Agility is all about driving value!<br />Vibhu Srinivasan vibhu@agilefaq.net<br /> “Its important to be agile not to do ag...
Agenda<br />Visiting the Agile Manifesto.<br />Product Owner Team.<br />Metascrum<br />User stories What are they .<br />Y...
Agile ManifeSTO<br />We are uncovering better ways of developing software by doing it and helping others do it. Through th...
Core Values/ Principles<br />Our highest priority is to satisfy the customerthrough early and continuous deliveryof valuab...
Exercise<br />Which of these values matter to you a lot?<br />
Approaches to development<br />Predictive approach<br />– Heavy-weight;<br />– Process-oriented;<br />– Plan-driven;<br />...
How often are features used<br />
Agility is all about delivering value<br />
Scrum – A tool to help you succeed<br />
Scrum Defined<br />Roles<br />– The Team<br />– ScrumMaster<br />– Product Owner<br />Artifacts<br />– Product Backlog<br ...
Principles of Lean<br />
Agenda<br />Visiting the Agile Manifesto.<br />Product Owner Team.<br />Metascrum<br />User stories What are they .<br />Y...
Product Owner Team AKA Product Definition Team<br />None of us is as smart as all of us – Ken Blachard<br />
Scaling ScSScaling rum – Issues <br />Scaling Agile Issues<br />Parallel teams <br />Multiple goals <br />Shared resources...
Product Owner – give me all the requirements now <br />
Product Definition Team<br />An agile team responsible for keeping your product backlog in good shape ( well groomed). <br...
P<br />Workflow <br />
Your PDT is now meeting many times a week <br />100 Percent Committed<br />ABC– Chief Product Owner  <br />XYZ– Area Produ...
A few changes !!<br />PDT will keep the various backlogs constantly groomed<br />They own the roadmap , but the teams dire...
Agenda<br />Visiting the Agile Manifesto.<br />Product Owner Team.<br />Metascrum<br />User stories What are they .<br />Y...
Metascrum- What another meeting!<br />
Metascrum Defined<br />Attended by key stakeholders, product definition team, scrum masters and architect and sometimes te...
Agenda<br />Visiting the Agile Manifesto.<br />Product Owner Team.<br />Metascrum<br />User stories.<br />Your role in you...
User story Defined<br />
User story	<br />A piece of functionality that is needed to add value to the product. A good story has well defined accept...
More on user stories<br />User stories bring in the notion of just in time requirements<br />You don’t need use cases. Sto...
Every story you take should pass the invest model test.<br />I – Independent<br />N – Negotiable<br />V – Valuable<br />E ...
User story -	what it does not have!<br />Technical specifications<br />All the details up front like in a use case or func...
What about technical stories ? The shiny bunny problem<br />Every sprint the team could buy certain story points to work o...
Product Backlog	<br />A collection of user stories, well prioritized by the product owner is a backlog<br />Please ask you...
“Customers have the right to demand working software but they should respect your estimates”<br />
Roadmap and release plan	<br />Teams should know what their roadmap is. Ask your product owner where the roadmap is?<br />...
Agenda<br />Visiting the Agile Manifesto.<br />Product Owner Team.<br />Metascrum<br />User stories.<br />Your role in you...
Your role is an agile team	<br />What you need is testing not tester. Developing not developer.<br />The shift from I – We...
Your role is an agile team	<br />What you need is testing not tester. Developing not developer.<br />The shift from I – We...
Agile team characteristics<br />Self organizing<br />Inspect adapt nature<br />Deliver Frequently<br />Communicate and lis...
Agenda<br />Visiting the Agile Manifesto.<br />Product Owner Team.<br />Metascrum<br />User stories.<br />Your role in you...
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Scaling Agile - Agility Defined

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This deck presents a talk i give on scaling agile in organizations.

