Open-First Social Media Monitoring

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Open-First Social Media Monitoring

  1. 1. MONITORING
SOCIAL
MEDIA
 
SEMINARIO
BIC
LA
FUCINA,

MILANO.

SATURDAY,

FEBRUARY
6,
2010

  2. 2. INTRODUCING…
 Open‐First:
 • A
consultancy
dedicated
to
the
art,
 
 science
and
application
of
social
 technologies

 • Operating
globally,
ofLices
in
London,
San
Francisco
and
Helsinki
 
 • Practice
areas
in
strategy,
research,
communications,
technology
 
 and
process
 • Website:
http://open‐Lirst.com
 

  3. 3. WHAT
IS
SOCIAL
MEDIA
MONITORING?
 • Social
media
networks
 • The
impact
of
 contain
info
about
the
 messages
shared
 personalities,
 inside
these
walls
is
 “Across
 the
 Internet
 customers
 are
 preferences
and
 not
isolated
to
online
 points
of
view
of
 social
networking
 talking,
 whether
 you
 like
 it
 or
 members.

 communities.
 not.
But
this
 shi2
 in
the
balance
 Social
Media
is
 Social
Media
is
 not
a
closed
 of
 power
 doesn't
 have
 to
 be
 transparent
 system
 your
worst
nightmare.”
 • Forums
and
opinion
 • What’s
important?
 “Take
control,
and
social
media
can
 sites,
video
sharing,
 What
ideas
are
 gaining
ground?
Who/ photo
sharing,
 h e l p
 y o u
 i m p r o v e
 y o u r
 microblogging.
 What
is
having
the
 biggest
impact
on
 products,
 marke8ng,
 sales
and
 your
client’s
brand?
 service."
 Social
Media
is
 Social
Media
is
 more
than
blogs
 measurable

  4. 4. THE
PROBLEM
WITH
SOCIAL
MEDIA
RESEARCH…
 Data
and
analy8cs
are
frequently
subpar:
 • Data
aggregation
often
treated
as
an
end
in
itself
 
 • Oversold
automation
/
turnkey
solutions
for
 
 monitoring
lead
to
substandard
or
incomplete
data
 “Typical
approach”
to
social
media
analy8cs
is:

 • Tactical,
not
strategic…
lacks
appropriate
context
 
 • Conceived
and
executed
at
junior
level…
ignored



 
 at
executive
level

  5. 5. OUR
APPROACH
TO
SOCIAL
MEDIA
RESEARCH
 
 • Demonstrating
the
strategic
value
created
by
 social
media
monitoring
and
analytics
 • Carrying
the
Llag
for
a
mature
approach
to
 
 social
media
research,
that
can
talk
credibly
to
 execu8ves

 • Showcasing
the
importance
of
research
exper8se
during
 
 program
design,
especially
in
determining
appropriate
mix
of
 qualitative
and
quantitative
research
methods
 • Demonstrating
a
methodology
for
evaluating,
selecting
and
 
 effectively
using
SM
monitoring
and
analytics
tools

  6. 6. TOOL
SELECTION
 Choice
criteria:
 • Fully
supports
project
objectives
 
 We
use:

 • Works
transparently
 
 • Offers
robust,
differentiated
analysis
 
 tools
 • Creates
unique
value
over
free

 
 Common
problems:
 • InsufLicient
archive
 
 • Unreliable
search
results
 
 • Lightweight,
or
minimal
 
 (and
our
own
manpower)
 differentiation
in
analytical
tools
 • Little
granularity
in
data
 

  7. 7. SOCIAL
MEDIA
MONITORING
TOOLS
 Small
to
mid‐sized
businesses
and
brands:
eCairn
   Specializes
in
the
blogosphere.
Maps
out
blog
communities.


   Users
manually
create
a
list
of
blogs
they
wish
to
track.

