A Bee's Life

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A Bee's Life

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A Bee's Life

  1. 1. A Bee’s Life so what’s the Buzz all about???
  2. 2. The Life Cycle of the Bee….1. The queen lays each egg in a different cell of the honeycomb.2. As soon as the egg is laid, the larva is growing inside it.3. After three days, the egg hatches and a larva crawls out.4. As the larva grows, it sheds its skin. It does this five times.5. Eight days after hatching, the bee larva is fully grown6. The larva cannot feed anymore and it starts to change into a pupa.7. After nine days, the pupa changes colour. It has turned into an adult.8. When its about three to four weeks old, the bee will leave the hive.
  3. 3. History of the Bee-KeeperBeekeeping started in 1878, whenthe Langstroth hive began to beused in New Zealand. The hive ismade up of stacks of boxes thatslide out like trays. In these trays,bees build their honeycombs and There were about 100,000 hives indeposit honey. New Zealand by the end of the 1920s. Beekeeping flourishedAfter the world wars a number of again after the Second World War,returned servicemen took up and in 1950 there were somebeekeeping and the industry thrived. 7,000 beekeepers with 150,000The demand for honey and other hives. By 1988 there were 335,000bee products has continued to grow. hives, partly due to the demand for pollination services, and alsoToday, hives are mostly run by large because of the market for acompanies rather than individuals. broader range of honey types and products.
  4. 4. Let’s go meet theQueen!T he queen bee is the mostimportant bee in the hive. She is thebee that births all other bees that livein the hive. She is nurtured to queenstatus by being fed a special diet. Thequeen has to battle other beesbefore she is the only reproducingfemale left in the hive. Queen beeslive a life like no other bee.
  5. 5. So Why are Bees so Important ??Bees are really, really important for the pollinationof all our fruits and berries and many of ourvegetables gardens. They don’t need us, but wecertainly need them. Worldwide their numbers areon the decline due to disease and other factors.
  6. 6. Can we survive without Bee’s?• No because they are good for the environment• No because they pollinate the flowers• No because we need honey• No because people make a living for them• No because we need medicine• No because they are good to learn about
  7. 7. The role of the Bee’s in the Colony There are about 20,000 different species of bees in the world. Bees live in colonies and there are three types of bees in each colony. There is the queen bee, the worker bee and the drone. The worker bee and the queen bee are both female, but only the queen bee can reproduce. All drones are male. Worker bees clean the hive, collecting pollen and nectar to feed the colony and they take care of the offspring. The drone’s only job is to mate with the queen. The queen’s only job is to lay eggs.
  8. 8. Why do Bee’s live in Colonies? A colony generally contains one breeding female, or “queen” a few thousand males, or “drones”; and a large population of sterile female “worker” bees. The population of a healthy hive in mid-summer can average between 40,000 and 80,000 bees. The workers cooperate to find food and use a pattern of “dancing” to communicate with each other.
  9. 9. A Bee’s dizzy day is never done! Don’t Worry BEE Happy…

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