of subject matter meaningful to students.
  22. 22. INTASC Principle One Artifact #1: LAMP Resources List During my LAMP unit, I made a list of resources that were used in the classroom to help students better understand the content. All of the handouts that I made were ones that I created, or were made in reference to handouts created and cited on this resource list. I used books, Web sites, images and blogs to help students better understand the content. By creating a list filled with educational and interest-based texts and resources, I learned a lot about what it means to build an entire unit. The resources labeled for the teacher were all textbooks, websites, and blogs dedicated to perfecting writing and vocabulary instruction. These resources not only helped build this unit, but I can use these resources when crafting future units. The resources labeled for students were short stories, articles and even a movie trailer used to build student understanding of upcoming content. I learned that students needs a variety of opportunities to apply their understanding, and to activate their prior knowledge. This artifact demonstrates my competence on the INTASC Principle because it demonstrates my ability to seek out resources and materials that make for a meaningful learning experience. The “Teacher Resources” offered me the tools of inquiry to create the lesson plans, handouts and activities used within the classroom. I was able to take these tools of inquiry and apply them to the student resources. During my LAMP unit, students were going to read an article about the
  23. 23. site of a massive volcanic eruption and be asked to answer a series of short answer questions about the article. As a pre-reading activity, my students and I could have jumped right into a discussion about volcanoes and easily completed the “K” of a “KWL” chart based on that information. Instead we watched a movie trailer from the soon-to-be released movie “Pompeii” and used that to spark our discussion about volcanoes and how much they know about the city of Pompeii. The movie trailer peaked the interest of my students, activated their prior knowledge and sparked a lively conversation about volcanoes. By understanding the content of the article, I was able to reach out to alternate resources to introduce the topic.
  24. 24. Teacher Resources 501 Writing Prompts. 1st. New York: Learning Express, Web. 2 Apr. 2014. Burke, Jim. Tools for Thought: Graphic Organizers for Your Classroom. Heinmann Education Books, 2002. Print. “Circles of Knowledge.” Smeckens Education Solutions, INC. 2014: n. page. Web. 2 April 2014. Puckett, D. A to Z Literacy Strategies: 70 Best Practice Strategies for Teaching Reading and Writing Across Middle Grades Content Areas. 2008. Web. 2 Apr. 2014. Writing Prompts. Tumblr, 12 2 2014. Web. 2 Apr. 2014. Student Resources Bastille. Pompeii. Bad Blood. Virgin Records, 2013. Forsyth, Pamela. “From Pompeii to Yellowstone, There’s a Volcano in Everybody’s Future.”. Newsworks. Feb 3 2014: n. page. Web. 2 Apr. 2014. Obama, Barack. Dreams From My Father. 2nd. New York: Three Rivers Press, 2004. Print. Robb, Alice. "Why Are We Afraid Of Spiders? There Are Two Competing Theories." New Republic. Jan 14 2014: n. page. Web. 2 Apr. 2014. Skelton, Renee. "Over The Top." National Geographic, 2008. Print. Sony Pictures. “Pompeii – Official Trailer – Coming February 2014.” Online video clip. Youtube, 4 Dec 2013. Web. 2 April 2014. Trivedi, Bijal. "The Spider Man Behind Spider-Man." National Geographic Online. 2 May 2002: n. page. Web. 2 Apr. 2014.
  25. 25. INTASC Principle One Artifact #2: “The Monkey’s Paw” Research One of the first lessons I solo-taught was over “The Monkey’s Paw” by W.W. Jacobs. It is a short story written in 1902, and was recommended by the cooperating teacher as a “big hit” with the students. I had never previously read or analyzed the story and so over the weekend I conducted research in preparation for instruction. The piece was written over 100 years ago, and so I knew there would be language and content that would be foreign to students. I read the piece several times, and each time identified vocabulary words and phrases that I knew would be confusing for students. These words and phrases are circled in pink. Other notes and references I found are made in black. I also did research on the author, W.W. Jacobs, and looked for any biographical significance that would compliment my student’s understanding of the short story. Lastly, as an after-reading activity students were going to complete a handout to identify the most important events from within the text. I completed this handout before leading instruction. Conducting research on any text I plan to introduce and teach in class has to be thorough and done well in advance. With the recommendation from my cooperating teacher, I felt confident that this piece was safe for students to read. However, in the future I must be the utmost authority on any piece I teach. Therefore thorough research must be conducted to ensure that all aspects of the piece are appropriate for students. Also, I must be well-versed on a piece before I
  26. 26. introduce it to students in order to catch points of confusion, vocabulary outside of student’s lexile levels and to create purposeful questions for discussion. The artifact demonstrates my competence on the INTASC principle by demonstrating my willingness to put in time outside of the classroom to build instruction. The evidence features my handwritten notes on the teacher’s copy of the text and the after-reading handout students were going to complete in class. These elements demonstrate my ability and willingness to put in the time necessary before instruction. I knew the content of the story, established pre- determined stopping points to clear up confusion, and completed the supplemental handout beforehand.
  27. 27. INTASC Two: Understanding Development The student teacher understands how children learn and develop and can provide learning opportunities that support their intellectual, social, and personal development.
