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Computer Science.pptx

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Adobe photoshop cs6
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Computer Science.pptx

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Basic Concepts in Photo Editing
•Create and save new documents files in Adobe Photoshop
•Manipulate layers in Adobe Photoshop

Basic Concepts in Photo Editing
•Create and save new documents files in Adobe Photoshop
•Manipulate layers in Adobe Photoshop

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Computer Science.pptx

  1. 1. Computer Science 2
  2. 2. Basic Concepts in Photo Editing •Create and save new documents files in Adobe Photoshop •Manipulate layers in Adobe Photoshop
  3. 3. Create and save new documents files in Adobe Photoshop ❖ Execute Opening, Viewing and Saving of Files by ⮚ Creating a new document ⮚ Saving files ⮚ Opening Existing Documents ⮚ Changing Views ⮚ Arranging open images ⮚ Guides, Grids and Rulers
  4. 4. Manipulate layers in Adobe Photoshop ❖ Create and use the following types of Layers ⮚ Layers Basic ⮚ Managing Layers ⮚ Layer Blending ⮚ Layer Mask ⮚ Using Smart Objects ⮚ Layer Styles
  5. 5. Lesson 1 Overview of Adobe Photoshop Adobe Photoshop is a seriously powerful photo and image editing application. Let us have a quick look at what Photoshop is, and what it is not. Remember that Photoshop is not a drawing program.
  6. 6. Launching the Photoshop Application 1. Click the start button on the Windows taskbar. Point to All Programs on the start menu. Point to Adobe and then click Adobe Photoshop. 2. Once you have opened the application (after a few moments of loading time), the Photoshop interface will appear as shown.
  7. 7. ⮚ Tool Bar – Provides access to a variety of tools with multiple image-editing functions. •These tools typically fall under the categories of drawing; painting; measuring and navigation; selection; typing; and retouching. •Some tools contain a small triangle in the bottom right corner of the tool icon; these tools can be expanded to reveal similar tools.
  8. 8. ⮚Options Bar – Works in coordination with your tool bar to provide additional settings for the tool you’re currently using. •The options bar changes according to whichever tool you are using.
  9. 9. ⮚Menu Bar – Contains menus for performing common tasks •Consists of eleven menu options: File; Edit; Image; Layer; Type; Select; Filter; 3D; View; Window; Help •Menu items containing an ellipsis indicate that a dialogue box will follow that option. •Menu items with an arrow indicate a submenu for that particular option.
  10. 10. ⮚Panels/Palettes - Helps you monitor and modify your work •Provides groups of functionalities specific to certain tools or tasks. •You can create a custom workspace by moving and manipulating panels.
  11. 11. Opening a Photoshop Document To open or create a new document in Photoshop, follow these steps: 1. Click “File” on the menu bar, and then select “New”.
  12. 12. Opening a Photoshop Document To open or create a new document in Photoshop, follow these steps: 2. You will see a New dialog box like this. 3. Use the New dialog box to create a new, blank document. Then, select the attributes for the new file. 4. Type a name for your new document and select a preset size from a drop-down list. Then set the resolution and background of your new Photoshop document. You can choose a colored, white, or transparent background.
  13. 13. Opening a Photoshop Document To open or create a new document in Photoshop, follow these steps: 5.The resolution which tells how much information is contained in your image, how clear it is, how big the file is and what it looks like in the format you want to output it in. Do not get confused. As a beginner, just use the default resolution of 72. The recommended setting is: Web Resolution = 72dpi Print resolution = 150 or 300dpi Film Resolution = 600dpi
  14. 14. Saving a Photoshop Document To save your file after working on your new Photoshop document, follow the steps: 1. Click the file menu. 2. Click Save as. 3. Choose the file format (e.g., in PSD) you wish to save the file.
  15. 15. Changing Views You can use the screen mode options to view images on your entire screen. You can show or hide the menu bar, title bar, and scroll bars.
  16. 16. Changing Views Do one of the following: 1. To display the default mode (menu bar at the top and scroll bars on the side), choose View > Screen Mode > Standard Screen Mode. Or click the Screen Mode button in the Application bar and select Standard Screen Mode from the pop-up menu.
  17. 17. Changing Views Do one of the following: 2. To display a full-screen window with a menu bar and a 50% gray background, but no title bar or scroll bars, choose View > Screen Mode > Full Screen Mode With Menu Bar. Or click the Screen Mode button in the Application bar and select Full Screen Mode With Menu Bar from the pop-up menu.
