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Cancer: What's your risk?

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Maggie Ward, with the Via Christi Cancer Outreach and Risk Assessment program, discussed cancer genetic testing at the October, 2015, Women's Connection luncheon.

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Cancer: What's your risk?

  1. 1. What’s your risk? The ins and outs of cancer genetic testing. Maggie Ward Coordinator – CORA
  2. 2. 2 What is genetic testing? Identification  Presence of a genetic mutation  Does not mean cancer is present  Increased risk for cancer  Lack of genetic mutation  Mutation no longer present  Does not mean you will never get cancer  Not yet identified
  3. 3. 3 What is genetic testing? Ever-changing  Single-site v. Panel testing  BRCA 1/2  Lynch Syndrome  How is it done?  Blood  Saliva
  4. 4. 4 Not for everyone 1.Specific qualifying criteria a. Personal and family history b. Insurance coverage 2. Understanding of what to expect a. Genetic counseling b. Willingness for future testing c. Preparation for the unexpected
  5. 5. 5 Indications 1.Ovarian Cancer 2.Breast cancer in two individuals on same side of family 3.Breast, colon or endometrial cancer diagnosis under the age of 50. 4.Male breast cancer or triple-negative breast cancer diagnosis 5.Combination of three cancers in the same side of family
  6. 6. Considerations Decision is not cut and dry  May or may not tell us:  Personal cancer risk  Family or future off- spring cancer risk  Inability to screen or prevent  No family history is the same 6
  7. 7. Case Study #1 34-year old female, no personal history of cancer  Brother – sarcoma  Mother – ovarian  Aunt – breast  Cousin – pancreatic 7
  8. 8. Case study #2 Male, 54-years old, no personal history of cancer  Father – colon cancer at 48, deceased at 51  Brother – colon cancer at 50, deceased at 60  Mother – breast cancer at 70, alive & well at 82  Grandmother – breast cancer at 83, deceased at 90 8
  9. 9. Case study #3 31-year old female, diagnosed with breast cancer  No known family history of cancer  Denovo? 9
  10. 10. 10 Potential results Positive:  Genetic mutation present  Increased risk for other cancers  Future generations  Consideration for additional screening and/or prevention services Negative:  If known mutation in the family, was not passed on  May not yet be identified  Familial v. Hereditary  Screening & prevention based on family history
  11. 11. Potential results VUS - Variant of Uncertain Significance  Often benign  May be reclassified  Screening/prevention based on family history  Family testing  Family members affected by cancer  Offspring 11
  12. 12. What to expect Detailed pedigree Consultation Specimen collection 12
  13. 13. 13 Next steps 1.Know your family history a. Three generations b. Type of cancer & age diagnosed, when possible 2. Consider your risk 3. Talk to your physician
  14. 14. 14 QUESTIONS? Via Christi CORA Cancer Outreach & Risk Assessment Program 316.689.5700 OncologyNavigators@viachristi.org

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