  28. 28. INTASC Principle Two Artifact #1: Get to Know You Survey On my first day of student teaching I presented my students with a Prezi all about my life. In this Prezi I showed aspects of myself that were meaningful to me, such as my family, my favorite book, my friends etc. Then I turned the tables on my students and asked them to share five things about their lives. On a half-slip of paper, students wrote down 5 things based on a list of questions at the end of my Prezi. I asked students to tell me 1) what they did last Saturday night, 2) one thing they did over Winter Break, 3) if they could listen to only one artist for the rest of their life who would it be, 4) their favorite book, and 5) one thing they cannot live without. These five things represented aspects of my student’s lives that could be important when planning opportunities to build their whole development as learners. Using a diagnostic survey to begin my placement told me a lot about my students. The survey showed me some individual character and learning traits. I learned about their interests outside of the classroom, such as their afterschool activities. I learned about their musical and artistic tastes. The surveys gave me a gauge as to which genres of books interest them, and which students had avoidance to reading all together. I learned about their extrinsic motivations, such as using technology and socializing. Also, I noticed distinct differences in reading preferences between boys and girls, and even individual classes. Some surveys were more telling than others,
  29. 29. but overall this diagnostic tool gave me an abundance of information to pull from when designing learning opportunities. This artifact demonstrates my competence on the INTASC principle because it shows my ability to document student intellectual, social and personal development as learners, and use it to shape future instruction. This survey worked two-fold - as an icebreaker activity and as a personality diagnostic tool. Working as a diagnostic tool, this survey showed me aspects of each student’s individual personality and preferences. It also helped build a basis of communication and familiarity between my students and I. Lastly, it demonstrates my ability to use information to shape future instruction and discussion topics. With this information I was able to tap into their interest and reference situations and texts they were already familiar with.
  30. 30. INTASC Principle Two: Artifact #2: Dreams From My Father Prior Knowledge Activity In order to prepare students for an upcoming reading assignment, I created a pre-reading PowerPoint discussion activity about President Barack Obama. For their home learning assignment, students were going to read an excerpt from the President’s memoir Dreams From My Father. The PowerPoint featured a picture of President Obama as a young boy growing up in Hawaii and students were instructed to look at the image and try to guess whom the little boy was. After identifying the young boy, I activated their prior knowledge of President Obama before he was elected to the White House through the use of images and facts. Through this activity, I learned the value of building contexts before releasing students to independently tackle a text. In each class, only three or four students were able to raise their hands and correctly identify the little boy in the PowerPoint. Even fewer were willing or able to elaborate on aspects of President Obama’s life before moving into the White House. By using a PowerPoint to visually show examples of President Obama before he took office and to recall things they have heard in the media, I activated their prior knowledge and laid a foundation for their reading. This artifact demonstrates my competence on the INTASC principle by demonstrating that I am always thinking about what challenges a text may present to my students, and tackling it with pre-reading activities. Students develop at a variety of different rates depending on their age and grade
  31. 31. level. By identifying the reference gap between my students and an upcoming text, I was able to create an activity to bridge that gap and build off of things they already knew. It demonstrates that I can pull from even the smallest element of prior knowledge and create activities based on their needs.
  32. 32. Class/Grade: McDougal – 8th Date to be Taught: February 11, 2014 Student Name: Vicki Judge Subject/Topic: Language Arts/ Vocabulary Common Core Standards: • Social Studies: CCSS RH 8.7 – Integrate visual information (e.g. charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with other information in print or digital texts. • English Language Arts: CCSS RL 8.4 – Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze impact of specific words choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, and beautiful. • English Language Arts: CCSS W 8.10 – Write routinely over extended period time frames and short time frames for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences. Indiana Standards: • Social Studies: SS. 8.3.3 – Identify and locate the major climate regions in the United States and describe the characteristics of the region • English Language Arts: EL 8.1.3 – Verify the meaning of a word in its context, even if its meaning is not directly stated, through the use of definitions, restatement, examples, comparison, or contrast. • English Language Arts: EL 8.4.1 – Discusses ideas of writing, keep a list or notebook of ideas, and use graphic organizers to plan writing. Materials K.I.M Strategy Handout Writing Prompt Examples Dreams From My Father PowerPoint Dreams From My Father Excerpt Technology ELMO Projector Smart Board Photocopier Objective o Students will be able to define a word using context clues and memory cues. o Students will be able to categorize a writing prompt based on its cue words and intended purpose.
  33. 33. o Students will be able to activate prior knowledge in preparation for an upcoming text. Motivation/Engagement Students will create an appropriate titles based on an image featured within the excerpt of Dream From My Father, which they will be introduced to later in the lesson. Goal for Learner Today we are going to look at an example of literary non-fiction. Literary non-fiction is a distinct genre of writing in that it describes events as they actually happened, much like a dry biography, but uses tone and mood to set the narrative up more like a story. We are also going to look at a list of vocabulary works and create definitions and memory cues so that we can use these words in our own writing. Content and Procedure 1. Smart Start (8 minutes) a. Generate possible titles for an image 2. Writing Prompt Practice (6 minutes) a. Purpose: Persuasive, Expository, Narrative b. Decode i. Whole class  Individual  Group  Share 3. K.I.M (12 minutes) a. Preview K.I.M words b. Review K.I.M Procedure i. Keyword ii. Information iii. Memory Clue c. Complete K.I.M handout together on whiteboard 4. Introduce Dreams From My Father (12 minutes) a. Show image of young Barack i. Who can tell me who this young man is? ii. Have you see this picture before? If so where? b. President Barack Obama i. Raised primarily by his mother and maternal grandparents ii. Father is from Kenya; has several half-siblings all over the world 1. Parents divorced when he was very young iii. Born in Hawaii + lived in a variety of place (i.e. Philippines). iv. Studied at Harvard Law, became Junior Senator, elected President of the United States in 2008 v. Cover of the memoirs features pictures of his collective family
  34. 34. vi. Written before he was president; reflects on his heritage and how it focused his future. 5. Home learning: Read and annotate the excerpt; Make 20 annotations
  35. 35. INTASC Three: Understands Differences The student teacher understands how students differ in their approaches to learning and creates instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners.
