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Analytic
Versus
Holistic Rubrics
Vanessa E. Asaias
At the end of the lesson, the
students are expected to:
1. differentiate between analytic and holistic
rubrics;
2. point o...
Analytic Rubrics Holistic Rubrics
• identify and assess
components of a
finished product
• assess student work as a
whole
...
Example 1:
Analytic Rubric
(Product-Oriented Performance Based
Assessment)
Example 1:
Analytic Rubric
(Product-Oriented Pe...
Example 1:
Analytic Rubric
(Product-Oriented Performance
Based Assessment)
Example 1:
Analytic Rubric
(Product-Oriented Pe...
Criteria Advanced (2) Adept (1) Unacceptable (0) Score
I.
Organization/
Format
Organizes material in
a clear, appropriate
...
Criteria Advanced (2) Adept (1) Unacceptable (0) Score
IV.
Research and
Interpret
Data/
Information
Correct
interpretation...
Example 2:
Holistic Rubric
(Product-Oriented Performance Based
Assessment)
Example 2:
Holistic Rubric
(Product-Oriented Pe...
Example 2:
Holistic Rubric
(Product-Oriented Performance
Based Assessment)
Example 2:
Holistic Rubric
(Product-Oriented Pe...
Name: ______________________ Date: __________
Score Description
4 Makes accurate estimations. Uses appropriate
mathematica...
Example 3:
Analytic Rubric
(Process-Oriented Performance
Based Assessment)
Example 3:
Analytic Rubric
(Process-Oriented Pe...
Example 4:
Holistic Rubric
(Process-Oriented Performance
Based Assessment)
Example 4:
Holistic Rubric
(Process-Oriented Pe...
4 Student presents strong, cohesive, and clear argument with well-connected and
organized sentences. Student uses a range ...
Holistic Rubric
When to use analytic
rubrics?
When to use holistic
rubrics?
• substantial feedback to
students is desired
...
How many levels of performance
should be included in a rubric?
In an oral presentation rubric, amount
of eye contact is an important criterion.
Performance on that criterion could be
ju...
If you cannot effectively discriminate
among student performance with just three
levels, you can expand the number of leve...
For a holistic rubrics, start with a small number of
categories. You might limit your broad judgments to
• satisfactory
• ...
References
1. De Guzman-Santos, R. Ph.D. (2007). Advanced methods in
educational assessment. Quezon City: Lorimar
Publishi...
Analytic vs HolisticRrubrics
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Analytic vs HolisticRrubrics

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Rubrics are essential to make assessment objective, impartial and unbiased. Here's a presentation on the two types of rubrics that teachers can effectively use.

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Analytic vs HolisticRrubrics

