Participation, Publication, Persistence & Platforms

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Participation, Publication, Persistence & Platforms

  1. 1. ViBRANT Virtual Biodiversity ViBRANT Virtual Biodiversity Publication, Persistence, Platforms & Participation Gregor Hagedorn Julius Kühn-Institute (JKI) Epidemiology and Pathogen Diagnostics Berlin, GermanyPublished under Creative Commons by-sa 3.0 (unless marked otherwise)
  2. 2. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityA not fully serious comparison: Taxonomy 1.0  Web 1.0 = Internet of interlinked = Linnean Taxonomy, competing publishing sites: Private Nomenclature, Printed homepages, Publishers (Springer, Publications, Types Elsevier), Companies (Amazon, Taxonomy 1.1 Google, Yahoo) = Digitally accessible “fact” databases: EMBL/Genbank/BoL, Species 2000, GBIF – Owned and administered efforts Taxonomy 2.0  Web 2.0 = Platforms offering = Moving publishing and creativity Collaboration and Service: to the web, sharing and re-using Wikipedia, Blogsphere, Facebook, content? etc.
  3. 3. ViBRANT Virtual Biodiversity Publication = make information available to the public To whom is clear. Who did it and how is not defined
  4. 4. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityPublication Who did it = Important Authorship, topics for Creatorship, Attribution, ViBRANT Responsibility, … but not Bibliometry elaborated /scientometry in this talk. Copyright
  5. 5. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityPublication How was it published? Books Journals Newspapers Online
  6. 6. ViBRANT Virtual Biodiversity Publication(Raysonho & Carl Spitzweg Public Domain, Lin Kristensen cc by)
  7. 7. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityPublication (Unknown, Bundesarchiv cc by-sa 3.0)
  8. 8. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityPublication (Tasto, cc by-sa 3.0; Anonymous painter, Public Domain)
  9. 9. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityPublication Publications may or may not be persistent
  10. 10. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityPublication Online publications are very much not persistent
  11. 11. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityPublication The White House, a Drupal site:
  12. 12. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityPublication (US Government Public Domain)
  13. 13. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityPublication Online publications are very much not persistent. Regression.
  14. 14. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityPublication Online publications are very much not persistent. Bug reports to bugzilla.human-culture.org
  15. 15. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityPublication Online publications are very much not persistent. But of course: Choice what to preserve ... Practicality ... Personality rights – right to forget ...
  16. 16. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityPublication
  17. 17. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityPublication World wide web BETA 2011
  18. 18. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityPublication How do most scientists see online publications?
  19. 19. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityPublication (Tasto, cc by-sa 3.0; Anonymous painter, Public Domain)
  20. 20. ViBRANT Virtual Biodiversity Persistence
  21. 21. ViBRANT Virtual Biodiversity Persistence = reliable information retrieval at a later time = unchanged = trust
  22. 22. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityPersistence Persistence: = Paper and Libraries = Digital formats and Libraries (trying …) = Other memory institutions
  23. 23. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityPersistence Commercial Persistence: = as long as it sells Not: out of print books, older movies on DVD, web pages that gain too little income.
  24. 24. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityPersistence Persistence on the web: = Universities and Museums? (usually they need to “move on” – exceptions exist)
  25. 25. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityPersistence Persistence on the web: = Internet Archive? (in part, but largely a copyright violation)
  26. 26. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityPersistence Persistence on the web: = PDF?
  27. 27. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityPersistence Persistence on the web: = PDF? A case of mimicry? (false transfer of properties by similarity) (Henry Walter Bates 1862, Public Domain)
  28. 28. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityPersistence Achieving persistence on the web: = Legal license frameworks = Shared platforms
  29. 29. ViBRANT Virtual Biodiversity What is an “Online-Publication”?
  30. 30. (Wolfgang Sauber, cc-by-sa 3.0, from Commons)Goal: Like reliable, persistent copies in a library
  31. 31. (Jochen Jansen, cc-by-sa 3.0, from Commons)Reality: Newspaper in shop window
  32. 32. (Rob Qld., cc-by, from Commons) “To publish into the Internet” = Shop window.Without license, online publishers are shop windows!
  33. 33. ViBRANT Virtual Biodiversity Will the bread remain behind glass panes?