  36. 36. INTASC Principle Three Artifact #1: Episodic Notes In the days leading up to this lesson, students read Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes and completed a Flowers for Algernon packet as a home learning assignment. The following school day, I collected their packets and checked for understanding by reviewing their answers. Then we focused our attention to the development of the main character, Charlie. Students received an envelope with a celebrity or pop icon inside. They then had to collaborate with their group and identify three points of character development within this person and/or character. This activity activated their prior knowledge and modeled the next activity they’d be completing. My evidence for this INTASC principle is the episodic note activity. Using the celebrity/pop icon activity to guide their focus, students worked in groups of three to identify three sequential elements of character development in Charlie. Each person had their own half-slip note with instructions to determine the three most important stages of character development, illustrate one of those moments into the provided box, and write a short analysis of which stage shown. By choosing to incorporate small group opportunities and elements of illustration and art, I reinforced the idea that students benefit when given a chance to show and discuss their learning. Although nervous that students would focus more on the social element of this activity rather than the task, I was impressed that when given the chance students could perform both. I
  37. 37. also learned that some students flourish when given the opportunity to produce elements of art in their learning. The time in class given to complete this activity was limited; this did not deter some students from getting right to work and completing their elements of illustration and art. This artifact demonstrates my ability to utilize a variety of learning and instructional strategies to benefit all learners. The first part of the lesson was a discussion led by me, and then students had a chance in the celebrity activity to interact and rely on their partner’s knowledge. This shift from whole to small group demonstrates my understanding of how students best apply their knowledge. Students were given several opportunities to create learning through an array of individual, small group and whole class discussions. It also demonstrates my ability to pull from a variety of resources to create a learning experience with real-life applicability. The celebrity character development activity showed students that a literary skill, such as character development, extends outside the pages of a book and applies to the celebrities they gossip about in the hallways. Lastly, I demonstrate that I understand the students need to practice and apply content skills in a variety of formats, such as episodic notes.
  38. 38. Class/Grade: McDougal – 8th Date to be Taught: January 29, 2014 Student Name: Vicki Judge Subject/Topic: Language Arts/Character Development Common Core Standards: • English Language Arts: CCSS RL 8.4 – Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze impact of specific words choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, and beautiful. Materials Flowers for Algernon text Flowers for Algernon packet Dry erase marker/ Whiteboard Celebrity envelops Episodic Notes Technology SmartBoard Photocopier Objective o Students will be able to analyze a literary text for elements of character development and main idea o Students will be able to identify points of character development o Students will be able to sequence main events Motivation/Engagement Students will participate in a small group activity with celebrity examples and connect literary elements to their daily lives. Goal for Learner Today we will review Flowers for Algernon and identify elements of character development within the main character, Charlie. But first,
  39. 39. we will identify character development in some of our favorite celebrities and well-known Disney characters. Content and Procedure 1. Smart Start (6 minutes) a. Multiple-choice practice 2. Collect Flowers for Algernon Packets a. Make sure students have their names on their packets! b. Collect annotated text as well 3. Review answers to questions on Flowers for Algernon Packets (10 minutes) 4. Character Development (5 minutes) a. The change in characterization of a dynamic character, who changes over the course of a narrative. b. Reference Katniss Everdeen  How does Katniss change over the course of “The Hunger Games”? c. Name three examples of her changing over the book i. Beginning: girl living in District 12; Smart, but has little power to change her surroundings and those of her friends/family; Loyal and firm in her convictions. ii. Middle: Volunteers for the Games; Sent to the Capital; questions the necessity of such much inequality between the Districts; Goes into the Games; sees Rue die iii. End: Defies the Capital to save Peeta and herself; knowingly/unknowingly becomes a symbol for the resistance. 5. Celebrity Activity (10 minutes) a. Pass out sealed envelope with a “surprise” celebrity example b. Students identify three elements of character development in their celebrity example i. Brainstorm a list; collaborate c. Recite their list to the class d. Class determine the three MOST important developments 6. Episodic Notes a. Explain the use of episodic notes b. Allow students to choose their own groups i. No more than 3 per group c. Review instructions: i. Students have the rest of class to determine three points of character development; sequence them chronologically; assign one to each group member; complete the episodic note 7. HL: Bring back completed episodic notes
  40. 40. Episodic Notes Purpose: Identify most important moments; show cause-effect and organization (Sequence) 1. Determine the three most crucial stages, scenes, or moments in the story. 2. Draw in the box what happens and what you “see” in the text. Be as specific as possible. 3. Remember: These are notes not works of art: Try to capture the action and important details of the moment. 4. Explain (in the notes section) what is happening and why it is important INTASC Principle 3 Artifact #2: Differentiated Curriculum Caption
  41. 41. Solely based on the nature of advanced learners, almost their entire curriculum is differentiated to meet their unique needs. However just like any general Language Arts classroom, there is a necessitate to accommodate students at their various level of readiness, interest and learning profiles. Characteristics of a differentiated curriculum include instruction that is focused on providing an opportunity for every student to explore their learning and to apply the key concepts of the subject being studied. My evidence for INTASC principle three is a final text-feature activity students completed with the aid of their shoulder partner. For several days, students had been working towards identifying text features within non-fiction articles. The final activity was more complex that the previous two activities. It required them to identify text features and make predictions based on their relevance to a newspaper article. This type of readiness-based differentiation to student learning demonstrates my ability to make accommodations based on student skill. What I learned is that differentiation can take on many forms, and that it is not a one-size-fit-all instructional strategy. Differentiation ranges from providing accommodations for students with physical and cognitive handicaps, to scaffolding student learning towards more and more complex texts and activities. I learned that differentiation is an instructional strategy that takes place over a period time. Data and observations of student learning must be collected before implementing purposeful plans for
  42. 42. accommodation. I also learned that my students innately require plans that have a capacity for their brightness. This artifact demonstrates my competence of the INTASC principle by showing my ability to increase the complexity of activities overtime. I am able to identify the point where students can be slowly released from my undivided instruction. It also demonstrates my ability to shape instruction and accommodate for shifting needs within the classroom. My artifact was originally not in my instruction plans, however I noticed that students could use an activity that creates an opportunity them to explore their own understanding.