   A
proprietary
algorithm
ranks
blogs
by
“inLluence,”
largely
by
 measuring
how
frequently
the
blogs
cross
reference
other
inLluential
 blogs.
   Topical
targeting:
To
help
you
research
who
has
been
talking
about
 you,
your
competitors
or
your
favorite
topics
within
the
scope
of
your
 projects
communities.
   Community
mapping:
To
visualize
how
the
various
bloggers
in
your
 community
network
with
each
other,
and
group
them
according
to
your
 preferences.
 •  
Demo:
http://ecairn.com/media/Demo_Conversation.swf



  8. 8. SOCIAL
MEDIA
MONITORING
TOOLS
 Medium
to
large
sized
brands
and
businesses:
Scout
Labs
   Automated
sentiment
analysis:
natural
language
processing
 techniques
to
assess
the
sentiment
and
tone
of
your
searches
in
each
 post.


   Conversation
digest:
summary
of
the
most
buzz‐worthy
stories.
   Separates
results
out
by
medium,
giving
you
separate
tabs
for
blogs,
 news,
forums,
photos,
videos
and
Twitter.
   A
proprietary
algorithm
ranks
posts
by
”importance,”
by
measuring
 relevance
of
posts,
trafLic
and
links
of
sources,
and
post
“energy”.
   Advanced
collaboration
tools:
tags,
alerts,
bookmarks,
notes,
tasks.
   Tour:
http://www.scoutlabs.com/tour/





  9. 9. CASE
STUDY
1:
THE
HTC
G1,
AKA
THE
“GOOGLEPHONE”
 HTC
is…
 
 • The
manufacturer
which
makes…
 The
“G1”
 
 • The
first
smartphone
to
operate
on…
 Google’s
“Android”
mobile
opera8ng
system
 
 • An
early
contender
–
with
Symbian
–
in
the
“open
source
mobile”
space.
 EssenBally
an
open
code
base
for
developers
of
mobile
apps,
supported
by
 an
alliance
of
smartphone
manufacturers,
network
carriers
and
developers
 called…
 The
Open
Handset
Alliance
(OHA)
 
 • Which
has
around
50
members
as
of
today,
and
expects
to
have
launched
 18
Android
devices
by
end
2009

  10. 10. PROJECT
BRIEF
AND
PROGRAM
DESIGN
 Project
concept
 A
strategic
analysis
of
the
performance
at
launch
of
the
 T‐Mobile
/
HTC
G1
handset.
Viewed
from
the
 perspecBve
of
all
major
stakeholders
 Content
scope
 Social
media
content
–
blogs,
microblogs,
discussion
 forums
–
relevant
in
a
broad,
compeBBve
context
to
 the
handset
launch
 Geographic
Scope

 Global,
in
the
English
language

 Time
span

 Historical
analysis
encompassing
a
three
month
period
 around
launch
(Autumn
2008)
 Resources
 6
weeks
of
full‐Bme
resources
in
program
design,
 research
and
reporBng.
SoWware
license
costs
as
 required
(in
consideraBon
of
cost‐benefit
analysis)




  11. 11. WHAT
WE
FOUND…
 Summary:

 • Viewed
in
isolaBon,
the
G1
 
 built
impressive
buzz
around
its
 launch.

 • Looked
at
in
a
broader
 
 compeBBve
context,
results
are
 very
disappoin8ng
–
 parBcularly
for
a
handset
held
 iPhone
dominates,
even
during
G1
launch
 up
as
an
“iPhone
killer”

 • iPhone
commanded
more
than
12
Bmes
the
 
 raw
volume
of
new
blog
comment
during
the
3
 month
study
period

  12. 12. WHAT
WE
FOUND…
 Summary:

 • More
evidence
that
launch
 
 buzz
was
a
profound
 disappointment
–
peak
 discussion
was
substanBally
 overhauled
by
a
trade
press
 story!
 • A
significant
downwards
dip
in
 
 G1
launch
=
“tech
story
of
the
year”?

 discussion
towards
the
end
of
 the
launch
period
is
held
up
by
 • A
longer
term
view
of
blog
buzz
shows
that
 
 rumors
about
the
G2

 the
launch
was
anything
but:
discussion
 actually
peaked
in
relaBon
to
a
rouBne
OHA
 news
story,
several
weeks
aWer
launch

