Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
xmlsummerschool.com Slide 1
Licensed under a Creative Commons
Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License
s...
Learning objectives
By the end of this session, you’ll have the answers to
the following 3 questions:
1. Why should I be i...
Part 1: Why does user research
matter?
XML Summer School 2015 3
What makes a bad website?
Chances are you’ll say it’s one that makes it hard to
find the information you need or difficult...
Imagine a supermarket with no labels
XML Summer School 2015 5
Why does this happen?
• The site doesn’t speak the users’ language
• There’s little or no ‘information scent’
• The inform...
What are the costs?
• It can prevent someone from doing their job
properly
• People waste time and money
• They get frustr...
As Jakob Nielsen says…
“On the web, if a site is
difficult to use, most people
will leave.”
XML Summer School 2015 8
So how do you prevent this?
• Do some user research!
• How many of you have ever been involved in any
user research? What ...
What we’re going to cover
• Why user research is important for everyone
• What it is
• Tools and techniques
• How to avoid...
Why is user research important for you?
XML Summer School 2015 11
http://alistapart.com/blog/post/developing-empathy
As a developer recently blogged…
XML Summer School 2015 12
And it’s important to me because…
I’m an Information
Architect.
It’s my job to organise,
label and group content in
ways t...
XML Summer School 2015 14
https://insidegovuk.blog.gov.uk/2015/07/14/rebuilding-browse-based-on-user-needs/
Why user research is crucial in IA
• The way we organise data affects the people who
use it
• There’s not much point in or...
XML Summer School 2015 16
How would you classify these?
• Sweets?
• Confectionery?
• Chocolates?
• Something else?
XML Summer School 2015 17
Language is tricky
• People use different words to describe the same
thing: Courgette/zucchini? Chips/crisps?
Aubergine/eg...
Context affects how we label things
• IAs try to design labels that speak the same
language as the site’s users
• They’re ...
http://alistapart.com/blog/post/developing-empathy
Back to the developer…
XML Summer School 2015 20
What do I actually mean by user research?
• User research isn’t just usability testing
• It’s about learning the whole pic...
Yes, you say, but I already know about my
users. They’re just like me!
• Although it’s very tempting, you can’t assume you...
Developing empathy
XML Summer School 2015 23
http://alistapart.com/blog/post/developing-empathy
What do we want to learn?
• About users’ mental models: how do people
currently understand a topic? What kind of picture
h...
Overall benefits
• People’s emotional needs and motivations are
more stable over time than shifting technologies,
so havin...
Part 2: Tools and techniques
XML Summer School 2015 26
Framework for the overall process
• Define hypotheses/assumptions to test
• Explore whether your assumptions are correct a...
Mixing and matching the tool kit
• A wide range of methods are available
• Best to mix and match according to need and
com...
Some quantitative methods
• Site analytics
• Search log analysis
• Surveys
• A/B testing
XML Summer School 2015 29
Site analytics
The GOV.UK performance
dashboard shows us the most
popular content, device usage,
seasonal patterns in usag...
Site analytics
Great for:
• Identifying interesting patterns or behaviours for
more probing follow-up research
• Measuring...
Search log analysis
Great for:
• Seeing what your users are looking for expressed in
their own language
• Determining labe...
Search log analysis
For example, looking at terms people
are searching for from specific pages
(on-page searches in Google...
Surveys
Great for:
• Reaching a broad audience
• Finding out about demographics
• Getting lots of data from a large number...
A/B testing
What is it?
Also known as “multivariate testing,” “live testing,”
or “bucket testing”: a method of scientifica...
A/B testing
Great for:
• Measuring the live impact of design changes on
key business metrics (# orders, registrations etc....
A/B testing example
GOV.UK compared a new
design of the Contact
page with the old design.
Of 50,000 people who
came to the...
Some qualitative techniques
• Contextual inquiry (discovery phase)
• User interviews (discovery phase)
• Personas (discove...
Contextual inquiry
What happens?
Researchers meet with and study participants in
their natural environment.
GOV.UK childca...
Contextual inquiry
Great for:
• Observing how users interact with information in
their natural settings – better than aski...
User interviews
What happens?
Researchers meet with participants one-on-one to
discuss in depth what the participant think...
User interviews
Great for:
• Gathering rich, deep understanding about people’s
information needs
• Capturing users’ langua...
ACTIVITY (20 mins) - interviews
Get into groups of 3 and interview each other about
mental models related to cooking and r...
