Introduction to lod

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  • Acoustic Coupler
  • On the WWW there is more and more interesting DATA. But for Whom is this data
  • Evtoverslaan
  • - Before we go into the details with specific technologies, we’re going to give you some example of where this type of thinking has been appliedWeb semantics and Linked Data started out in academia in computer science and AI research, so that’s where originally most applications could be foundHowever, this quickly moved from there to other domains in researchThen into community efforts, public institutions, cultural institutions, as well as governments and administration – areas where was probably not to make a profitMedia with their vast amount of content have increasingly made use of Linked DataBusinesses are also recently seeing more and more benefits from using structured, linked data, for different reasons (internal efficiency, graph data as an improvement to the product (search engines), graph data as a valuable resource)
  • - Here is an actual example of a graph of dataThere are real-world things (ovals)There are data values (boxes)There are relationships (green arrows)
  • Introduction to lod

    1. 1. Introduction to Linked Data Victor de Boer Demonstratiecollege BUD 6-11-2013
    2. 2. Course setup LD principles + practice - Introduction to Linked Data - Building blocks of Linked Data - Simple Hands-on LD principles + practice - Serving Linked Open Data - SPARQL - Hands-on: ClioPatria LD principles + practice - Linking your data - Consuming Linked Data - Hands-on: Finalizing your LD
    3. 3. Internet, WWW, Linked Data? • Internet • Linked Data/Semantic Web • World Wide Web
    4. 4. Source: “Games Aktuell Blog”, http://www.gamesaktuell.de/Community/MySite/GenX 3601966-2605282/Blogs/Cyberpunks-beim-Mauerfall694794/
    5. 5. Internet, WWW, Linked Data? • Internet – 1970s – Network of linked computers – Protocols for communication (TCP/IP) – Multiple applications • World Wide Web • Linked Data/Semantic Web
    6. 6. Tim Berners-Lee (aka Sir Tim aka TBL) Invented the Web in 1989 Wrote the HTTP Protocol Wrote HTML language Wrote the first browser
    7. 7. Web of Documents (WWW) Linked Documents
    8. 8. Internet, WWW, Linked Data? • Internet – 1970s – Network of linked computers – Protocols for communication (TCP/IP) – Multiple applications • World Wide Web – – – – 1989 Tim Berners-Lee Application on top of Internet Hyperlinked documents Protocols for communication (HTTP) – Markup languages (HTML) – Browsers • Linked Data/Semantic Web
    9. 9. Documents hard to read for machines ?
    10. 10. Web of Data Linked Data Semantic Web
    11. 11. Tim Berners-Lee (aka Sir Tim aka TBL) Invented the Web in 1989 Wrote the HTTP Protocol Wrote HTML language Wrote the first browser Wrote 2001 Scientific American paper “The Semantic Web” (with Ora Lasilla and Jim Hendler)
    12. 12. Internet, WWW, Linked Data? • Internet – 1970s – Network of linked computers – Protocols for communication (TCP/IP) – Multiple applications • World Wide Web – – – – 1989 Tim Berners-Lee Application on top of Internet Hyperlinked documents Protocols for communication (HTTP) – Markup languages (HTML) – Browsers • Linked Data/Semantic Web – 2001 Tim Berners-Lee – Application on top of Internet, – Smart Web of hyperlinked data, information and knowledge – Standards / languages for representing data, information, knowledge (RDF, OWL) – Since 2007 “Linked Data”
    13. 13. Wat is Linked Open Data Open data is about licensing Linked Data is about interoperability Linked Open Data combines the two ``a term used to describe a recommended best practice for exposing, sharing, and connecting pieces of data, information, and knowledge on the Semantic Web using URIs and RDF.’’ --Wikipedia ``Sharable, spreadable and nerd-friendly’’ -- Charlotte S H Jensen, kulturweb
    14. 14. Linked Open Data five star system ★ Available on the web (whatever format), but with an open license ★★ Available as machine-readable structured data (e.g. excel instead of image scan of a table) ★★★ as (2) plus non-proprietary format (e.g. CSV instead of excel) ★★★★ All the above plus, Use open standards from W3C (RDF and SPARQL) to identify things, so that people can point at your stuff ★★★★★ All the above, plus: Link your data to other people’s data to provide context www.w3.org/designissues/linkeddata.html
    15. 15. Linked Data Cloud Diagram May 2007
    16. 16. Oct 2007
    17. 17. “Linking Open Data cloud diagram, by Richard Cyganiak and Anja Jentzsch. http://lod-cloud.net/”
    18. 18. “Linking Open Data cloud diagram, by Richard Cyganiak and Anja Jentzsch. http://lod-cloud.net/”
    19. 19. Examples of Linked Data • • • • Academia, Research Community Libraries, Museums, Cultural Heritage Government and public institutions (Open Data) • Media • Business
    20. 20. How does all this work? • • • • Data, not documents Structured data Graph data! W3C Web standards stack – URIs, HTTP, RDF, RDFa, RDFS, OWL, SPARQL, etc
    21. 21. Resource Description Framework (RDF) triples vdeboer name “Victor de Boer” Subject vdeboer Predicate naam Object “Victor de Boer”
    22. 22. RDF triples vdeboer name “Victor de Boer” student_in BKO_cursus Subject vdeboer vdeboer Predicate naam student_in Object “Victor de Boer” BKO_cursus
    23. 23. RDF Graph email Hester Glasbeek Person v.de.boer@vu.nl type naam type H_Glasbeek vdeboer name “Victor de Boer” teaches student_in BKO Cursus @nl name BKO_cursus name BKO Course@en
    24. 24. Interoperability v.de.boer @vu.nl type email name “Victor de Boer” Hester Glasbeek Person naam type H_Glas beek vdeboe r student_in BKO_cu rsus name name BKO Cursus @nl BKO Course@en
    25. 25. Hands-on Session 1 • 15 mins • Introduce yourselves to each other! • Draw a social RDF graph of your group – Represent each member of the group – Give everyone a name – You know each other now, so you can connect to each other in the graph – Add other data about yourselves: • Hometown • University • Things you like (e.g., music, films, …)

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