  13. 13. WHAT
WE
FOUND…
 Summary:

 • The
G1
is
a
complex
product
to
 
 communicate
–
with
much
of
 the
anBcipatory
buzz
built
 around
the
Android
operaBng
 system,
not
the
handset
on
 which
it
operates
 • The
posiBve
appeal
of
and
 
 residual
goodwill
towards
the
 Thumbs
up
to
Android;
Thumbs
down
to
G1
 Android
OS
is
not
successfully
 • Commentators
found
a
lot
to
like,
but
also
a
lot
 
 leveraged
in
G1
communicaBon
 to
dislike
about
the
G1
handset
features
 • But
there
was
nothing
but
praise
for
the
 
 Android
OS



  14. 14. WHAT
WE
FOUND…
 Summary:

 • Measuring
raw
buzz
makes
the
 
 compeBBve
posiBon
of
the
G1
 look
weak,
but
weighing
this
for
 reach
or
influence
makes
it
look
 sBll
worse
 • ParBcipants
in
discussions
tend
 
 to
be
either
Android
OS
fans,
or
 G1
handset
haters.
The
 G1
has
weak
friends
and
powerful
enemies
 “complete
package”
needs
to
be
 • By
a
simple
count,
the
G1
has
a
community
of
 
 beber
communicated
 potenBal
advocates
that
rivals
iPhone
 • But
this
misses
an
important
nuance:
iPhone
 
 fans
are
more
strongly
connected

  15. 15. WHAT
WE
FOUND…
 Summary:

 • It’s
important
to
engage
with
 
 criBcism
as
well
as
encourage
 advocacy
–
this
does
not
appear
 to
have
been
done
in
the
case
of
 G1
 • As
a
result,
unmoderated
 
 criBcal
voices
dominate
the
 busy
hub
of
the
smartphone
 Mature
smartphone
network
of
influence
 community
of
interest
–
a
key
 • The
smartphone
community
of
interest
comprises
a
 
 driver
of
customer
intenBon

 diffuse
halo
of
unconnected
sources,
and
an
 extensively
networked
hub
of
influenBal
sites.

 • Not
enough
posiBve
discussion
about
G1
takes
place
 
 in
the
“hub”
of
the
smartphone
community

  16. 16. RECOMMENDATIONS
 Coordinate
comms
 Online
sources
are
confused
by
the
relaBonship
between
the
 with
OHA
Partners
 Android
OS
and
the
G1
handset.
This
confusion
is
harmful
to
all
 OHA
members.
This
could
be
addressed
through
a
harmonized
 approach
to
communicaBon
at
OHA
level


 Align
aims
of
 Developer
communicaBons
have
been
very
successful,
but
 market
and
 market
communicaBons
have
not.
This
risks
puhng
the
cart
 before
the
horse
–
developer
uptake
is
ulBmately
driven
by
 developer
comms
 market
tracBon.
Market
communicaBons
must
become
a
priority

 Engage
exis8ng
 There
is
a
thriving
smartphone
community
of
interest
in
social
 smartphone
 media,
that
–
in
contrast
to
Apple
‐
remains
largely
unengaged
 by
OHA
members.
ParBcipaBon
in
this
community
needs
to
 community
 feature
in
the
communicaBons
roadmap
for
Android
phones


 Discourage
 It
is
tempBng
to
encourage
such
comparisons
as
a
way
of
driving
 “iPhone
killer”
 buzz.
At
present
Bme,
this
is
a
comparison
that
the
G1
can’t
 qualitaBvely
win.
The
G1
(and
other
Android
phones)
are
a
 narra8ve

 substanBally
different
offer
to
the
iPhone
–
and
they
should
be
 communicated
as
such



  17. 17. CASE
STUDY
2:
AVG
ANTIVIRUS
 AVG
is…
 
 • A
global
security
soWware
maker
protecBng
more
than
80
million
consumers
 and
small
businesses
in
167
countries
 • One
of
the
top
three
most
well
known
freeware
anBvirus