Personas
XML Summer School 2015 44
https://assisteddigital.blog.gov.uk/2014/08/28/assisted-digital-user-personas/
Personas
Great for:
• Simple collaborative exercise to get everyone on the
team to start thinking about users
• Bringing t...
Usability testing
(not ‘user testing’!)
Great for:
• Highlighting usability issues and providing
qualitative insights abou...
Only 5 participants? Yes, really…
http://www.nngroup.com/articles/why-you-only-need-to-test-with-5-users/
XML Summer Schoo...
Pop-up usability testing
XML Summer School 2015 48
GOV.UK childcare example
We did remote un-moderated usability testing with
parents to see how well they could find relevan...
Some qual/quant methods
• Card sorting
• Tree testing
• Diary studies
XML Summer School 2015 50
Card sorting
What happens?
Users are asked to organise
items on cards into groups and
assign category labels to each
group...
Card sorting
Great for:
• Simple, cheap and fun way to learn about how
users group and label information in a specific
dom...
GOV.UK childcare example
We did a remote online card sort of content with 100
parents to see whether the initial groupings...
ACTIVITY (15 mins) – card sorting of recipes
Get into teams and sort these recipe cards into
groups that make sense to you...
Tree testing
What happens?
Users are asked to find information in a simplified
version of the site’s hierarchy. This tests...
Tree testing
Great for:
• Measuring how well users find items in a defined
hierarchy
• Testing labels you’re not sure abou...
GOV.UK childcare example
We tree-tested the categories we came up with after
the card sorting to check that they made sens...
Diary studies
What happens?
Participants are given a mechanism (e.g. diary or
camera) to record and describe aspects of th...
Diary studies
Great for:
• Tracking ongoing relationships with your users over
time
Limitations:
• Diary studies are typic...
Part 3: Challenges and extracting
value
XML Summer School 2015 60
Challenges
• Budget
• Planning
• Doing
• Analysis
• Reporting
XML Summer School 2015 61
Budget
“We don’t have any time or money for research!”
• It doesn’t have to be slow or expensive
• Main costs = people’s t...
Planning
Defining the right problems to solve
• Quantitative techniques can help you start
• Be clear about the objectives...
Doing: recruiting your participants
• You need a representative sample
• Do the recruitment yourself or outsource it
• Rec...
Doing: on the day
Consent and ethics
• You’ll need to get participants’ permission to
record and their consent to use the ...
Analysis
• The process than transforms your research data
into deliverables that can make an impact
• Don’t skimp on this ...
Reporting
• User research is only as good as the impact it has,
so it’s important to communicate your findings
• Use quota...
Wrap-up
XML Summer School 2015 68
Summary
• Talk to your users regularly about their needs
• User research doesn’t always happen in a lab
• Identify your ta...
Resources
Steve Krug’s books:
- Don’t Make Me Think
- Rocket Surgery Made Easy
Online resources:
https://userresearch.blog...
Final thoughts
What difference would user research make to the
products you’re working on?
Remember…
• The costs of users ...
Here’s something for you to try
Friends and family ‘guerilla’ usability testing
• A fast, easy, convenient technique
• Sho...
summer school
xmlsummerschool.com Slide 73
Licensed under a Creative Commons
Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 Int...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Your data is great, but does it work for your users

178 views

Published on

How can you be confident that you’re organising and labelling your content in ways that best meet the needs of the people using it? What appears logical in the data may not turn out to reflect the way your users see the world. It’s tempting to make assumptions about your users based on your own experiences, but it’s far better to find out directly from the users themselves. For effective information architecture (IA), user research is crucial for developing knowledge about users’ information seeking behaviours, the trigger words they're looking for, and how they understand the subject domain.

In this session we’ll look at what user research is and the role it plays in figuring out how to structure successful content-rich websites. We’ll take a whistle-stop tour of a toolbox of user research tools and techniques, and how to mix and match the methods to get the best results. For example, during a typical IA project you’d aim to balance the insights gained from search log and usage data analysis with more qualitative techniques such as interviews (to learn about people's information needs), card sorts (to get a sense of how people group and label content) and tree tests (to find out how people look for content). We’ll also briefly cover personas, surveys, contextual inquiry, usability testing, A/B testing, and diary studies. We’ll use examples to show how a better understanding of your users can help you to support them in finding what they need.

