LITERATE ENVIRONMENT        ANALYSIS        B Y: V I C TO R I A F E I L       WA L D E N U N I V E R S I TYEDUC 6706: THE ...
WHAT IS A LITERATE ENVIRONMENT? • A classroom that emphasizes the   importance of reading, writing and   speaking. • A wel...
GETTING TO KNOW LITERACY LEARNERSTO CREATE A LITERATE ENVIRONMENT    • Take time to talk to your students. Get to know the...
GETTING TO KNOW LITERACY LEARNERS• Reading assessments help teachers to understand their developing  students and provides...
GETTING TO KNOW LITERACY LEARNERS           (CONTINUED)• Successful readers not only need skills and strategies, they need...
GETTING TO KNOW LITERACY LEARNERS           (CONTINUED)           With each child being unique in their learning, I       ...
SELECTING TEXTS• Selecting text for students has become an important part of a teacher’s  role in guiding their students t...
SELECTING TEXT (CONTINUED)                      The Literacy Matrix                            Linguistic (with words)    ...
SELECTING TEXT (CONTINUED)Following the cognitive and non-cognitiveassessments, texts were chosen according to thedata gat...
LITERACY LESSON:INTERACTIVE PERSPECTIVE   • Dr. Janice Almasi explains that the     interactive perspective of literacy   ...
LITERACY LESSON:INTERACTIVE PERSPECTIVE (CONTINUED)By providing appropriate informational texts of interests to my student...
LITERACY LESSON: CRITICAL AND       RESPONSIVE PERSPECTIVES• Dr. Almasi explains the critical perspective of learning as t...
LITERACY LESSON: CRITICAL AND  RESPONSIVE PERSPECTIVE (CONTINUED)• Continuing with texts on animals, I enjoyed a lesson on...
LITERACY LESSON: CRITICAL AND   RESPONSIVE PERSPECTIVE (CONTINUED)• At the conclusion of the lesson on sharks, the student...
FEEDBACK FROM COLLEAGUES AND    FAMILY MEMBERS OF STUDENTS• What insights did you gain about literacy and literacy instruc...
REFERENCESAfflerbach, P. (2007). Understanding and using reading assessment, k-12. Newark, DE: International Reading Assoc...
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Literate Environment Analysis Presentation by Victoria Feil

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Literate Environment Analysis Presentation by Victoria Feil