  18. 18. Changing Views Do one of the following: 3. To display a full-screen window with only a black background (no title bar, menu bar, or scroll bars), choose View > Screen Mode > Full Screen Mode. Or, click the Screen Mode button in the Application bar, and select Full Screen Mode from the pop-up menu. Note: Press the F key to quickly cycle through screen modes.
  19. 19. Arranging open images The Application Frame and tabbed- document workspace help you manage several open documents; if you turn off the Application Frame, your documents can get scattered across your screen. However, you can herd open windows together by using the commands listed under Window → Arrange.
  20. 20. Arranging open images Use the Window →Arrange commands to create order out of chaos by tiling (top) or cascading (bottom) your windows. (You can’t cascade tabbed documents because they’re attached— or rather, docked—to the top of the Photoshop window.
  21. 21. Arranging open images The fix is to choose Window →Arrange →“Float All in Windows” first, and then choose Cascade.) When the Application bar was removed back in CS6, the Arrange Documents menu disappeared along with it; however, Adobe moved its commands to the Window →Arrange submenu.
  22. 22. Arranging open images Documents scattered across the screen
  23. 23. Arranging open images Cascade View
  24. 24. Arranging open images Tile View
  25. 25. Guides, Grids and Rulers To change the rulers’ zero origin, position the pointer over the intersection of the rulers in the upper-left corner of the window, and drag diagonally down onto the image. A set of cross hairs appears, marking the new origin on the rulers. The new zero origin will be set where you release the mouse button.
  26. 26. Guides, Grids and Rulers Change the guides and grid settings 1. Choose Edit > Preferences > Guides & Grid. 2. Under the Guides or Grids area: • Choose a preset color or click the color swatch to choose a custom color.
  27. 27. Guides, Grids and Rulers Change the guides and grid settings • Choose the line style for the grid. Choose Lines for solid lines, or choose Dashed lines or Dots for broken lines. 3. For Gridline Every, enter a number value, and then choose the unit of measurement to define the spacing of major grid lines. 4. For Subdivisions, enter a number value to define the frequency of minor grid lines, and click OK.
  28. 28. Lesson 2 Manipulate layers in Adobe Photoshop Layers Basic Photoshop documents are composed of layers, which can basically be described as single transparent sheets which hold particular pieces of an image. These layers can contain images, text and vector graphics. They can be rearranged and grouped according to user needs. Layers are controlled with the use of the Layers pane.
  29. 29. Layer pane
  30. 30. Layers Pane The layers pane is one of the panes that is best to keep visible at all times. If you do not see it when you open Photoshop, go to window> show layers and it will be restored.
  31. 31. Adding New Layers You can think of the layers as clear pages overlaying each other. The layers pane provides a good visualization of this concept because the layers appear in the layers pane as they are organized in the document. To demonstrate this, add a new layer and type a little on it.
  32. 32. Adding New Layers ⮚Go to Layer> and Select New Layer. Type a name for the layer in the dialog box that appears and click enter. ⮚It should now appear in the layers pane (but since it is currently empty, there will be no sign of it in the image). ⮚Select the text tool from the tool bar, click and drag somewhere on the image (making sure the new layer is still highlighted in blue).
  33. 33. Selecting Layers 1. Select the Type tool and type a title or Filename. On the top text layer, click the eye icon. 2. Click on the paintbrush next to it. 3. Click on the name of the layer below. 4. You see that the paintbrush now shows on the new active layer. 5. Click on the empty paintbrush box to lock and unlock layers to avoid unwanted changes. 6. The squiggle means it is locked.
  34. 34. Arranging Layers Arranging layers can be done manually. To do it, follow these steps. 1. Click and drag your text layer underneath the original image layer. You will see that the text no longer appears. That is because it is now located behind the opaque image layer. However, there is a quicker and easier way. 2. Just click on the do geared page icon at the bottom of the layers pane. 3. You can double click on this layer's name to change it. 4. If you want to delete a layer, you can either drag it to the trash icon at the bottom of the layers pane or select the layer and click the trash icon.
  35. 35. Merging Layers Sometimes you want to combine the contents of two layers onto one layer. To do it, follow the following steps: 1. Select the layer you want to be on top of the new merged layer, make sure the other layer you would like to merge is directly beneath it, and select Merge Down from the Layer menu. 2. The two layers are now one. If you want to merge down an entire file of layers, select "Flatten image" from the layers menu and then all layers will be squashed into one.