 
 • The
center
of
conversaBons
expressing
doubt
on
whether
free
anBvirus
can
 
 be
trusted
 Key
strategic
and
compe8tor
analy8cs’

elements:
 1
 •  Community
 2
 •  Thought
Leadership
 3
 •  Product
 4

 •  Price
 5
 •  Content

  18. 18. PROJECT
BRIEF
AND
PROGRAM
DESIGN
 Project
concept
 A
strategic
analysis
of
AVG’s
online
compeBtor
 landscape.
Overall
picture
of
social
media
presence
 and
compeBBve
posiBoning
 Content
scope
 Social
media
content
(blogs,
discussion
forums,
Q&A
 sites)
relevant
in
a
broad,
compeBBve
context
to
PC
 security
soWware
market.
Limited
set
of
compeBtors
 Geographic
Scope

 Global,
in
the
English
language


 Time
span

 Historical
analysis
encompassing
a
six
month
period

 (Summer/Autumn
2009)
 Resources
 4
weeks
of
full
Bme
resources
in
program
design,
 research
and
reporBng.
Content
acquired
using
a
range
 of
free
and
commercial
search
tools

  19. 19. WHAT
WE
FOUND…
 Blogging

 Strong
 average
 Weak
 Professional
Networks
 average
 Strong
 Weak
 Personal
Networks
 Strong
 average
 Weak
 Microblogging
 Strong
 average
 Weak
 Web
(inlinks)
 Strong
 average
 Weak

  20. 20. TCG
RESEARCH
 WHAT
WE
FOUND…
 
CONTENT
 COMMUNITY
–
FORUM Community:
Forums
‐
While
relevant
discussion
on
blogs
is
low
in
volume,
there
are
 tremendous
volumes
of
content
relevant
to
buying
decisions
over
security
soWware
 in
Q&A
/
recommendaBon
forums.
 IT
Professionals
 Small
business
 owners
 Family
 Cafemom.com
 babycenter.com
 everythingmom.com
 Gamers
 games.net
 momlogic.com
 “Casual
surfers”
 “PC
enthusiasts”
 destructoid.com
 parenthood.com
 ausgamers.com
 ocremix.org
 gaiaonline.com
 Travel

 Travellerspoint.com
 www.bootsnall.com
 File
sharers
 tripadvisor.com
 Q&A
/
Reviews
 filesharingz.com
 matadornetwork.com
 answers.yahoo.com
 forum.emule‐project.net
 globosapiens.net
 answerbag.com
 forum.utorrent.com
 wiki.answers.com
 share4all.com
 linkedin.com/answers
 dasoWs.com
 fluther.com

  21. 21. TCG
Research
 Product
–
AVG
Products
 WHAT
WE
FOUND…
 Product:
AVG
products
 Comments
highlighted
areas
of
strength
and
weakness
in
the
AVG
product
 Product
 liabili8es:

 ‐ Customer
support
 
 ‐ Updates
 
 ‐ Footprint
 
 Product
assets:

 ‐ User‐friendliness
 
 ‐ Price
 

  22. 22. TCG
Research
 Price
–
Free
v
Paid
 WHAT
WE
FOUND…
 Price:
Free
Vs.
Paid

 Common
 remarks
 about
 “free
 vs.
 paid”
 pricing
 for
 AV
 soWware
 break
 down
 as
 shown
below
(frequency
of
comment
is
reflected
in
the
size
of
the
bubble)
 “Always
save
 money
–
use
the
 “The
free
software
is
 free
version.”
 “The
free
program
 better
than
 works
well,
so
why
 nothing.”
 pay
for
it?”
 “If
you’re
serious
 “There’s
not
much
 about
protection,
 difference
between
 get
the
paid
 free
or
paid.”
 version.”