  1. 1. LITERATE ENVIRONMENT ANALYSIS B Y: V I C TO R I A F E I L WA L D E N U N I V E R S I TYEDUC 6706: THE BEGINNING READER, P R E K- 3 INSTRUCTOR: DR. DENISE LOVE
  2. 2. WHAT IS A LITERATE ENVIRONMENT? • A classroom that emphasizes the importance of reading, writing and speaking. • A well organized classroom with a plan of activities, materials and schedule that will enrich each student on a personal level. • A classroom with a teacher that promotes literacy with the students’ interests at heart (Laureate Education, Inc., 2009b).
  3. 3. GETTING TO KNOW LITERACY LEARNERSTO CREATE A LITERATE ENVIRONMENT • Take time to talk to your students. Get to know their cultural backgrounds, worldly experiences, interests and motivations. • Dr. Dorothy Strickland states that learning what matters to our students and how they feel will help teachers to see each child as an individual (Laureate Education, Inc., 2009e).
  4. 4. GETTING TO KNOW LITERACY LEARNERS• Reading assessments help teachers to understand their developing students and provides important information to help make critical instructional decisions ( Afflerbach, 2007).• Cognitive assessments measure student growth and ability in literacy. Examples of Cognitive Assessments Developmental Reading Assessment (DRA) The Texas Primary Reading Inventory (TPRI) Work Samples Reading Inventories
  5. 5. GETTING TO KNOW LITERACY LEARNERS (CONTINUED)• Successful readers not only need skills and strategies, they need a positive attitude, good self-image and motivation (Afflerbach, 2007).• To get insights on student attitudes and motivation toward reading, non-cognitive assessments are useful. Examples of Non-cognitive Assessments Elementary Reading Attitude Survey (ERAS) Individual Interviews Observations in Educational and Recreational Settings Motivation to Read Profile ( Gambrell, Palmer, Codling & Mazzoni, 1996)
  6. 6. GETTING TO KNOW LITERACY LEARNERS (CONTINUED) With each child being unique in their learning, I performed assessments on a small group of three different levels of readers to learn about their interest in reading. • The Elementary Reading Attitude Survey (McKenna & Kear, 1990), to the emergent and beginning readers. • The Motivation to Read Profile ( Gambrell, Palmer, Codling & Mazzoni, 1996), to the transitional reader. • The cognitive assessment; Texas Primary Reading Inventory (TPRI), gave me information on the skills needed to be incorporated into the lesson such as comprehension and word attack skills. These assessments helped me design lessons with a common interest of all three students.
  7. 7. SELECTING TEXTS• Selecting text for students has become an important part of a teacher’s role in guiding their students to an enriched and successful literacy experience.• Dr. Lesley Morrow states that the reading ability of an eleventh grade student can be predicted when he or she is in the first grade (Laureate Education, Inc., 2009d).• Texts can be analyzed using the Literacy Matrix (Laureate Education, Inc., 2009a), which is a tool that measures the dimension of difficulty in books.
  8. 8. SELECTING TEXT (CONTINUED) The Literacy Matrix Linguistic (with words) THE Hard Ex. Informational/Linguistic HOBBIT Narrative Informational Easy Semiotic (with pictures)When placing a text in the matrix, there are things to consider: • Readability, • Text Length, • Text Structure, • Size of Print.
  9. 9. SELECTING TEXT (CONTINUED)Following the cognitive and non-cognitiveassessments, texts were chosen according to thedata gathered.• Different reading levels with different skills to be addressed.• A common interest in animals .• Variety of texts to include: narratives, informational books and Dogs magazines, and online texts to expose the students to new technological literacies that are becoming available in the 21st century (Tompkins, 2010).The students enjoyed the texts and were motivatedto use different skills and strategies for decodingwords which improved their comprehension followingadditional readings of their texts.
  10. 10. LITERACY LESSON:INTERACTIVE PERSPECTIVE • Dr. Janice Almasi explains that the interactive perspective of literacy learning is teaching children how to be strategic processors and thinkers of all types of texts (Laureate Education, Inc., 2009f). • Designing lessons that teach strategies and skills to be reflective and self- regulating, must also be enjoyable by the student. Enjoyment fosters motivation and that is necessary in developing good readers (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010).
  11. 11. LITERACY LESSON:INTERACTIVE PERSPECTIVE (CONTINUED)By providing appropriate informational texts of interests to my students, Idesigned a lesson to address the needs of word recognition andcomprehension. The emergent and beginning reader:• Worked together to find unfamiliar words in their books and write them on white boards.• Used previously learned strategies of looking at pictures and word attack skills to decode the new words they found.• Discussed the meaning of each word• Added them to our classroom word wall, increased their vocabulary (Tompkins, 2010).• Wrote and illustrated three sentences telling new facts about the animals in their books.
  12. 12. LITERACY LESSON: CRITICAL AND RESPONSIVE PERSPECTIVES• Dr. Almasi explains the critical perspective of learning as teaching children how to examine text. The responsive perspective is the personal and emotional reaction a reader gets from a text and the way the reader expresses those feelings (Laureate Education, Inc., 2009e).• Students should learn how to look at text in different ways, not just read and report facts. Teachers need to teach students how to connect and feel what is written and why it was written a certain way.
  13. 13. LITERACY LESSON: CRITICAL AND RESPONSIVE PERSPECTIVE (CONTINUED)• Continuing with texts on animals, I enjoyed a lesson on sharks with my small group of students. We used a KWL chart to list the prior knowledge we all had on sharks, then the students made a list of what they wanted to learn about sharks. We also talked about personal experiences we have had seeing sharks.• Following the reading of each text, the students discussed the similarities and differences in information contained in their books on the same subject. Each student chose new information to share with other students in the class. They wrote some facts on cards and moved around the room discussing sharks.• The transitional reader became interested in a comment she read in her book that was brief and not fully explained. She wondered why the author did not expand on the statement. This showed evidence of her new critical approach to reading (Laureate Education, Inc., 2009c).
  14. 14. LITERACY LESSON: CRITICAL AND RESPONSIVE PERSPECTIVE (CONTINUED)• At the conclusion of the lesson on sharks, the students responded by filling out the KWL chart on the new information they learned about sharks.• Other ways the students could have responded to the informational text is to write and draw in their journals about sharks. A creative project of making a shark would be perfect for the artistic student. A poster with new knowledge or a three dimensional diorama illustrating an interesting fact about sharks would all be fun way for students to respond to the information learned in the texts they read.• Dr. Louise Rosenblatt stated that readers should be transformed by the texts they encounter (Laureate Education, Inc., 2009g). Like clay balls bumping into each other leaving a mark, teachers must teach and encourage students to read aesthetically so the text they read will leave a mark on them forever.
  15. 15. FEEDBACK FROM COLLEAGUES AND FAMILY MEMBERS OF STUDENTS• What insights did you gain about literacy and literacy instruction from viewing this presentation?• How might the information presented change your literacy practices and/or your literacy interactions with students?• In what ways can I support you in the literacy development of your students or children? How might you support me in my work with students or your children?• What questions do you have?
  16. 16. REFERENCESAfflerbach, P. (2007). Understanding and using reading assessment, k-12. Newark, DE: International Reading Association.Beaver, J. (2006). Developmental reading assessment (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Celebration Press/Pearson.Gambrell, L. B., Palmer, B. M., Codling, R. M., & Mazzoni, S. A. (1996). Assessing motivation to read. The Reading Teacher, 49(7), 518–533.Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2009a). Analyzing and selecting text. [DVD]. The Beginning Reader, PreK-3.Baltimore, MD.Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2009b). Changes in literacy education. [DVD]. The Beginning Reader, PreK-3.Baltimore, MD.Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2009c). Critical perspective. [DVD]. The Beginning Reader, PreK-3. Baltimore, MD.Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2009d). Informational text in the early years. [DVD]. The Beginning Reader, PreK-3. Baltimore, MD.Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010). Motivation. [DVD]. Foundations of Reading and Literacy. Baltimore, MD.Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2009e). Perspectives on early literacy. [DVD]. The Beginning Reader, PreK-3.Baltimore, MD.Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2009f). Perspectives on literacy learning. [DVD]. The Beginning Reader, PreK-3.Baltimore, MD.Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2009g). Responsive Perspective. [DVD]. The Beginning Reader, PreK-3. Baltimore, MD.McKenna, M. C., & Kear, D. J. (1990). Measuring attitude toward reading: A new tool for teachers. The Reading Teacher, 43(9), 626–639.

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