  34. 34. ViBRANT Virtual Biodiversity We need a better word for “Online-Publication”!
  35. 35. ViBRANT Virtual Biodiversity Part of the solution:
  36. 36. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityPersistence Persistence on the web: = Legal license frameworks = Shared platforms
  37. 37. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityPersistence Shared platforms • enough backing institutions • a critical mass (and value) of content Examples • EDIT / Scratchpad / ViBRANT • Wikimedia Foundation
  38. 38. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityPersistence Content rules! (if function is good enough...)
  39. 39. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityPersistence Content rules! Biodiversity Heritage Library is exciting!
  40. 40. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityPersistence EoL: no content, only function ViBRANT: Content development, publishing workflow teaming with publishers
  41. 41. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityPersistence EoL: no content, only function Similar to Google ? Negative Allelopathy between EoL and Google?
  42. 42. ViBRANT Virtual Biodiversity Mortality
  43. 43. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityPersistence – Philosophical aside Since we are immortal … and since it is really annoying if someone changes the rules or drops your work while we still live … the private web site is really the safest solution …
  44. 44. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityPersistence – Philosophical aside Problem for ViBRANT: How to convince people they are mortal?
  45. 45. ViBRANT Virtual Biodiversity Platforms
  46. 46. ViBRANT Virtual Biodiversity Platforms • Persistence (collaboration in persistence) • Quality (collaboration in quality) • Ease of publishing (distribution of work) • Re-use of content (open content licenses) • Technical synergies (infrastructure)
  47. 47. ViBRANT Virtual Biodiversity Participation • Organisations • Authors • Developers
  48. 48. Participation• Organisations• Authors• Developers
  49. 49. ViBRANT Virtual Biodiversity 1. Platforms are brands Brands can be shared
  50. 50. ViBRANT Virtual Biodiversity Branded platforms can ensure publishing esteem • Journals do this • Classical esteem by respected previous works • Citation index not practical on individual works
  51. 51. ViBRANT Virtual Biodiversity Journals do it. Publishers do it. (© ViBRANT FP7 Project, cc-by-NC-sa 3.0)
  52. 52. ViBRANT Virtual Biodiversity ViBRANT SHOULD DO IT. ViBRANT Virtual Biodiversity (© ViBRANT FP7 Project, cc-by-NC-sa 3.0)
  53. 53. ViBRANT Virtual Biodiversity Worry: ViBRANT Virtual Biodiversity (© ViBRANT FP7 Project, cc-by-NC-sa 3.0)
  54. 54. ViBRANT Virtual Biodiversity Worry: (© EDIT FP7 Project, cc-by-NC-sa 3.0)
  55. 55. ViBRANT Virtual Biodiversity Scratchpads: = Invisible Infrastructure
  56. 56. ViBRANT Virtual Biodiversity With many visible, but fragmented online “books” or “broschures” on top
  57. 57. ViBRANT Virtual Biodiversity Danger of fragmentation: Less attraction No “must have, must learn”
  58. 58. ViBRANT Virtual Biodiversity 2. Publishing quality
  59. 59. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityParticipation and Publication Quality Review on publication platforms may be anonymous as in classical print journals Or: reviewers comment openly – as in Open Review Journals
  60. 60. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityParticipation and Publication Quality Criticism is dangerous. It can be seen as an attack. It may sometimes even be wrong. It may endanger future collaborations.
  61. 61. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityParticipation and Publication Quality Most German scientists have a criticism inhibition – that is, it is difficult to obtain honest criticism.
  62. 62. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityParticipation and Publication Quality Germans are impolite.
  63. 63. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityParticipation and Publication Quality → Most non-German scientists have a STRONG criticism inhibition?
  64. 64. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityParticipation and Publication Quality How to manage and express anonymous review on publication platforms? Or rather: How to mix open mass review with quality review?
