The Impact of Brain Research on Game and Simulation Design Rick Van Sant, Ph.D. Ferris State University
Brain Plasticity <ul><li>the brain never stops changing and adjusting. </li></ul><ul><li>The brain physically changes as w...
Brain Based Game Development <ul><li>Brain regions mature at different stages </li></ul><ul><li>Earliest = back of brain w...
Neurons Making Connections
The iBrain <ul><li>Technologies change the way our brain works and the way we think </li></ul><ul><li>2005 study:  young p...
The iBrain  Continuous Partial Attention <ul><li>Continuous partial attention  (not multitasking) results in constant need...
The iBrain  The Breakdown <ul><li>At some point, sense of control and self worth we feel with continuous partial attention...
The iBrain <ul><li>Good News:  </li></ul><ul><li>Gaming and Simulations are different </li></ul>
Gender Differences
Gender and Gaming Red and Yellow are regions that showed greater activation for males compared to females.  No regions sho...
E-Learning Conundrum:  We are social learners sitting alone at computers
E-Learning Conundrum:  How do you elicit the correct amount of arousal from a learner sitting alone at computers
The Learning Brain  Designing Games and Simulations <ul><li>Kolb = Four Pillars </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Experiencing  (concr...
Implications for E-Learning Design
Implications for E-Learning Design
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Implications of Brain Research on Game and Simulation Design

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Keynote Session: “

Rick Van Sant
Professor of Technology and Learning@ Ferris State University

Neuroscience and game and simulation design and development as separate disciplines have advanced considerably in recent years. Join Rick Van Sant as he explores synergies between the disciplines to consider how neuroscience findings can enhance game and simulation design.

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  • Implications of Brain Research on Game and Simulation Design

    1. 1. The Impact of Brain Research on Game and Simulation Design Rick Van Sant, Ph.D. Ferris State University
    2. 2. Brain Plasticity <ul><li>the brain never stops changing and adjusting. </li></ul><ul><li>The brain physically changes as we learn </li></ul>
    3. 3. Brain Based Game Development <ul><li>Brain regions mature at different stages </li></ul><ul><li>Earliest = back of brain which mediates contact with the environment (sensory function, hearing, touch, spatial processing. </li></ul><ul><li>Next = part of brain that helps you know where the light switch is in your bathroom even though you cannot see it </li></ul><ul><li>Last = prefrontal cortex which controls planning, suppressing impulses, setting priorities, weighing consequences </li></ul>
    4. 4. Neurons Making Connections
    5. 5. The iBrain <ul><li>Technologies change the way our brain works and the way we think </li></ul><ul><li>2005 study: young people 8 – 18 yrs old expose their brains to 81/2 hours of digital and video stimulation a day. </li></ul><ul><li>2008 study: five days of learning technology showed physical evidence of a rewired brain. </li></ul>
    6. 6. The iBrain Continuous Partial Attention <ul><li>Continuous partial attention (not multitasking) results in constant need to scan for contact </li></ul><ul><li>Constant heightened need = stress </li></ul><ul><li>Brain begins to thrive on perpetual connectivity, becomes physically addicted to state of anticipation of exciting news at any moment </li></ul>
    7. 7. The iBrain The Breakdown <ul><li>At some point, sense of control and self worth we feel with continuous partial attention breaks down – brains not built to sustain this type of activity. </li></ul><ul><li>Brain strain = errors in work, judgment. Become irritable, distracted. </li></ul>
    8. 8. The iBrain <ul><li>Good News: </li></ul><ul><li>Gaming and Simulations are different </li></ul>
    9. 9. Gender Differences
    10. 10. Gender and Gaming Red and Yellow are regions that showed greater activation for males compared to females. No regions showed greater activation for females compared to males. This is what your brain looks like while gaming
    11. 11. E-Learning Conundrum: We are social learners sitting alone at computers
    12. 12. E-Learning Conundrum: How do you elicit the correct amount of arousal from a learner sitting alone at computers
    13. 13. The Learning Brain Designing Games and Simulations <ul><li>Kolb = Four Pillars </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Experiencing (concrete experience) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Examining (reflective observation) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Explaining (abstract conceptualization) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Applying (active experimentation) </li></ul></ul>Image of Brain Neurons (Credit: Image courtesy of Robert S. Mc.Neil)
    14. 14. Implications for E-Learning Design
    15. 15. Implications for E-Learning Design

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