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Scaling Agile - Agility Defined

  1. 1. Agility is all about driving value!<br />Vibhu Srinivasan vibhu@agilefaq.net<br /> “Its important to be agile not to do agile”<br />
  2. 2. Agenda<br />Visiting the Agile Manifesto.<br />Product Owner Team.<br />Metascrum<br />User stories What are they .<br />Your role on Agile team.<br />Planning and estimation.<br />Next Steps.<br />
  3. 3. Agile ManifeSTO<br />We are uncovering better ways of developing software by doing it and helping others do it. Through this work we have come to value: <br />Individuals and interactions over processes and tools Working software over comprehensive documentation Customer collaboration over contract negotiation Responding to change over following a plan <br />That is, while there is value in the items on the right, we value the items on the left more. <br />
  4. 4. Core Values/ Principles<br />Our highest priority is to satisfy the customerthrough early and continuous deliveryof valuable software. <br />Welcome changing requirements, even late in development. Agile processes harness change for the customer&apos;s competitive advantage. <br />Deliver working software frequently, from a couple of weeks to a couple of months, with a preference to the shorter timescale. <br />Business people and developers must work together daily throughout the project. <br />Build projects around motivated individuals. Give them the environment and support they need, and trust them to get the job done. <br />The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-to-face conversation. <br />Working software is the primary measure of progress. <br />Agile processes promote sustainable development. The sponsors, developers, and users should be able to maintain a constant pace indefinitely. <br />Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design enhances agility. <br />Simplicity--the art of maximizing the amount of work not done--is essential. <br />The best architectures, requirements, and designs emerge from self-organizing teams. <br />At regular intervals, the team reflects on how to become more effective, then tunes and adjusts its behavior accordingly. <br />Commitment<br />Focus<br />Openness<br />Respect<br />Courage<br />
  5. 5. Exercise<br />Which of these values matter to you a lot?<br />
  6. 6. Approaches to development<br />Predictive approach<br />– Heavy-weight;<br />– Process-oriented;<br />– Plan-driven;<br />– “Waterfall”.<br />Adaptive approach<br />– Light-weight;<br />– People-oriented;<br />– Value-driven;<br />– “Agile” and “Lean”<br />
  7. 7. How often are features used<br />
  8. 8. Agility is all about delivering value<br />
  9. 9. Scrum – A tool to help you succeed<br />
  10. 10. Scrum Defined<br />Roles<br />– The Team<br />– ScrumMaster<br />– Product Owner<br />Artifacts<br />– Product Backlog<br />– Sprint Backlog<br />– Sprint/Release BurndownChart<br />Meetings (ceremonies)<br />– Sprint Planning<br />– Daily Scrum (“Stand-Up”)<br />– Sprint Review (Demo)<br />– Retrospective<br />
  11. 11. Principles of Lean<br />
  12. 12. Agenda<br />Visiting the Agile Manifesto.<br />Product Owner Team.<br />Metascrum<br />User stories What are they .<br />Your role on Agile team.<br />Planning and estimation.<br />Next Steps.<br />
  13. 13. Product Owner Team AKA Product Definition Team<br />None of us is as smart as all of us – Ken Blachard<br />
  14. 14. Scaling ScSScaling rum – Issues <br />Scaling Agile Issues<br />Parallel teams <br />Multiple goals <br />Shared resources<br />Product owners are tasked with carrying the product backlog and be always prepared for all sprint planning meetings.<br />
  15. 15.