  65. 65. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityPublication Quality Quality of publication depends on 1. authors’ qualification 2. authors’ pain cycles 3. quality review
  66. 66. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityPublication Quality Pain cycle in journal publishing: 1. Lead author writes and aggregates 2. Co-authors review the whole 3. Internal review by a colleague 4. Journal submission and review 5. Revisions, re-submission
  67. 67. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityPublication Quality Pain cycle in web self-publishing: 1. Lead author writes and aggregates 2. Co-authors review the whole 3. Internal review by a colleague 4. Journal submission and review 5. Revisions, re-submission 6. Ideally: mass-review …
  68. 68. Participation• Organisations• Authors• Developers
  69. 69. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityPlatforms What motivates to collaborate? • Sharing work to reach goals beyond one’s own resources • Persistence of publishing action • Credit as accepted publication • Sense of co-ownership • Sense of co-responsibility • Interactions with colleagues: positive and negative feedback
  70. 70. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityPlatforms What motivates to not collaborate? • Incompatible software frameworks • Optimization for specialized use cases • Commercial exploitation plans • Publishing exploitation plans • Funding rules (Shared platforms seen as “previous projects”) • Lack of trust • Interactions with colleagues
  71. 71. Participation• Organisations• Authors• Developers
  72. 72. ViBRANT Virtual Biodiversity Technical and social Analysis of MediaWiki as a Collaboration Platform
  73. 73. Traditional
  74. 74. Traditional
  75. 75. Traditional
  76. 76. Wiki-centric = a Service Oriented Architecture
  77. 77. Wiki-centric = a Service Oriented Architecture lorem ipsum lorem ipsum lorem ipsum [[Linking]] [[:Category:Index]] Standard web Repository database rendering Any data entry (laborious) Creators: Scientists & Amateurs Advanced or graphic reports Analysis Service Specialized tools Identification Indexing database (comfortable) and other aka uBio, EoL ... J query tools Develop Develop Develop Develop Develop Template Develop Extension Develop © G. Hagedorn, cc-by-sa 3.0
  78. 78. ViBRANT Virtual Biodiversity Shift power from developers to users!
  79. 79. ViBRANT Virtual Biodiversity Shift power from developers to users! Layers of participation in development: Base software Extensions Templates Content creation
  80. 80. ViBRANT Virtual Biodiversity Wrap up
  81. 81. ViBRANT Virtual Biodiversity Platforms overcome borders
  82. 82. Platforms(Author: Ziegelbrenner, cc by 2.5, from Commons)
  83. 83. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityPlatforms• Individual borders in a fragmented Europe• Lots of tariffs• Lots of currencies
  84. 84. From EC/EU …To …
  85. 85. Goal: “developing andexplaining the legal andtechnical infrastructurerequired to make “open”work…” (© creativecommons.org, CC by)
  86. 86. ViBRANT Virtual BiodiversityPlatforms • No borders • No tariffs • No currencies
  87. 87. ≠ (© creativecommons.org, CC by)
  88. 88. → (© creativecommons.org, CC by)
  89. 89. (© creativecommons.org, CC by)
  90. 90. CC-non-commercial most likely excludes use by most non-profit organisations (© creativecommons.org, CC by)
  91. 91. OK for: Private persons andgovernmental institutions having complete separate income (© creativecommons.org, CC by)
  92. 92. Use probably not allowed byorganisations the income of whichcan increase as a result of their use of CC non-commercial licensed materials (text, media, etc.) (© creativecommons.org, CC by)
  93. 93. Even non-profit, wellfare and charitable societies typically can have increasedincome through increased membership, admission (museum!) or course fees, advertisement revenues, etc. (© creativecommons.org, CC by)
  94. 94. “Probably not allowed”= not clearly defined in the license,= studies made by Creative Commons were inconclusive,= waits for a court case! (© creativecommons.org, CC by)
  95. 95. ViBRANT Virtual Biodiversity Set examples of open source. BE A LION! Use CC by or CC by-sa without a non-commercial or non-derivative clause
  96. 96. (© Tambako the Jaguar, CC by 2.0, from Commons)
  97. 97. ViBRANT Virtual Biodiversity Presently: Content is not shared – re-use remains largely limited to original authors. Publication is typically made through publishers claiming exclusive copyright. Scientific data are lost in gray areas of copyright.
  98. 98. ViBRANT Virtual Biodiversity Envy the productivity achieved in open source software development (a community…) Envy the productivity achieved by Wikipedia (a community…) Use licenses without a “non-commercial” clause for content. (© creativecommons.org, CC by; Tambako the Jaguar, CC by 2.0, from Commons)

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