  43. 43. Materials Images for Smart Start Text Features Part Two Handout Newspaper Articles Technology Smart Board ELMO Projector Photocopier Objective o Students will be able to analyze tools for reading nonfiction articles (i.e. text features). o Students will be able to identify text features and understand the importance real life applicable texts. o Students will be able to generate an appropriate title based on an image’s content. Motivation/Engagement Today is a day where we are going to apply all of the knowledge we have learned about text features and non-fiction texts. We are going to look at newspaper clippings and by only the text features you are going to begin to make predictions about the content of the article. You’ll be Student Name: Vicki Judge Subject/Topic: Language Arts/ Text Features Indiana Standards: • English Language Arts: EL.8.2.3 – Find similarities and differences between texts in the treatment, amount of coverage, or organization of ideas. • English Language Arts: EL.8.2.9 – Make reasonable statements and draw conclusions about a text, supporting them with accurate examples. Class/Grade: McDougal – 8th Date to be Taught: February 21, 2014 Common Core Standards: • English Language Arts: CCSS RI 8.1 – Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. • English Language Arts: CCSS RI 8.4 – Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze impact of specific words choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, and beautiful. • Speaking and Listening: CCSS SL 8.1 – Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher- led) with diverse partners on grade 8 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
  44. 44. able to test those predictions by reading the actual articles, and creating a summary. Today will also primarily be a partner-work day. I will take a step back and you can collaborate with your cluster mates. Before we begin we will do some review of pre-writing exercises and title generation. Let’s get started! Goal For Learner We last left off on Tuesday with the “The Spider Man Behind Spider-Man” and a graphic organizer to explore the usefulness of the text features. We are going to put your knowledge of the different kinds of text features and their uses to the test using newspaper clippings. Today we will make predictions, identify different text features, and read timely newspaper articles. Content and Procedures 1. Smart Start: Generate titles (8 minutes) a. Flash image on SmartBoard b. Brainstorm possible titles 2. Transition into the newspaper modeling activity a. Pass out “Identifying Text Features: Part Two” handouts 3. Model Newspaper Clipping activity (12 minutes) a. Cover up everything BUT the main heading i. Ask for student volunteer to read the title aloud ii. Make a prediction about the article based on the title b. Release the subheading and repeat c. Release the main picture i. Record these predictions along with students on their handout d. Read the short article aloud; evaluate predictions for accuracy aloud with students 4. Use the remaining class time to complete the backside of the handout a. With their shoulder partner students should: i. Record the title of the article ii. Identify the text features used iii. Generate a prediction BASED on the text features iv. Read and write a summary of the article v. Create a reflection; evaluating on the accuracy of their predictions 5. Turn in the handout at the bell Practice/Application • Model the steps to the text feature’s activity • Explain to students their role in today’s activities, and how also to be an effective partner-duo • Monitor their engagement and ability to apply their knowledge to the task Evaluation of Student Learning • Collaborate with student’s to determine appropriate titles  Informally
  45. 45. • Monitor student behavior during partner-work time  Informally • Collect their activity handout at the end of class  Formally Closure Hopefully, today’s activity showed you the applicability of text features to your everyday life. Text features are not only included in non-fiction articles to look nice and draw your attention to a story, but also to help a reader skim and pull out the story’s main idea. They are used so frequently in almost every media format: from Facebook to the Indianapolis Star. Next week we will look at two final non-fiction articles. Your task is to remember all that you have learned and apply it without me explicitly pointing them out.