  16. 16. Product Owner – give me all the requirements now <br />
  17. 17. Product Definition Team<br />An agile team responsible for keeping your product backlog in good shape ( well groomed). <br />Sprint Ready<br />Story Sizes <br />
  18. 18. P<br />Workflow <br />
  19. 19. Your PDT is now meeting many times a week <br />100 Percent Committed<br />ABC– Chief Product Owner <br />XYZ– Area Product Owner<br />AGS– Area Product Owner<br />ADF– Area Product Owner <br />- Area Product Owner.<br />This group clearly are the product managers and own the backlog<br />Around 30 percent <br />Developers ,Testers, architects, UX etc.<br /> This group is primarily to help the backlog be more accurate. <br />
  20. 20. A few changes !!<br />PDT will keep the various backlogs constantly groomed<br />They own the roadmap , but the teams directly add a realistic view to the roadmap by doing release planning<br />Scrum masters need not have to schedule repeated grooming sessions. The PDT should be doing this.<br />As always this group will inspect and adapt. <br />
  21. 21. Agenda<br />Visiting the Agile Manifesto.<br />Product Owner Team.<br />Metascrum<br />User stories What are they .<br />Your role on Agile team.<br />Planning and estimation.<br />Next Steps.<br />
  22. 22. Metascrum- What another meeting!<br />
  23. 23. Metascrum Defined<br />Attended by key stakeholders, product definition team, scrum masters and architect and sometimes team members<br />This meeting has a strategic intent unlike the tactical intent of daily scrum. <br />In a Metascrum you discuss where all these features are in flight as compared to the overall roadmap for that group. <br />This is a place to resolve any impediments the teams have not been able to resolve on their own.<br />This group meets every two weeks now on a thursday<br />
  24. 24. Agenda<br />Visiting the Agile Manifesto.<br />Product Owner Team.<br />Metascrum<br />User stories.<br />Your role in your agile team.<br />Next Steps.<br />
  25. 25. User story Defined<br />
  26. 26. User story <br />A piece of functionality that is needed to add value to the product. A good story has well defined acceptance criteria.<br />The three C’s of a User Story<br />C = Card<br />C = Conversation<br />C = Confirmation<br />
  27. 27. More on user stories<br />User stories bring in the notion of just in time requirements<br />You don’t need use cases. Stories are enough if you have a good product owner.<br />Stories are only complete with acceptance criteria. <br />You can say “NO” to working on stories if the team does not get what the story means. <br />You should give input to the order the stories are built. You may know of dependencies that product owners don’t.<br />
  28. 28. Every story you take should pass the invest model test.<br />I – Independent<br />N – Negotiable<br />V – Valuable<br />E - Estimable<br />S - Small<br />T - Testable<br />
  29. 29. User story - what it does not have!<br />Technical specifications<br />All the details up front like in a use case or functional specification.<br />Database fields<br />Product owners should tell the “what” not the “how”<br />
  30. 30. What about technical stories ? The shiny bunny problem<br />Every sprint the team could buy certain story points to work on technical stories, like enhanced logging, implementing a MVC etc<br />Architects may have some points too for some of their larger initiatives. <br />But always show value in your stories – Write them as abusive stories, word them in a way a product owner will see value. <br />
  31. 31. Product Backlog <br />A collection of user stories, well prioritized by the product owner is a backlog<br />Please ask your product owner or your PDT about where your backlog is<br />Backlog never ends, the product owners can choose to ship at any point they see value.<br />
  32. 32. “Customers have the right to demand working software but they should respect your estimates”<br />
  33. 33. Roadmap and release plan <br />Teams should know what their roadmap is. Ask your product owner where the roadmap is?<br />You should know the product vision, the roadmap, when your next release plan is or where it is?<br />
  34. 34. Agenda<br />Visiting the Agile Manifesto.<br />Product Owner Team.<br />Metascrum<br />User stories.<br />Your role in your agile team.<br />Next Steps.<br />
  35. 35. Your role is an agile team <br />What you need is testing not tester. Developing not developer.<br />The shift from I – We – Us is very tough<br />Remember the art of active listening.<br />
  36. 36. Your role is an agile team <br />What you need is testing not tester. Developing not developer.<br />The shift from I – We – Us is very tough<br />Remember the art of active listening.<br />
  37. 37. Agile team characteristics<br />Self organizing<br />Inspect adapt nature<br />Deliver Frequently<br />Communicate and listen well <br />They believe in testing well.<br />They always can show value in work they do<br />They keep an eye on the baton not the runners.<br />
  38. 38. Agenda<br />Visiting the Agile Manifesto.<br />Product Owner Team.<br />Metascrum<br />User stories.<br />Your role in your agile team.<br />Next Steps.<br />

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