You’ll discover why it’s always important to do user research, what methods to use when, and how to avoid some of the potential pitfalls (like recruiting the wrong participants, asking the wrong types of questions, or doing the research in the wrong phase of a project). We’ll also discuss the challenges of finding the time and resources to do the research in the first place, framing it in order to challenge your assumptions, and finally making sure you can deliver value from it in ways that will most benefit your users.

Published in: Internet
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Your data is great, but does it work for your users

  1. 1. xmlsummerschool.com Slide 1 Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License summer school An introduction to user research Vicky Buser Information Architect Your data is great, but does it work for your users? 16 September 2015
  2. 2. Learning objectives By the end of this session, you’ll have the answers to the following 3 questions: 1. Why should I be interested in user research? 2. What tools and techniques are available? 3. How can I extract most value from the research? XML Summer School 2015 2
  3. 3. Part 1: Why does user research matter? XML Summer School 2015 3
  4. 4. What makes a bad website? Chances are you’ll say it’s one that makes it hard to find the information you need or difficult to carry out the transaction you want to make. Sometimes sites hide useful information under improbable menu headings, or none at all. XML Summer School 2015 4
  5. 5. Imagine a supermarket with no labels XML Summer School 2015 5
  6. 6. Why does this happen? • The site doesn’t speak the users’ language • There’s little or no ‘information scent’ • The information is organised in ways that don’t match the users’ mental models of the domain XML Summer School 2015 6
  7. 7. What are the costs? • It can prevent someone from doing their job properly • People waste time and money • They get frustrated • The site’s credibility is damaged • The site doesn’t get repeat traffic • For commercial sites, the company loses money XML Summer School 2015 7
  8. 8. As Jakob Nielsen says… “On the web, if a site is difficult to use, most people will leave.” XML Summer School 2015 8
  9. 9. So how do you prevent this? • Do some user research! • How many of you have ever been involved in any user research? What did you do? • The joy of user research is that there are many tools and techniques you can use to suit the specific constraints of your project • Doing user research is the thing I’ve always enjoyed most about my job • Users (people) will always surprise you and act in unpredictable ways XML Summer School 2015 9
  10. 10. What we’re going to cover • Why user research is important for everyone • What it is • Tools and techniques • How to avoid some of the pitfalls • How to extract most value from your findings XML Summer School 2015 10
  11. 11. Why is user research important for you? XML Summer School 2015 11
  12. 12. http://alistapart.com/blog/post/developing-empathy As a developer recently blogged… XML Summer School 2015 12
  13. 13. And it’s important to me because… I’m an Information Architect. It’s my job to organise, label and group content in ways that help people find what they’re looking for. User research is a really important part of getting this right. XML Summer School 2015 13
  14. 14. XML Summer School 2015 14 https://insidegovuk.blog.gov.uk/2015/07/14/rebuilding-browse-based-on-user-needs/
  15. 15. Why user research is crucial in IA • The way we organise data affects the people who use it • There’s not much point in organising things in ways that don’t help people find what they’re looking for • People have different ways of looking for the same information, depending on the context • Language can be very ambiguous • How you organise things depends on your audience XML Summer School 2015 15
  16. 16. XML Summer School 2015 16
  17. 17. How would you classify these? • Sweets? • Confectionery? • Chocolates? • Something else? XML Summer School 2015 17
  18. 18. Language is tricky • People use different words to describe the same thing: Courgette/zucchini? Chips/crisps? Aubergine/eggplant? Coriander/cilantro? Sweet/desert/pudding? • Specialists may use different language to the layperson: Pharmacovigilance/Drug safety? Residency/Living in the UK? • The same words can be understood in more than one way: mercury, fly, fast, fair • Language is always changing: Chavs, mentally retarded (examples from BBC Archives) XML Summer School 2015 18
  19. 19. Context affects how we label things • IAs try to design labels that speak the same language as the site’s users • They’re an important part of the information scent - the hints a user gets from words/labels • Labels must be user centric not organisation centric • Given that there’s always an element of messy subjectivity with labelling, it’s important to validate them with rigorous user research XML Summer School 2015 19
  20. 20. http://alistapart.com/blog/post/developing-empathy Back to the developer… XML Summer School 2015 20
  21. 21. What do I actually mean by user research? • User research isn’t just usability testing • It’s about learning the whole picture rather than just what happens on the day • It’s an ongoing activity throughout the product cycle • It’s investigating and analysing what your users need to inform your site’s strategy • And then validating or disproving design assumptions, such as “Practitioners need different browse structures to the general public on GOV.UK” XML Summer School 2015 21