  46. 46. Name(s) Date Period Identifying Text Features: Part Two Standards: CCSS RI 8.1, 8.2, W 8.4, 8.4,8.9, SL 8.1 Directions: • First, skim the text feature(s) of an article: Heading, subheadings, bullet points, sidebars, and/or pictures. • Secondly, predict what the article may be about based ONLY on the text features. • Then, READ the article. • Next, summarize the article into AT LEAST three sentences. • Finally, INDEPENDENTLY reflect and expand on one of these four questions: Were your predictions right? How do the text features used in the article help you know what the main idea is? Where in this text could the author add a chart, graph, table, and/or diagram? What text features does the author use most effectively? Title of the Article Text Feature(s) Used Prediction Based on Text Feature(s) Summary Reflection
  47. 47. INTASC Four: Designs Instructional Strategies The student teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage students’ development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills. INTASC Principle Four
  48. 48. Artifact #1: Evaluations from University Supervisor My evidence for INTASC principle four is an evaluation done on February 6, 2014. My University Supervisor, Becky Gentry, did this evaluation of a single teaching experience while visiting my classroom. On this day, students and I were wrapping up our reading of “The Monkey’s Paw” by W.W. Jacobs. My supervisor watched me lead the daily smart start, a small group and large group discussion about superstitions, and a vocabulary activity. What I learned through this experience is that evaluations are a chance to promote professional development. Teacher evaluations typically serve a developmental purpose by solidifying a teacher’s commitment to professional learning. My professional development came after reading the marks and comments left by university supervisor. What I lacked in skillful questioning techniques and invidual modifications, I made up for in my use of several instruction strategies, such as small and large group discussions, brainstorming and a vocabulary activity. This artifact demonstrates the INTASC principle by documenting my first evaluation as a success. My university supervisor gave me high marks for including “nice classroom involvement” in the brain storming activity and my “effective” and “respectful” manner for handing student comments and opinions. I also received high marks for relating information to an authentic and relatable topic for my students. Overall, this artifact demonstrates my
  49. 49. ability to incorporate and implement several best practices within instruction.
  50. 50. INTASC Five: Manages and Motivates The stud ent teacher uses an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction in the classroom.
  51. 51. INTASC Principle Five Artifact #1: Seating Chart Sometime during the 3rd nine-week grading period, it became all too clear that new seating arrangements were necessary. Frequently interrupted by small chatter and off-task behavior, attention was becoming increasingly difficult to maintain during instruction. In line with my philosophy of discipline, I decided to make a change to the assigned seating arrangements in hopes that it would make a major difference in appropriate classroom behavior. My artifact is an example of the new seating chart created for my 1st period. Normally my quietest and most well behaved class, 1st period was seeing an increase in out of turn answers, distracted conversations and lax classroom procedures. In fact, students were eager to ask when their next seating arrangement would be ready to use. I learned something valuable in creating the new seating arrangements for my four classes of Advanced Language Arts. One, it is no easy task to arrange each individual student in a way that promotes the best possible learning environment for all. I also took the approach to divide and conquer several students who seemed to disrupt class together the most. Two, sometimes it is best to place certain students in close proximity to someone they feel most comfortable sharing ideas with. This makes for a more productive and effective classroom environment for all, even those shy or less likely to engage students. Lastly, I learned that seating arrangements should be flexible. Making a seating chart on paper is only the first step.
  52. 52. Seeing how the actual layout of the classroom looks after students have taken their new seats will determine how effective the new assignments will be. My artifact demonstrates my ability to monitor and respond to student misbehavior. The new seating chart produced as evidence shows the new seats arranged for students. I observed the disruptions occurring in the classroom and developed a new seating arrangement as a result of these minor, yet troublesome, episodes. Care was also given to special circumstances, such as an influx of students from the IDEA Language Arts classes into Advanced Language Arts. This influx of students dramatically changed the entire atmosphere of certain classes’ overnight; especially my fifth period, the class presented as my artifact. The addition of just three students completely altered the dynamics and forced me to make decisions in regards to seating and where these students would best fit the established environment. It also demonstrates my ability to evaluate specific learners needs and differentiate the classroom environment to create the best learning environment for them. For example, two students were purposefully seated next to each other after I observed their obvious friendship and the need for one of them to be seated in close proximity to someone they could freely open up to. This student in particular struggles to communicate in whole group discussion, and yet completes assignments that demonstrate that he is in fact learning. I was able to create an environment that was best
  53. 53. for everyone, and for all.
  54. 54. INTASC Principle Five Artifact #2: Philosophy of Discipline The artifact is my personal philosophy of discipline. The development of this philosophy is in combination with four years working and learning at the secondary level, and also with my previous six years working at a daycare facility. Many would think that working with small children has no correlation to working with young adolescents, but there is a significant advantage to experiencing discipline and behavior management at the youngest level. Children learn behavior modification and classroom procedures at a very young age in a pre-school setting. My years spent teaching these simple, yet effective, procedures to young children taught me a lot about what behaviors warrant a specific response. My philosophy is based on mutual respect between teacher and student, performing small modifications along the way, and maintaining an environment where discipline is not to the detriment of instruction. I have learned that discipline is an on-going evolution of ideas and reality. When put into certain situations I believe I succeeded to a moderate degree to uphold all of the principles of my discipline philosophy. I learned that it is harder that I anticipated catching every misbehaving incident in class, but that it is important to respond consistently when I do. Management is best served in advanced. By eliminating the opportunity for students to misbehave, I will save myself instruction time later on down the line. Most importantly I learned that students will do what I allow them to. If
  55. 55. I am firm on my convictions, and true to my word I am less likely to encounter the same misbehavior twice. The artifact demonstrates my ability to create an action plan for student misbehavior. When I completed this philosophy I tried to imagine every possible disruptive scenario I was likely to encounter. Of course, this was impossible, but I believe this philosophy statement covers the major platforms for which I believe in. Early intervention, quick and consistent response, and mutual respect cover these essential platforms to discipline.