  36. 36. Merging Layers Sometimes you want to combine the contents of two layers onto one layer. To do it, follow the following steps: 3. When you merge or flatten layers that contain text layers, you will be asked whether you would like to rasterize that text (that is, convert it to an image and lose the ability to edit it). It is a good idea to copy any layer and hide them before you rasterize and merge. 4. It saves you the work of completely recreating layers if you decide to change text.
  37. 37. Layer Mask Layer masking is a reversible way to hide part of a layer. This gives you more editing flexibility than permanently erasing or deleting part of a layer. Layer masking is useful for making image composites, cutting out objects for use in other documents, and limiting edits to part of a layer. You can add black, white, or gray color to a layer mask. One way to do that is by painting on the layer mask. Black on a layer mask hides the layer that contains the mask, so you can see what is underneath that layer. Gray on a layer mask partially hides the layer that contains the mask. White on a layer mask shows the layer that contains the mask.
  38. 38. Create a layer mask Add a layer mask 1. Start with a document that has at least two images, each on a separate layer. Select the top image layer in the Layers panel. 2. Click the Add layer mask button in the Layers panel. This adds a white layer mask to the selected layer. You can still see everything on the layer with the mask, because the mask is white.
  39. 39. Create a layer mask Paint on the layer mask with black, white, and gray 1. In the Layers panel, make sure there is a white border around the layer mask thumbnail. If there is not a white border, click the layer mask thumbnail. 2. Select the Brush tool in the Toolbar. In the Options bar, open the Brush Picker to set brush size and hardness. Drag the Hardness slider toward the left to create a soft brush tip.
  40. 40. Create a layer mask Paint on the layer mask with black, white, and gray 3. Press D and then press X on the keyboard to set the foreground color to black and the background color to white. 4. Paint over the image in the document window to add black to part of the layer mask. The black hides the corresponding part of the layer that contains the mask, so the image on the layer underneath shows through. Soft edges of the brush apply gray to the layer mask, creating a gradual transition between the layered images.
  41. 41. Create a layer mask Paint on the layer mask with black, white, and gray 5. If you hide more of a layer than you intended to, press X on the keyboard to switch the foreground color to white. Then paint over hidden areas of the layer that contains the mask. This adds white to the mask, bringing those areas back into view.
  42. 42. Create a layer mask Tip: A quick way to change brush size as you paint is to press the right bracket key on the keyboard to increase brush size or press the left bracket key to decrease brush size. Tip: Reducing the brush Flow value in the Options bar allows you to build up shades of gray as you paint with black on a layer mask. Shades of gray on a layer mask partially hide the layer that contains the mask. Save your work with layers Save the image in .PSD or .TIFF format to retain layers and layer masks for future editing.
  43. 43. Understand Smart Objects In Photoshop, you can embed the contents of an image into a Photoshop document. In Photoshop, you can also create Linked Smart Objects whose contents are referenced from external image files. The contents of a Linked Smart Object are updated when its source image file changes. Linked Smart Objects are distinct from duplicated instances of a Smart Object within a Photoshop document. With Linked Smart Objects, you can use a shared source file across multiple Photoshop documents which is a familiar and welcome concept for web designers.
  44. 44. With Smart Objects, you can: 1. Perform nondestructive transforms. You can scale, rotate, skew, distort, perspective transform, or warp a layer without losing original image data or quality because the transforms don't affect the original data. 2. Work with vector data, such as vector artwork from Illustrator, that otherwise would be rasterized in Photoshop. 3. Perform nondestructive filtering. You can edit filters applied to Smart Objects at any time. 4. Edit one Smart Object and automatically update all its linked instances. 5. Apply a layer mask that's either linked or unlinked to the Smart Object layer. 6. Try various designs with low-resolution placeholder images that you later replace with final versions.
  45. 45. Computer Science 2 Thank You…

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