  22. 22. Yes, you say, but I already know about my users. They’re just like me! • Although it’s very tempting, you can’t assume your users are like you • You are not your user – you’re far too close to the data/product/content • It’s all too easy to think that other people think about things the same way that you do • But you need to test these assumptions and provide evidence to support or challenge them XML Summer School 2015 22
  23. 23. Developing empathy XML Summer School 2015 23 http://alistapart.com/blog/post/developing-empathy
  24. 24. What do we want to learn? • About users’ mental models: how do people currently understand a topic? What kind of picture have they built for themselves about how a given task is done or organised? • What do users consider most important? • What are the names and relationships between the terms people use? • What’s the larger picture of the problem we’re trying to solve? • What are the users’ needs? XML Summer School 2015 24
  25. 25. Overall benefits • People’s emotional needs and motivations are more stable over time than shifting technologies, so having an in-depth understanding of your users will help you adapt more easily to new technology • User research is good for getting consensus/settling arguments: rather than guessing what your users need, you can find out • Helps to prioritise features so you don’t waste time developing features users don’t need XML Summer School 2015 25
  26. 26. Part 2: Tools and techniques XML Summer School 2015 26
  27. 27. Framework for the overall process • Define hypotheses/assumptions to test • Explore whether your assumptions are correct and then modify your tests based on your findings • Act on your findings to improve the site • Continue to experiment and iterate • Ask “How can we always get better?” XML Summer School 2015 27
  28. 28. Mixing and matching the tool kit • A wide range of methods are available • Best to mix and match according to need and combine insights • Here is a selection of some of the most commonly used techniques… XML Summer School 2015 28
  29. 29. Some quantitative methods • Site analytics • Search log analysis • Surveys • A/B testing XML Summer School 2015 29
  30. 30. Site analytics The GOV.UK performance dashboard shows us the most popular content, device usage, seasonal patterns in usage etc. XML Summer School 2015 30
  31. 31. Site analytics Great for: • Identifying interesting patterns or behaviours for more probing follow-up research • Measuring improvements (success metrics) Look for: • Usage patterns, traffic cycles, key user journeys through the site, drop-off points, device and platform usage Limitations: • Tells you what users do but not why they do it XML Summer School 2015 31
  32. 32. Search log analysis Great for: • Seeing what your users are looking for expressed in their own language • Determining labels that speak the user’s language • Gathering useful information about what users want from your site and how they articulate their needs Look for: • Acronyms, jargon, new words, length of search queries, common misspellings XML Summer School 2015 32
  33. 33. Search log analysis For example, looking at terms people are searching for from specific pages (on-page searches in Google Analytics) can highlight problems when users aren’t finding the specific information they’re looking for on that page – e.g. a specific form. XML Summer School 2015 33
  34. 34. Surveys Great for: • Reaching a broad audience • Finding out about demographics • Getting lots of data from a large number of users Limitations: • Surveys need to be well designed to be effective (survey design and analysis are specialised fields of research) • Best for eliciting facts rather than a deep understanding of user behaviours XML Summer School 2015 34
  35. 35. A/B testing What is it? Also known as “multivariate testing,” “live testing,” or “bucket testing”: a method of scientifically testing different designs on a site by randomly assigning groups of users to interact with each of the different designs and measuring the effect of these assignments on user behavior. XML Summer School 2015 35
  36. 36. A/B testing Great for: • Measuring the live impact of design changes on key business metrics (# orders, registrations etc.) • Researching design patterns for small changes to transactions Limitations: • Can be hard to frame as a sensible experiment • Many ways to do it wrong • Creates a focus on short-term improvements, so shouldn’t be used in isolation XML Summer School 2015 36
  37. 37. A/B testing example GOV.UK compared a new design of the Contact page with the old design. Of 50,000 people who came to the contact page, the new design helped 1000 more of them get contact details. https://gds.blog.gov.uk/2014/05/09/using-ab-testing-to-make-things-better/ XML Summer School 2015 37
  38. 38. Some qualitative techniques • Contextual inquiry (discovery phase) • User interviews (discovery phase) • Personas (discovery phase) • Usability testing (design and build) XML Summer School 2015 38
  39. 39. Contextual inquiry What happens? Researchers meet with and study participants in their natural environment. GOV.UK childcare and parenting example: user researchers visited 16 families in their homes and listened to their experiences of becoming a parent. XML Summer School 2015 39