  56. 56. Philosophy of Discipline Discipline and classroom management exist as an additional learning experience for students. Good discipline should come from a desire to teach students to self-assess and self-regulate their own learning and behavior. A student who is well-disciplined in nature understands what is socially and personally acceptable within their social community. Good discipline should also be based upon mutual respect for the learning environment of those around them. Students should feel responsible for creating and maintaining a classroom environment conducive to learning. The well-disciplined student understands that disruptions during learning is unfair and unproductive to the classroom’s communal objectives. Effective classroom management helps ensure student success in regulating their behavior by eliminating many unnecessary problems within the classroom. I find that for my philosophy of discipline and management to be realized in the classroom, rules and guidelines must be made in collaboration with the students for whom will be most affected. From an adolescent standpoint, the secondary levels are a time of great personal discovery, as well as dramatic physical and cognitive changes. Naturally curious and rebellious, discipline and classroom management strategies for a secondary classroom are best served with a helping of understanding to support their presence. If students are able to realize why a certain action or reaction,
  57. 57. within the classroom, is inappropriate they are more likely to self-regulate their behavior. If rules and guidelines are made in collaboration, students are also more like to take ownership of themselves. When a student misbehaves in the classroom, the reaction of the teacher should match the behavior. Small problems, such as disruptive side conversations or off-task behavior, can be dissolved by closing the proximity between the teacher and student. More severe, or especially out-of- character behavior, should be handled with care and consideration to student and incident. It can be tempting to be placed in a situation where a student misbehaves, verbally reprimand the student and move on. This method of discipline lacks purpose and in fact does not fix the undesired behavior. In fact, it tends to postpone the said behaviors’ inevitable return in the future. If something severe enough occurs, the teacher should have a private conversation with the student. In this conversation the teacher should express interest in why the student behaved, and together the student and teacher should come up with other possible reactions. Ultimately rules and guidelines are for the safety of everyone, ensuring all students have a positive environment in which to learn from. Yelling, screaming, force, and unnecessary tension do not need to occur for students to behave. Students who are engaged in what they are learning are less likely to engage in disruptive behavior. For those students who do misbehave, there is a model for which teachers should approach discipline.
  58. 58. INTASC Six: Communicates The student teacher has knowledge of effective verbal, nonverbal, and media communication techniques to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom.
  59. 59. INTASC Principle Six Artifact #1: Samples of Student-Generated Prediction Questions Week 6 of cluster focused on the D-step Part 2. In D-step Part 2 teachers were supposed to begin to model the process of creating a prediction question. I took this assignment from cluster and applied it to an upcoming frontloading activity for the non-fiction article, “Over the Top”. First, students previewed the cover photo and the article’s title. Then, students were given a half-slip of paper and asked to make two predictions about the article and one prediction question. The evidence provided for this INTASC principle shows the prediction questions generated by students, as well as the instruction plan from my LAMP unit in which this lesson was taught. In preparation for this frontloading activity, I generated my own prediction questions with the anticipation for the level I thought students would perform. Students far outreached my expectations, and genuinely surprised me. The level of generated questions ranged from surface level to abstract, with many students relying on their previous predictions to guide their questioning. This is the result I wanted to occur. Using the idea from cluster to build the foundation for this activity, I learned that my students would often exceed each week’s goals and expectations. What I also learned is that students benefit from collaborating their questions with their classmates. When I had students turn to their neighbors and exchange their questions I heard the collaborative enthusiasm that teachers look for.
  60. 60. This artifact demonstrates my competence on the INTASC principle because it shows my ability to not only communicate strategies between professional workshops to the classroom, but also to stimulate curiosity and conversation through the use of a student-generated question. The instruction plan accompanying the handout as evidence also shows my ability to insight conversations and activate student prior knowledge.
  61. 61. Materials “From Pompeii to Yellowstone” extended response HL assignment Vocabulary in Context handouts Prediction handouts “Over the Top” article Technology SmartBoard ELMO Projector Photocopier White Board Objectives o Students will be able to define vocabulary using context clues. o Students will be able to make predictions based on text features. o Students will be able to evaluate predictions using evidence presented in the text. Motivation/Engagement If you were a volcanologist entering a live volcano, what kinds of things would you want to know before your descent? What kinds of things do you predict you would need to bring? Think of the danger! Write me a small narrative telling me what you would do, what you would bring and how you would feel. Class/Grade: McDougal – 8th Date to be Taught: February 25, 2014 Student Name: Vicki Judge Subject/Topic: Language Arts/ Prediction/ “Over the Top” Common Core Standards: • English Language Arts: CCSS RI 8.4 – Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choice on meaning and tone. Including analogies or allusions to other texts. Indiana Standards: • English Language Arts: EL.8.1.3 – Verify the meaning of a word in its context, even when its meaning is not directly stated, through the use of definition, restatement, example, comparison or contrast. • English Language Arts: EL.8.2.9 – Make reasonable statements and draw conclusions about a text, supporting them with accurate examples.
  62. 62. Goal for Learner Yesterday we learned about a very famous and powerful volcanic eruption at Pompeii. Today we are going to look at the people who dedicate their lives to understanding volcanoes, and those who choose to interact with them on a daily basis. Content and Procedure 1. Smart Start (8 minutes) a. If you were a volcanologist entering a live volcano, what kinds of things would you want to know before your descent? What kinds of things do you predict you would need to bring? Think of the danger! Write me a small narrative telling me what you would do, what you would bring and how you would feel. 2. Review Smart Start (4 minutes) a. Allow volunteers to share their short narratives 3. Turn in HL assignment from yesterday and REVIEW (10 minutes) a. Review the answers i. Call on volunteers and non-volunteers 4. Vocabulary in Context Practice (10 minutes) a. Model example for the word “scale” b. Release students to complete the handout in class c. Advise students to keep the handout 5. Pass out a Prediction Handout (remainder) a. Flash title i. Students should make first prediction b. Flash cover photo i. Students should make second prediction c. Generate ONE Prediction question i. Model the example on the half-slip ii. Allow students to collaborate their question with a shoulder partner 6. Preview the night’s reading on the ELMO projector 7. HL: Read “Over the Top”
  63. 63. Name Date Period Making Predictions Based on the title, I can predict today’s reading will be about . I came up with this prediction because The photograph of Carsten Peter suggests that his job is to . I came up with this prediction because Generate ONE prediction question for tonight’s reading! (I.e. Why would Goldilocks go into a house full of bears?)
