Dennen digital ethics2012

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Presentation at 2nd Annual Symposium on Digital Ethics, Loyola University

October 2012

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Dennen digital ethics2012

  1. 1. 10/31/12  The  Ethics  of  Online  Coursework:    Instructor  Responsibilities,  Student  Participation,  and  Managing  Public-­‐‑Private  Learning   { Vanessa  P.  Dennen Florida  State  University 2nd  Annual  Symposium  on  Digital  Ethics Loyola  University October  29,  2012 •  Your  future  employer  was  able  to  hear   everything  you  said  in  a  class  3  years  ago? •  Your  ex  tracked  you  down  based  on   information  about  a  course  assignment? •  A  class  discussion  aRracted  media  aRention? •  Scholars  in  your  field  beliRled  and  ridiculed   you  for  your  naïveté  when  you  were  just  trying   to  do  your  coursework? •  A  student  at  another  university  downloaded   your  assignment  and  turned  it  in  as  her  own? What  if  … 1  
  2. 2. 10/31/12   •  Traditional  classrooms  =  ephemeral   spaces   •  Online  classrooms  =  archived  spaces   •  Web  2.0  activities  =  an  open  stage Is  learning  private? Is  this  space  private?    How  private? 2  
  3. 3. 10/31/12  Is  this  space  private?    How  private? Is  this  space  private?    How  private? 3  
  4. 4. 10/31/12  Is  this  space  private?    How  private? Is  this  space  private?    How  private? 4  
  5. 5. 10/31/12   •  Online  tools  are  supported  and  encouraged  by   the  institution •  Web  2.0  tools  provide  interesting  pedagogical   possibilities  –  both  in  and  out  of  class •  Technology  might  motivate  today’s  learners   Issues:  Instructor  Perspective •  May  have  an  account  already •  May  be  entirely  unfamiliar •  Teacher  is  in  charge •  Focused  on  the  grade Issues:  Student  Perspective 5  
  6. 6. 10/31/12   •  Researchers  are  bound  by  IRBs •  FERPA  protects  student  records •  NETS  Standards  and  district  policies   guide  K-­‐‑12  technology  use •  University  level  course  technology   decisions  typically  are  left  to  the   discretion  of  the  instructor No  Guidelines Context:  Reflective  blog  for  course  (mandatory   assignment) •  While  vanity  googling  during  a  job  search,  the   student  realized  the  blog  was  still  online  years   later Case  1:  Lingering  Lessons 6  
  7. 7. 10/31/12   Context:  Student  tweeting  under  real  name   •  Jane  Doe:  Fuck  yeah!  It’s  my  19th  birthday!!! •  Jane  Doe:  Check  me  out,  bitches!  I’m  19  today!   Worship  me! •  Jane  Doe:  (twitpic  with  friends,  beers  in  hand) •  Jane  Doe:  Head  hurts.  Fuckin  awesome   birthday  party. Case  2:  Troublesome  Tweets Context:  Student  was  given  an  assignment  to  get   information  from  an  expert. •  Student  posted  to  a  popular  academic  forum,   asking  for  help  in  a  very  general  way. •  Responses  criticized  the  student  heavily.  (A  few   helped  or  were  at  least  kind.) •  The  interactions  remain  archived  and   searchable. Case  3:  Forum  Faux  Pas 7  
  8. 8. 10/31/12   •  Explore  privacy  controls  of  tools  you  will  use •  Develop  options  for  students  who  may  be   uncomfortable  online Solutions:  Pre  class •  Teach  students  about  privacy  control  options •  Pseudonyms •  Multiple  accounts •  “no  robots” Solutions:  Pre  assignment 8  
  9. 9. 10/31/12   •  Teach  students  about  making  good  choices   online •  Encourage  students  to  talk  about  their   experience(s)  online •  Alert  students  to  potential  bad  choices  online  –   even  if  those  choices  are  not  directly  course   related   Solutions:  During  class •  Remind  students  that  they  may  wish  to  delete   items  or  accounts  when  you  are  done  grading   everything Solutions:  Post  class 9  
  10. 10. 10/31/12   •  There  is  no  need  to  shy  away  from  using  online   tools  in  a  class  seRing •  Instructors  have  a  responsibility     to  educate  students  about  online     behavior  and  protect  them  from     online  harm •  The  power  is  in  having  guidelines     and  providing  education,  not  in     enforcing  rules Closing  thoughts:  Do  more  good  than  harm 10  

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