  23. 23. TCG
Research
 Price
­
Free
to
Paid
Upgrades
 WHAT
WE
FOUND…
 Price:
 Free
 to
 Paid
 Upgrades
 ‐
 We
 audited
 online
 reviews
 for
 commentary
 about
 user
 decisions
 to
 shiW
 from
 the
 free
 to
 the
 paid
 versions
 of
 anBvirus
 soWware.
 Where
explained,
the
reasoning
for
these
choices
can
be
classified
as
follows:

 Extra
ProtecBon:
 Control:
 While
they
appreciate
that
for
an
 For
some
users
the
paid
version
is
more
 average
user
the
standard
protection
 complicated
to
monitor
but
this
gives
 provided
by
the
free
version
is
probably
 more
control
(e.g.
customisation
of
 sufPicient,
it
is
nice
to
have
the
extra
 update
times
and
free
version
 protection
 limitations
on
automatic
scheduling)
 Comprehensiveness:
 After
testing,
they
feel
conPident
in
 Support:
 upgrading
to
the
paid
version,
for
full
 For

users
that
feel
they
need
a
much
 protection
from
a
broader
set
of
threats.
 greater
degree
of
technical
support
 ID
and
phishing
protection
are
also
 than
provided
by
free
alternatives
 mentioned
as
something
important
 missing
in
the
free
versions.

  24. 24. RECOMMENDATIONS
 Compe88ve
 The
compeBBve
environment
for
security
soWware
is
currently
 dominated
by
a
set
of
companies
whose
emarkeBng
efforts
are
 posi8oning
in
 invested
in
desBnaBon
strategies.
Challenge:
develop
an
 footprint
 effecBve
set
of
non‐desBnaBon
tacBcs
 Community
 AVG
needs
to
expand
its
base
of
referrer
communiBes;
gain
the
 trust
of
non‐referrer
communiBes
and
develop
non‐core
 communiBes.
Community
strategy
needs
to
operate
across
 those
3
axis,
with
separate
messaging
 Product
 At
present
Bme
online
user
commentary
about
the
av
market
is
 characterized

by
percepBon
of:
limited
product
differenBaBon,
a
 gap
in
the
supply
of
comprehensive
soluBons,
an
unfulfilled
user
 requirement
for
soWware
that
is
easy
to
install,
and

distaste
for
 av
soWware
that
hogs
system
resources
 Price

 The
av
market
is
dominated
by
free
product,
with
pay
product
 capped
at
costumer
“reservaBon
price”.
ReservaBon
price
and

 objecBon
to
premium
product
and
to
conversion
from
free
to
 paid
are
very
common,
but
could
be
overcome
via
social
media
 and
thought
leadership.
Price
alternaBves
could
be
developed
in
 an
increasingly
zero‐price
market.



  25. 25. LESSONS:
 Context
is
king:
 • 


Creation
of
data
is
not
an
end
in
itself,
and
bad
analysis
 
 
is
worse
than
no
analysis
at
all
 Insights
are
driven
by
exper8se,
not
tools:
 •  
Social
media
monitoring
tools
give
good
support
for
tactical
 communications,
but
are
less
suitable
for
articulating
and
solving
 strategic
challenges
 •  
Cost‐efLiciency
in
learning
to
use
a
tool
is
a
false
economy
if
the
 feature
set
doesn’t
support
your
goals
 Systema8zed
SM
research
can
support
knowledge
func8ons:
 •  

Competitor
analysis

 •  

Product
feature
/
brand
perception
analysis


  26. 26. THE
FUTURE
OF
SOCIAL
MEDIA
MONITORING
 More
sources,
especially
Facebook:
 •  Twitter
is
the
primary
target
for
analysis
right
 now
because
it's
wide
open
and
programmatically
 accessible.
It's
only
10%
the
size
of
Facebook
 More
sophis8cated
source
analysis:
 •  Semantic
analysis
of
areas
of
interest
and
personal
background
 information
 Conversa8on
discovery:
 •  One
of
the
biggest
challenges
for
organizations
jumping
into
social
 media
is
Linding
and
prioritizing
all
the
conversations
available

  27. 27. THANK
YOU!
 Veronica
Rosso
 Social
Media
Analyst
@
Open‐First
 veronica.rosso@theconversationgroup.com
 +1
(408)
8237860


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