  64. 64. INTASC Principle Six Artifact #2: LAMP Technology Narrative + Images The use of the available technology provided me with an immense advantage in the classroom. It was essential to the running of everyday instruction and my LAMP unit. My evidence for INTASC principle 6 is the use of technology within my LAMP and documented examples of technology being used to provide non-verbal interaction within the classroom. The technology resources available in the classroom include one SmartBoard, an ELMO Projector, a desktop computer, and two white boards. These resources provided the opportunity for engaging activities and meaningful learning experiences to be shared with students. The two most heavily used technology resources were the SmartBoard and desktop computer. An up-to-date agenda was kept up on the SmartBoard for students to view. The SmartBoard/desktop computer combination also provided the resource for showing online images, Tumblr writing prompts, YouTube videos and other supplementary learning resources. The front white boards provided the space to display the daily learning objectives referenced throughout instruction. The other white board was used to foster active inquiry of a text, collaborate and brainstorm
  65. 65. ideas. What I learned is that technology is not limited to the things that can be plugged into the wall. Educational technology can refer to a broad spectrum of tools and material objects that provide educational opportunities to all learners. Whether it be the SmartBoard against the wall or simple chalk, technology provides the communication tool between teacher and student. Second, I realized the importance of technology as a classroom management tool. The SmartBoard stands in the middle of the room and I often used its proximity to focus student attention. This type of non-verbal communication demonstrates my ability to use technology as a supportive interactive tool. The constant reliability of the agenda being projected up on the SmartBoard also gave students a procedure when looking for what to do next. This artifact demonstrates my competence on the INTASC principle by showing that I understand how to apply the available technology to a variety of purposes. Shown above is my use of technology as a procedural tool. Every day, students could count of the agenda being up-to-date, the objectives being displayed and a quote on the white board. Students could also count on technology to provide a supportive interaction between themselves and their
  66. 66. learning. Videos, images and models were displayed on the SmartBoard via the ELMO Projector and provided the visual example that appealed to all learners. Lastly, my LAMP Technology narrative explains how technology was implemented throughout the entirety of my LAMP unit. Mostly notably, technology provided the tools for learning in my LAMP unit to occur.
  67. 67. Technology Technology is an essential component to any classroom. It provides engaging activities and meaningful learning experiences when used correctly. For the purpose of my LAMP project I chose to use technology in a way that students were already familiar with. The unit itself used such resources so that they would not be distracted from their learning environment. This unit required a photocopier, SmartBoard, ELMO Projector, desktop computer and the two large white boards on the walls. Photocopier – The PMMS photocopier was used to make copies of instructional handouts, excerpts of novels and short stories, Smart Starts, and newspaper clippings. SmartBoard - There is a SmartBoard within every classroom of the PMMS community, and it was absolutely essential to the running of my LAMP project. The SmartBoard is an interactive, wall-mounted white board that merges the desktop computer and its own application abilities to make a technology friendly classroom environment. I used the SmartBoard to display the daily agenda, embed multimedia resources into my lesson plans, corral student attention, and differentiate instruction to spatial, auditory and kinesthetic learners. ELMO Projector- The ELMO Projector served as a resource when I needed to model my thinking onto paper. The ELMO also has the availability of color, which allowed me to use multi-colored pens and paper, and display images for the entire class to see. I used the ELMO multiple times to display new seating charts, images, and excerpts from the textbook. Desktop Computer – The Windows Desktop computer was utilized as a resource for crowd sourcing information to the SmartBoard, ELMO Projector, World Wide Web and students.
  68. 68. White Board- The two large white boards on either side of the classroom served as a display board for the daily objectives, collaborative notes, Smart Starts and student-led learning. INTASC Seven: Plans and Integrates The student teacher plans instruction based upon knowledge of the subject matter, students, the community, and curriculum goals.
  69. 69. INTASC Principle Seven Artifact #1: LAMP Pre-Test I gave my students a pre-test before beginning my LAMP unit. The pre- test assessed for specific criteria and content mastery levels. As a part of the LAMP unit requirements my pre-test featured a variety of questions including multiple choice, fill in the blank and a short answer response. There were seven questions assessing vocabulary comprehension, three questions assessing main idea identification and one short answer writing assessment. By completing a pre-test, I had the authentic data to perform accommodations to future instructional plans. This pre-test also assessed student knowledge of content. I did not want to cover material that students already mastered previous to my LAMP unit. The pre-test would become invaluable to the planning and implementation of the content to my LAMP unit. I learned many things by creating this pre-test. I learned that creating authentic questions geared to students exact understanding is more difficult than it appears. My pre-test results were skewed due to errors in the question complexity level. However I did learn that it is important to know exactly where students are at before beginning a new unit. Despite the skew of student results, I found some useful information embedded in the pre-test’s raw data. I also found this pre-test assessment useful when compare to the result of the LAMP post-test.