  1. 1. Analytic Versus Holistic Rubrics Vanessa E. Asaias
  2. 2. At the end of the lesson, the students are expected to: 1. differentiate between analytic and holistic rubrics; 2. point out the factors to be considered in choosing the type of rubric to use; 3. determine the appropriate number of the levels of performance in a rubric.
  3. 3. Analytic Rubrics Holistic Rubrics • identify and assess components of a finished product • assess student work as a whole • articulate levels of performance for each criterion • do not list separate levels of performance for each criterion • give diagnostic information to the teacher and formative feedback to students • provide single overall score that does not communicate information about what to do to improve
  4. 4. Example 1: Analytic Rubric (Product-Oriented Performance Based Assessment) Example 1: Analytic Rubric (Product-Oriented Performance Based Assessment) Mrs. Cruz prepares an analytic rubric for technical writing. She decides on the following five criteria: • Organization/Format •Content •Writing Conventions •Research and Interpret Data/Information •Appropriate Vocabulary The rubric has three levels of performance ( Advanced, Adept, Unacceptable).
  5. 5. Example 1: Analytic Rubric (Product-Oriented Performance Based Assessment) Example 1: Analytic Rubric (Product-Oriented Performance Based Assessment) Subjects: Science, Writing Number of scales: 5 Number of Scale Points: 3 Secondary Level: Third Year High School
  6. 6. Criteria Advanced (2) Adept (1) Unacceptable (0) Score I. Organization/ Format Organizes material in a clear, appropriate and precise manner. Organizes material in an appropriate manner, but may lack some clarity or consistency. Presents basic information but may have extraneous material. Little evidence of cohesive plan. Little or no description of detail. Ideas seem scrambled, jumbled or disconnected. II. Content Material content is clear, relevant, accurate and concise. Material is appropriate, but may lack a clear connection to the purpose. Little evidence of appropriate content. III. Writing Conventions Enhances the readability of the paper. Minor errors are present, but they do not detract form the reliability of the paper. Incorrectly interprets data or information with little or no analysis or conclusion. Little or no evidence of research presented.
  7. 7. Criteria Advanced (2) Adept (1) Unacceptable (0) Score IV. Research and Interpret Data/ Information Correct interpretation of data or information. Analysis and conclusion are based on research. Correctly interprets data or information, but analysis or conclusion may not be supported by research. Incorrectly interprets data or information with little or no analysis or conclusion. Little or no evidence of research presented. V. Appropriate Vocabulary Articulates vocabulary and terms associated with the subject matter. Some inappropriate vocabulary present, or limited use of appropriate vocabulary. Inappropriate vocabulary and use occurs.
  8. 8. Example 2: Holistic Rubric (Product-Oriented Performance Based Assessment) Example 2: Holistic Rubric (Product-Oriented Performance Based Assessment) Mr. Reyes, a grade six teacher, is planning a unit on the topic of data analysis, focusing on the skills of estimation and interpretation of graphs. Specifically, at the end of this unit, he wants to be able to assess his students’ mastery of the following instructional objectives: • Students will properly interpret a bar graph. • Students will accurately estimate values from within a bar graph.
  9. 9. Example 2: Holistic Rubric (Product-Oriented Performance Based Assessment) Example 2: Holistic Rubric (Product-Oriented Performance Based Assessment) Subject: Mathematics Elementary Level: Grade Six Number of Scale Points: 5
  10. 10. Name: ______________________ Date: __________ Score Description 4 Makes accurate estimations. Uses appropriate mathematical operations with no mistakes. Draws logical conclusions supported by graph. Sound explanations of thinking. 3 Makes good estimations. Uses appropriate mathematical operations with few mistakes. Draws logical conclusions supported by graph. Good explanations of thinking. 2 Attempts estimations, although many inaccurate. Uses inappropriate mathematical operations , but no mistakes. Draws conclusions not supported by graph. Offers little explanation. 1 Makes inaccurate estimations. Uses inappropriate mathematical operations. Draws no conclusions related top graph. Offers no explanations of thinking. 0 no response; task not attempted
  11. 11. Example 3: Analytic Rubric (Process-Oriented Performance Based Assessment) Example 3: Analytic Rubric (Process-Oriented Performance Based Assessment) Subjects: Science Number of scales: 5 Number of Scale Points: 4 Secondary Level: Third Year High School
  12. 12. Example 4: Holistic Rubric (Process-Oriented Performance Based Assessment) Example 4: Holistic Rubric (Process-Oriented Performance Based Assessment) Subject: English Elementary Level: Grade Six Number of Scale Points: 4
  13. 13. 4 Student presents strong, cohesive, and clear argument with well-connected and organized sentences. Student uses a range of specific vocabulary and grammatical forms to convey message. May contain a few minor errors in vocabulary and grammar that do not impact meaning. 3 Student presents a cohesive and clear argument with complex and complete sentences. Student uses appropriate vocabulary and grammatical forms to convey message. Contains several errors in vocabulary and grammar that lead to easily-clarified misunderstandings. 2 Student presents a mostly cohesive and clear argument with complete sentences. Student uses mostly appropriate vocabulary and forms. Speech contains significant errors in vocabulary and grammar that impair comprehension. Misunderstandings are resolved in the target language. 1 Argument is vague or incoherent, and is presented in simple sentences. Student uses very basic vocabulary and grammar forms, and speech includes major errors that impact comprehension. Misunderstandings must be resolved in the L1 or aren’t resolved at all.
  14. 14. Holistic Rubric When to use analytic rubrics? When to use holistic rubrics? • substantial feedback to students is desired • an overall, summative score is the goal • fairly focused type of response is required • there is no single correct answer/responses to a task • necessary to assess each criteria separately • quick or gross judgment needs to be made
  15. 15. How many levels of performance should be included in a rubric?
  16. 16. In an oral presentation rubric, amount of eye contact is an important criterion. Performance on that criterion could be judged along three levels of performance: never, sometimes, always. Start small! Makes eye contact with audience never sometimes always
  17. 17. If you cannot effectively discriminate among student performance with just three levels, you can expand the number of levels of performance to include never, rarely, sometimes, usually and always. Start small! Makes eye contact with audience never rarely sometimes usually always
  18. 18. For a holistic rubrics, start with a small number of categories. You might limit your broad judgments to • satisfactory • unsatisfactory • not attempted or • check-plus • check • no check or even just • satisfactory • unsatisfactory Start small!
  19. 19. References 1. De Guzman-Santos, R. Ph.D. (2007). Advanced methods in educational assessment. Quezon City: Lorimar Publishing, Inc. 2. Nitko, A., & Brookhart, S. (2011). Educational assessment of students. Boston, MA: Pearson Educational , Inc. 3. Raagas E.(2010).Assessment and evaluation of student learning. Cagayan de Oro City. Philippines: ELT DATstaT Analysis Center. 4. http://jfmueller.faculty.noctrl.edu/toolbox/rubrics.htm 5. http:/www.carla.umn.edu/assessment/vac/evaluation/e 1.html

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