  40. 40. Contextual inquiry Great for: • Observing how users interact with information in their natural settings – better than asking about it • Providing environmental context (useful when physical materials are involved in the process) Tip: • Observe people doing their daily tasks and ask them about their pain points Limitations: • Can be time consuming to set up and run XML Summer School 2015 40
  41. 41. User interviews What happens? Researchers meet with participants one-on-one to discuss in depth what the participant thinks about the topic in question. XML Summer School 2015 41
  42. 42. User interviews Great for: • Gathering rich, deep understanding about people’s information needs • Capturing users’ language and how they refer to content Tip: • Listen to the words people use (jargon, acronyms) Limitations: • Can be time-consuming to set up and run • Sensible to talk to a few people initially and then consider where to go next XML Summer School 2015 42
  43. 43. ACTIVITY (20 mins) - interviews Get into groups of 3 and interview each other about mental models related to cooking and recipes, based on this script I’ve prepared. 1 person ask the questions, 1 person answer the questions and 1 person take notes. • To the interviewer: remember to listen • To the note taker: Try to record as many of the responses as verbatim as possible, so you can re- use quotes for illustrations • For the interviewee: Try to be natural and answer the questions honestly. There are no right or wrong answers Take it in turns so that by the end you have three interview transcripts. XML Summer School 2015 43
  44. 44. Personas XML Summer School 2015 44 https://assisteddigital.blog.gov.uk/2014/08/28/assisted-digital-user-personas/
  45. 45. Personas Great for: • Simple collaborative exercise to get everyone on the team to start thinking about users • Bringing the user to life, developing empathy • Focusing on target users • Standing in for real users to guide decisions about design and functionality Tip: • Base your personas on evidence, the details should be factual – and get the whole team involved Limitations: • Not a substitute for talking to real users XML Summer School 2015 45
  46. 46. Usability testing (not ‘user testing’!) Great for: • Highlighting usability issues and providing qualitative insights about the problems • Focus, depth, recordings (if using a lab) Tips: • Ask open, neutral questions, get users to ‘think aloud’, and use self-directed tasks if possible Limitations: • It’s an artificial and unnatural environment • Doesn’t tell you how big a problem is XML Summer School 2015 46
  47. 47. Only 5 participants? Yes, really… http://www.nngroup.com/articles/why-you-only-need-to-test-with-5-users/ XML Summer School 2015 47
  48. 48. Pop-up usability testing XML Summer School 2015 48
  49. 49. GOV.UK childcare example We did remote un-moderated usability testing with parents to see how well they could find relevant information on GOV.UK in it’s previous structure. We found that parents were visiting 3, 4, sometimes even 5 categories before finding the right one. XML Summer School 2015 49
  50. 50. Some qual/quant methods • Card sorting • Tree testing • Diary studies XML Summer School 2015 50
  51. 51. Card sorting What happens? Users are asked to organise items on cards into groups and assign category labels to each group. This helps create or refine a site’s IA by exposing users’ mental models. https://newsignature.com/articles/card-sorting-techniques-pros-cons XML Summer School 2015 51
  52. 52. Card sorting Great for: • Simple, cheap and fun way to learn about how users group and label information in a specific domain • Providing insights into users’ mental models Tips: • Look for consistent groups with similar cards in them and how users have labelled their groups. XML Summer School 2015 52
  53. 53. GOV.UK childcare example We did a remote online card sort of content with 100 parents to see whether the initial groupings we came up with were consistent with the way parents think about them. We looked at how often any two cards were placed together (similarity matrix) and the 3 card sorts that had close similarity to the most sorts. We found that there were no strong groupings around financial help (consistent with the lack of knowledge around financial help that came out in the initial research). XML Summer School 2015 53
  54. 54. ACTIVITY (15 mins) – card sorting of recipes Get into teams and sort these recipe cards into groups that make sense to you. Then label the groups using the post-its. Present your findings to the rest of the group at the end. XML Summer School 2015 54
  55. 55. Tree testing What happens? Users are asked to find information in a simplified version of the site’s hierarchy. This tests how well information can be found in the structure. XML Summer School 2015 55
  56. 56. Tree testing Great for: • Measuring how well users find items in a defined hierarchy • Testing labels you’re not sure about Risks: • Tests how people look for information, not how they would classify it (that’s what card sorting does) XML Summer School 2015 56
  57. 57. GOV.UK childcare example We tree-tested the categories we came up with after the card sorting to check that they made sense and to work out where content should be duplicated in more than one category. XML Summer School 2015 57