  70. 70. Adjustments were made to the LAMP unit plan after reviewing the pre-test results, and it made for more engaging and challenging instructional plans. My evidence demonstrates my competence on the INTASC principle by displaying my ability to pre-assess student understanding of content and knowledge, and apply it to future instructional plans. It shows that I can evaluate raw data collected through a pre-test and determine the best course of action based on the needs of my students. My evidence demonstrates my understanding of my individual student’s needs as advanced learners.
  71. 71. Pre-Test  Student Version HELP MISS JUDGE OUT  Name _____________________________ Date _________________________ Period ________________________ For each item below, underline the examples that suggest the meaning of the italicized term. Then circle the letter of the meaning of that term. 1. Today I had to deal with one mishap after another. I couldn’t find my car keys, I dropped a bowl of soup at lunchtime, and my computer crashed twice. Mishap means A. Unlucky accident B. Event C. Unexpected occurrence 2. Some mentally ill people have bizarre ideas. For instance, they may think the TV is talking to them or that others can steal their thoughts. Bizarre means A. Funny B. Ordinary C. Odd 3. Some animals have remarkable longevity. For example, the giant land tortoise can live several hundred years. Longevity means A. Appearances B. length of life C. Endurance Using the context clues for help, select the definition for each italicized words from the options provided. Then write the letter of the definition in the space provided. Each definition will be used once. 4. I would not just be glad if I won the lottery; I’d be ecstatic. Ecstatic means _______________________ A. Discouraged B. Overjoyed C. Provided
  72. 72. 5. Nature has endowed hummingbirds with the ability to fly backward. Endowed means _______________________ 6. Opponents of the death penalty say it has never actually deterred anyone from committing murder. Deterred means ______________________ Use context clues to figure out the meaning of the italicized word in the following textbook passage. Write your definition in the spaces provided. 1 Although mysteries and science fiction may seem like very different kinds of writing, the two forms share some basic similarities. 2 First of all, both are action- directed, emphasizing plot at the expense of character development. 3 Possibly for this reason, both types of literature have been scorned by critics as being merely “entertainment” rather than “literature.” 4 But this attack is unjustified, for both mysteries and science fiction share a concern with moral issues. 5 Science fiction often raises the question of whether or not scientific advances are of benefit to humanity. 6 And a mystery story rarely ends without the culpable person being brought to justice. 7. Scorned means __________________________________________________________. Read this paragraph. Then answer questions 13-14 below. Southern California is known for its tourist attractions and its theme parks. People come from all over the world to get a look at Hollywood, and such things as the "Walk of Fame" where many celebrities’ names are found on gold stars on Hollywood Boulevard. Tourists are also attracted to the area with hopes of catching sight of the movie stars who live in the hills surrounding Los Angeles. Many visitors come to shop in the glamorous shops on Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills. Among the theme parks that attract visitors are Disneyland in Anaheim, Knott’s Berry Farm, Magic Mountain Amusement Park, and Raging Waters park. Folks who want to combine tourist attractions and theme parks can visit Universal Studios which offers both. 8. Identify the sentence where the main idea is located. A. In the first sentence B. In the last sentence C. In the middle of the paragraph D. In two sentences of the paragraph E. Not stated in the paragraph directly (implied)
  73. 73. 9. Which of the following statements best states the main idea of this passage? A. Disneyland is famous all over the world. B. Have you ever been to Southern California? C. Most tourists enjoy Southern California. D. Southern California has both tourist attractions and theme parks for visitors. E. Many movie starts live in the Southern California area. 10. Which of the following would be the best title for this passage? A. “Disneyland: Southern California’s Hottest Attraction” B. “Southern California -- Paradise” C. “Come Sail Away To California” D. “Southern California: California’s Largest Tourist Attraction” You have been chosen to give a talk to sixth grade students from the Perry Meridian 6th Grade Academy. You have to explain how life at Perry Meridian Middle School is different than the Academy. Write a short answer response explaining to sixth graders what you find more fun. Explain what you find more difficult. What can they do to prepare themselves for middle school. Before you begin, identify which genre of writing this prompt is intending for you to write: persuasive, expository, or a narrative. Then, underline the cue words. Finally, organize your short answer response based on the genre. (Your response should be NO LESS than 6 sentences!) Mastery  90% or better
  74. 74. Pre-Test  Teacher Version Name ______________________ Date _________________________ Period ________________________ For each item below, underline the examples that suggest the meaning of the italicized term. Then circle the letter of the meaning of that term. 1. Today I had to deal with one mishap after another. I couldn’t find my car keys, I dropped a bowl of soup at lunchtime, and my computer crashed twice. (CCSS RI 8.4) Mishap means A. Unlucky accident B. Event C. Unexpected question 2. Some mentally ill people have bizarre ideas. For instance, they may think the TV is talking to them or that others can steal their thoughts. (CCSS RI 8.4) Bizarre means A. Limited B. Ordinary C. Odd 3. Some animals have remarkable longevity. For example, the giant land tortoise can live several hundred years. (CCSS RI 8.4) Longevity means A. Appearances B. length of life C. Habits Using the context clues for help, writing the definition for each italicized words. Then write the letter of the definition in the space provided. Choose from the definitions in the box below. Each definition will be used once. 4. I would not just be glad if I won the lottery; I’d be ecstatic. (CCSS RI 8.4) Ecstatic means ________B_______________ A. Discouraged B. Overjoyed C. Provided

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