  58. 58. Diary studies What happens? Participants are given a mechanism (e.g. diary or camera) to record and describe aspects of their lives that are relevant to a product or service, or simply core to the target audience. Analysing diaries kept by users reveals how mental models can change with time. XML Summer School 2015 58
  59. 59. Diary studies Great for: • Tracking ongoing relationships with your users over time Limitations: • Diary studies are typically longitudinal and can only be done for data that is easily recorded by participants XML Summer School 2015 59
  60. 60. Part 3: Challenges and extracting value XML Summer School 2015 60
  61. 61. Challenges • Budget • Planning • Doing • Analysis • Reporting XML Summer School 2015 61
  62. 62. Budget “We don’t have any time or money for research!” • It doesn’t have to be slow or expensive • Main costs = people’s time, recruiting and paying participants, equipment costs • ROI - helps reduce waste on things that don’t work or aren’t needed • Remember the costs of users not being able to find what they need… • In reality there’s always some form of user research you can do even on the smallest budget XML Summer School 2015 62
  63. 63. Planning Defining the right problems to solve • Quantitative techniques can help you start • Be clear about the objectives of your research Think about when you do your user research • As early as possible once you have clear goals • Match the right technique to the right project stage • Write a brief for each activity Think about how the data will be analysed (metrics) and allow plenty of time for the analysis phase XML Summer School 2015 63
  64. 64. Doing: recruiting your participants • You need a representative sample • Do the recruitment yourself or outsource it • Recruit as far in advance as possible • Users need incentives (money, vouchers, cake!) • Allow for ‘no shows’ How many moderators? • Good to have 2 people: 1 for note-taking • If you can take your team to observe the sessions that’s great XML Summer School 2015 64
  65. 65. Doing: on the day Consent and ethics • You’ll need to get participants’ permission to record and their consent to use the data you collect (best to only share this internally) • Allow the participant to opt-out at any time • Respect and listen to your participants Asking the right questions • Ask open ended questions that encourage participants to ‘think out loud’ • Instead of asking for preferences or opinions, try to observe what people do XML Summer School 2015 65
  66. 66. Analysis • The process than transforms your research data into deliverables that can make an impact • Don’t skimp on this stage • Go back to the goals you defined in your planning stage and how you were going to measure success • Don’t worry too much about statistical significance • Look for patterns and insights with post-its and affinity sorting – ideally as a team exercise • Be realistic about the confidence you can assign to your results – you can reduce risks but not remove them completely XML Summer School 2015 66
  67. 67. Reporting • User research is only as good as the impact it has, so it’s important to communicate your findings • Use quotations and videos as much as possible in your presentations (remembering to respect users’ anonymity) • Include subtitles in your video clips if you can • Include stories about what people actually said • Show photos if you have any • You could even use comic strips • Use wall space for your artifacts (GDS style) XML Summer School 2015 67
  68. 68. Wrap-up XML Summer School 2015 68
  69. 69. Summary • Talk to your users regularly about their needs • User research doesn’t always happen in a lab • Identify your target audience • Define the problem before trying to solve it • Don’t assume you are the same as your users • Use research to validate hypotheses • Design decisions should be based on evidence • Get all the team involved if you can • User research is ongoing • Best to test ideas early and often XML Summer School 2015 69
  70. 70. Resources Steve Krug’s books: - Don’t Make Me Think - Rocket Surgery Made Easy Online resources: https://userresearch.blog.gov.uk/ http://www.slideshare.net/GDSUserResearch http://www.gv.com/library/user-research XML Summer School 2015 70
  71. 71. Final thoughts What difference would user research make to the products you’re working on? Remember… • The costs of users not finding what they need or struggling to use a site can be high and… • Talking to users is usually fun and always interesting! XML Summer School 2015 71
  72. 72. Here’s something for you to try Friends and family ‘guerilla’ usability testing • A fast, easy, convenient technique • Show a site, a prototype, a sketch… • To: friends and family, colleagues (who don’t work on the project), people in cafes etc • Ask them about it and observe what they do • Get immediate feedback with minimal overhead • Develop a better understanding of which parts of your site need improving **CAVEAT: However, where possible you’d want to use actual representative of your audience (see http://www.gv.com/lib/is-it-a-good-idea-to-test-my-product-with-friends-and-family)** XML Summer School 2015 72
  73. 73. summer school xmlsummerschool.com Slide 73 Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 International License If you want to contact me here’s my email: vicky.buser@gmail.com @vickybuser Thank you!

×